Limits...
Advanced material and approach for metal ions removal from aqueous solutions.

Turhanen PA, Vepsäläinen JJ, Peräniemi S - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The method is based on a resin free, solid, non-toxic, microcrystalline bisphosphonate material, which has very low solubility in water (59 mg/l to ion free Milli-Q water and 13 mg/l to 3.5% NaCl solution).The material has been produced almost quantitatively on a 1 kg scale (it has been prepared also on a pilot scale, ca. 7 kg) and tested successfully for its ability to collect metal cations from different sources, such as ground water and mining process waters.This material has several advantages compared to the currently used approaches, such as no need for any precipitation step.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Pharmacy,Biocenter Kuopio, University of Eastern Finland, P.O.Box 1627, FI-70211, Kuopio, Finland.

ABSTRACT
A Novel approach to remove metals from aqueous solutions has been developed. The method is based on a resin free, solid, non-toxic, microcrystalline bisphosphonate material, which has very low solubility in water (59 mg/l to ion free Milli-Q water and 13 mg/l to 3.5% NaCl solution). The material has been produced almost quantitatively on a 1 kg scale (it has been prepared also on a pilot scale, ca. 7 kg) and tested successfully for its ability to collect metal cations from different sources, such as ground water and mining process waters. Not only was this material highly efficient at collecting several metal ions out of solution it also proved to be regenerable and reusable over a number of adsorption/desorption, which is crucial for environmental friendliness. This material has several advantages compared to the currently used approaches, such as no need for any precipitation step.

No MeSH data available.


The total amounts of metals (mg/g) removed by N10O (A) or Diphonix® (D) from MWP1 sample (t = 24 h).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4355739&req=5

f3: The total amounts of metals (mg/g) removed by N10O (A) or Diphonix® (D) from MWP1 sample (t = 24 h).

Mentions: In the case of sample MPW1, the results indicate clearly that the amount of adsorbent used (10 g/l N10O and 30 g/l Diphonix® resin) were too low for this sample and would need to be increased. Only aluminum and copper ions were effectively removed with both adsorbents (also iron ions in the case of Diphonix® resin), whereas MnII, CoII, NiII, ZnII, and CdII ions were poorly collected (Table 5, Figure 3). The high removal per cent of CuII was not surprising since CuII ion had been previously observed to compete successfully in complex formation with other metals ions (Table 3). The percent removals of MnII, ZnII and CdII were higher with N10O whereas Diphonix® resin collected FeII/III and NiII ions more effectively, as expected on the basis of the capacity experiments. Instead, N10O collected less calcium and magnesium ions than Diphonix® resin which was somewhat surprising because N10O had higher Ca(II) and Mg(II) capacities (Table 2), but then again calcium and magnesium ions were almost last ones in bounding order (Table 3) and probably they lost the competition for coordination sites. On the whole, both adsorbents removed mainly magnesium, calcium and iron ions (Figure 3) from MPW1.


Advanced material and approach for metal ions removal from aqueous solutions.

Turhanen PA, Vepsäläinen JJ, Peräniemi S - Sci Rep (2015)

The total amounts of metals (mg/g) removed by N10O (A) or Diphonix® (D) from MWP1 sample (t = 24 h).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4355739&req=5

f3: The total amounts of metals (mg/g) removed by N10O (A) or Diphonix® (D) from MWP1 sample (t = 24 h).
Mentions: In the case of sample MPW1, the results indicate clearly that the amount of adsorbent used (10 g/l N10O and 30 g/l Diphonix® resin) were too low for this sample and would need to be increased. Only aluminum and copper ions were effectively removed with both adsorbents (also iron ions in the case of Diphonix® resin), whereas MnII, CoII, NiII, ZnII, and CdII ions were poorly collected (Table 5, Figure 3). The high removal per cent of CuII was not surprising since CuII ion had been previously observed to compete successfully in complex formation with other metals ions (Table 3). The percent removals of MnII, ZnII and CdII were higher with N10O whereas Diphonix® resin collected FeII/III and NiII ions more effectively, as expected on the basis of the capacity experiments. Instead, N10O collected less calcium and magnesium ions than Diphonix® resin which was somewhat surprising because N10O had higher Ca(II) and Mg(II) capacities (Table 2), but then again calcium and magnesium ions were almost last ones in bounding order (Table 3) and probably they lost the competition for coordination sites. On the whole, both adsorbents removed mainly magnesium, calcium and iron ions (Figure 3) from MPW1.

Bottom Line: The method is based on a resin free, solid, non-toxic, microcrystalline bisphosphonate material, which has very low solubility in water (59 mg/l to ion free Milli-Q water and 13 mg/l to 3.5% NaCl solution).The material has been produced almost quantitatively on a 1 kg scale (it has been prepared also on a pilot scale, ca. 7 kg) and tested successfully for its ability to collect metal cations from different sources, such as ground water and mining process waters.This material has several advantages compared to the currently used approaches, such as no need for any precipitation step.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Pharmacy,Biocenter Kuopio, University of Eastern Finland, P.O.Box 1627, FI-70211, Kuopio, Finland.

ABSTRACT
A Novel approach to remove metals from aqueous solutions has been developed. The method is based on a resin free, solid, non-toxic, microcrystalline bisphosphonate material, which has very low solubility in water (59 mg/l to ion free Milli-Q water and 13 mg/l to 3.5% NaCl solution). The material has been produced almost quantitatively on a 1 kg scale (it has been prepared also on a pilot scale, ca. 7 kg) and tested successfully for its ability to collect metal cations from different sources, such as ground water and mining process waters. Not only was this material highly efficient at collecting several metal ions out of solution it also proved to be regenerable and reusable over a number of adsorption/desorption, which is crucial for environmental friendliness. This material has several advantages compared to the currently used approaches, such as no need for any precipitation step.

No MeSH data available.