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Advanced material and approach for metal ions removal from aqueous solutions.

Turhanen PA, Vepsäläinen JJ, Peräniemi S - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The method is based on a resin free, solid, non-toxic, microcrystalline bisphosphonate material, which has very low solubility in water (59 mg/l to ion free Milli-Q water and 13 mg/l to 3.5% NaCl solution).The material has been produced almost quantitatively on a 1 kg scale (it has been prepared also on a pilot scale, ca. 7 kg) and tested successfully for its ability to collect metal cations from different sources, such as ground water and mining process waters.This material has several advantages compared to the currently used approaches, such as no need for any precipitation step.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Pharmacy,Biocenter Kuopio, University of Eastern Finland, P.O.Box 1627, FI-70211, Kuopio, Finland.

ABSTRACT
A Novel approach to remove metals from aqueous solutions has been developed. The method is based on a resin free, solid, non-toxic, microcrystalline bisphosphonate material, which has very low solubility in water (59 mg/l to ion free Milli-Q water and 13 mg/l to 3.5% NaCl solution). The material has been produced almost quantitatively on a 1 kg scale (it has been prepared also on a pilot scale, ca. 7 kg) and tested successfully for its ability to collect metal cations from different sources, such as ground water and mining process waters. Not only was this material highly efficient at collecting several metal ions out of solution it also proved to be regenerable and reusable over a number of adsorption/desorption, which is crucial for environmental friendliness. This material has several advantages compared to the currently used approaches, such as no need for any precipitation step.

No MeSH data available.


The effect of solution pH onto the metal capture (V = 100 ml, m(N10O) = 100 mg, c(Cu/Fe/Na) = 2 mg/l, c(Al) = 10 mg/l).
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f2: The effect of solution pH onto the metal capture (V = 100 ml, m(N10O) = 100 mg, c(Cu/Fe/Na) = 2 mg/l, c(Al) = 10 mg/l).

Mentions: The efficacy of collection of several transition metals by N10O (Table 1) was studied via recovery studies as a function of the pH value of the solution (pH 0.5–11) by the batch method with an excess of complexing agent. Alkali and alkaline earth elements and AlIII were also included since they are usually present in sample matrices. The pH graphs of these metal ions were observed to fall into four different classes (Figure 2). For the alkali metal ions, N10O proved to be an inefficient collector, since less than 5% of LiI, NaI, KI and CsI ions were bound at the mg/l level (see Figure 2 Na(I)). Instead, most of the metal ions (alkaline earth elements, CrIII, FeIII, CoII, NiII, ZnII and CdII) behaved similarly to the CuII ion: At highly acidic conditions they were not collected, probably because the binding sites on N10O are thought to be protonated, resulting in poor metal collection levels. At the optimum pH range, the binding sites are left partially unprotonated and maximal metal binding is possible over a wide range of pH values (Figure 2, Table 1). However, the lower pH limit of efficient collection differs from one metal ion to the next as can be seen from the pH1/2 values (pH1/2 is the pH value at which 50% of metal ions are collected) in Table 1. This feature could be useful in the separation of metal ions from each other (e.g. FeIII and CuII could be efficiently collected at lower pH's than the other metals) and the collected metal ions could probably be individually removed from N10O by washing it with acid solutions of varying strengths.


Advanced material and approach for metal ions removal from aqueous solutions.

Turhanen PA, Vepsäläinen JJ, Peräniemi S - Sci Rep (2015)

The effect of solution pH onto the metal capture (V = 100 ml, m(N10O) = 100 mg, c(Cu/Fe/Na) = 2 mg/l, c(Al) = 10 mg/l).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4355739&req=5

f2: The effect of solution pH onto the metal capture (V = 100 ml, m(N10O) = 100 mg, c(Cu/Fe/Na) = 2 mg/l, c(Al) = 10 mg/l).
Mentions: The efficacy of collection of several transition metals by N10O (Table 1) was studied via recovery studies as a function of the pH value of the solution (pH 0.5–11) by the batch method with an excess of complexing agent. Alkali and alkaline earth elements and AlIII were also included since they are usually present in sample matrices. The pH graphs of these metal ions were observed to fall into four different classes (Figure 2). For the alkali metal ions, N10O proved to be an inefficient collector, since less than 5% of LiI, NaI, KI and CsI ions were bound at the mg/l level (see Figure 2 Na(I)). Instead, most of the metal ions (alkaline earth elements, CrIII, FeIII, CoII, NiII, ZnII and CdII) behaved similarly to the CuII ion: At highly acidic conditions they were not collected, probably because the binding sites on N10O are thought to be protonated, resulting in poor metal collection levels. At the optimum pH range, the binding sites are left partially unprotonated and maximal metal binding is possible over a wide range of pH values (Figure 2, Table 1). However, the lower pH limit of efficient collection differs from one metal ion to the next as can be seen from the pH1/2 values (pH1/2 is the pH value at which 50% of metal ions are collected) in Table 1. This feature could be useful in the separation of metal ions from each other (e.g. FeIII and CuII could be efficiently collected at lower pH's than the other metals) and the collected metal ions could probably be individually removed from N10O by washing it with acid solutions of varying strengths.

Bottom Line: The method is based on a resin free, solid, non-toxic, microcrystalline bisphosphonate material, which has very low solubility in water (59 mg/l to ion free Milli-Q water and 13 mg/l to 3.5% NaCl solution).The material has been produced almost quantitatively on a 1 kg scale (it has been prepared also on a pilot scale, ca. 7 kg) and tested successfully for its ability to collect metal cations from different sources, such as ground water and mining process waters.This material has several advantages compared to the currently used approaches, such as no need for any precipitation step.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Pharmacy,Biocenter Kuopio, University of Eastern Finland, P.O.Box 1627, FI-70211, Kuopio, Finland.

ABSTRACT
A Novel approach to remove metals from aqueous solutions has been developed. The method is based on a resin free, solid, non-toxic, microcrystalline bisphosphonate material, which has very low solubility in water (59 mg/l to ion free Milli-Q water and 13 mg/l to 3.5% NaCl solution). The material has been produced almost quantitatively on a 1 kg scale (it has been prepared also on a pilot scale, ca. 7 kg) and tested successfully for its ability to collect metal cations from different sources, such as ground water and mining process waters. Not only was this material highly efficient at collecting several metal ions out of solution it also proved to be regenerable and reusable over a number of adsorption/desorption, which is crucial for environmental friendliness. This material has several advantages compared to the currently used approaches, such as no need for any precipitation step.

No MeSH data available.