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Pattern transformation of heat-shrinkable polymer by three-dimensional (3D) printing technique.

Zhang Q, Yan D, Zhang K, Hu G - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: A significant challenge in conventional heat-shrinkable polymers is to produce controllable microstructures.It is shown that a uniform internal strain is stored in the polymer during the printing process and can be released when heated above its glass transition temperature.Our work provides insightful ideas to understand a novel mechanism on the heat-shrinkable effect of printed material, but also to present a simple approach to fabricate heat-shrinkable polymer with a controllable thermo-structural response.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Aerospace Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, China.

ABSTRACT
A significant challenge in conventional heat-shrinkable polymers is to produce controllable microstructures. Here we report that the polymer material fabricated by three-dimensional (3D) printing technique has a heat-shrinkable property, whose initial microstructure can undergo a spontaneous pattern transformation under heating. The underlying mechanism is revealed by evaluating internal strain of the printed polymer from its fabricating process. It is shown that a uniform internal strain is stored in the polymer during the printing process and can be released when heated above its glass transition temperature. Furthermore, the internal strain can be used to trigger the pattern transformation of the heat-shrinkable polymer in a controllable way. Our work provides insightful ideas to understand a novel mechanism on the heat-shrinkable effect of printed material, but also to present a simple approach to fabricate heat-shrinkable polymer with a controllable thermo-structural response.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental data and corresponding theoretical strain-time curves (a) and maximum contracted strains (b) for PLA strips at building speed varying from 10 to 150 mm s−1. All of the strips contract after heating and the maximum contract strain is almost linear to the building speed from 30 to 120 mm s−1.
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f4: Experimental data and corresponding theoretical strain-time curves (a) and maximum contracted strains (b) for PLA strips at building speed varying from 10 to 150 mm s−1. All of the strips contract after heating and the maximum contract strain is almost linear to the building speed from 30 to 120 mm s−1.

Mentions: In order to explain the observed thermo-mechanical property of the printed polymer, a simple structure of long strip is studied and a viscoelastic model is proposed, consisting of a classical Voigt model (a spring f (Ef) and a dashpot (η) in parallel) and another spring e (Ee) connected in series (Fig. 3). PLA strips are printed with the size of 20 × 1.6 × 0.6 mm (length × height × thickness) at building speeds of 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 mm s−1, respectively. They were heated on the surface of a heating plate at 90°C. By calculating the ratio of the contraction to the initial length of the strips, we obtained the strains of the long strips at different time during the deformation process. More details on the experiment can be seen in method section and Supplementary Note. As shown in Fig. 4(a), all of the strips contracted after initial heating. The printed PLA material can shrink up to the maximum strain of 22.7% at the building speed of 150 mm s−1. We can also see that the maximum contracted strain is almost linear to the building speed v from 30 to 120 mm s−1, which is equal to 0.146 + 4.435 × 10−4v by linear fitting.


Pattern transformation of heat-shrinkable polymer by three-dimensional (3D) printing technique.

Zhang Q, Yan D, Zhang K, Hu G - Sci Rep (2015)

Experimental data and corresponding theoretical strain-time curves (a) and maximum contracted strains (b) for PLA strips at building speed varying from 10 to 150 mm s−1. All of the strips contract after heating and the maximum contract strain is almost linear to the building speed from 30 to 120 mm s−1.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4355736&req=5

f4: Experimental data and corresponding theoretical strain-time curves (a) and maximum contracted strains (b) for PLA strips at building speed varying from 10 to 150 mm s−1. All of the strips contract after heating and the maximum contract strain is almost linear to the building speed from 30 to 120 mm s−1.
Mentions: In order to explain the observed thermo-mechanical property of the printed polymer, a simple structure of long strip is studied and a viscoelastic model is proposed, consisting of a classical Voigt model (a spring f (Ef) and a dashpot (η) in parallel) and another spring e (Ee) connected in series (Fig. 3). PLA strips are printed with the size of 20 × 1.6 × 0.6 mm (length × height × thickness) at building speeds of 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 mm s−1, respectively. They were heated on the surface of a heating plate at 90°C. By calculating the ratio of the contraction to the initial length of the strips, we obtained the strains of the long strips at different time during the deformation process. More details on the experiment can be seen in method section and Supplementary Note. As shown in Fig. 4(a), all of the strips contracted after initial heating. The printed PLA material can shrink up to the maximum strain of 22.7% at the building speed of 150 mm s−1. We can also see that the maximum contracted strain is almost linear to the building speed v from 30 to 120 mm s−1, which is equal to 0.146 + 4.435 × 10−4v by linear fitting.

Bottom Line: A significant challenge in conventional heat-shrinkable polymers is to produce controllable microstructures.It is shown that a uniform internal strain is stored in the polymer during the printing process and can be released when heated above its glass transition temperature.Our work provides insightful ideas to understand a novel mechanism on the heat-shrinkable effect of printed material, but also to present a simple approach to fabricate heat-shrinkable polymer with a controllable thermo-structural response.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Aerospace Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, China.

ABSTRACT
A significant challenge in conventional heat-shrinkable polymers is to produce controllable microstructures. Here we report that the polymer material fabricated by three-dimensional (3D) printing technique has a heat-shrinkable property, whose initial microstructure can undergo a spontaneous pattern transformation under heating. The underlying mechanism is revealed by evaluating internal strain of the printed polymer from its fabricating process. It is shown that a uniform internal strain is stored in the polymer during the printing process and can be released when heated above its glass transition temperature. Furthermore, the internal strain can be used to trigger the pattern transformation of the heat-shrinkable polymer in a controllable way. Our work provides insightful ideas to understand a novel mechanism on the heat-shrinkable effect of printed material, but also to present a simple approach to fabricate heat-shrinkable polymer with a controllable thermo-structural response.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus