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Monolithic DSSC/CIGS tandem solar cell fabricated by a solution process.

Moon SH, Park SJ, Kim SH, Lee MW, Han J, Kim JY, Kim H, Hwang YJ, Lee DK, Min BK - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Tandem architecture between organic (dye-sensitized solar cell, DSSC) and inorganic (CuInGaSe2 thin film solar cell, CIGS) single-junction solar cells was constructed particularly based on a solution process.Arc-plasma deposition was employed for the Pt interfacial layer to minimize the damage to the layers of the CIGS bottom cell.Solar cell efficiency of 13% was achieved, which is significant progress from individual single-junction solar cells (e.g., 7.25 and 6.2% for DSSC and CIGS, respectively).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clean Energy Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarang-ro 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul. 136-791, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Tandem architecture between organic (dye-sensitized solar cell, DSSC) and inorganic (CuInGaSe2 thin film solar cell, CIGS) single-junction solar cells was constructed particularly based on a solution process. Arc-plasma deposition was employed for the Pt interfacial layer to minimize the damage to the layers of the CIGS bottom cell. Solar cell efficiency of 13% was achieved, which is significant progress from individual single-junction solar cells (e.g., 7.25 and 6.2% for DSSC and CIGS, respectively).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of Pt nanoparticles deposited on amorphous carbon films by the arc-plasma deposition (APD) method with different plasma pulses (a) 10, (b) 20, (c) 40, (d) 60, and (e) 80, and optical transmittance at 800 nm of APD-Pt layers on glass substrates (left y-axis in (f)) and conversion efficiencies of DSSCs with APD-Pt catalyst (right y-axis in (f)) as a function of the plasma pulses.
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f2: Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of Pt nanoparticles deposited on amorphous carbon films by the arc-plasma deposition (APD) method with different plasma pulses (a) 10, (b) 20, (c) 40, (d) 60, and (e) 80, and optical transmittance at 800 nm of APD-Pt layers on glass substrates (left y-axis in (f)) and conversion efficiencies of DSSCs with APD-Pt catalyst (right y-axis in (f)) as a function of the plasma pulses.

Mentions: As mentioned earlier, one of the most important components in the DSSC/CIGS tandem architecture is the Pt catalyst deposited on the AZO layer of a CIGS thin film solar cell. The APD method2425 involves the direct evaporation of a solid metal target into a highly ionized plasma pulse in vacuum (~3x10−5 Torr). The kinetic energy of the evaporated metal nanoparticles is relatively low (tens of eV), and hence these nanoparticles can be deposited onto a substrate without causing significant damage to the substrate surface. The pulsed deposition mode (i.e., enough idle time between plasma pulses) along with the low kinetic energy of the evaporated nanoparticles also prevents the temperature from increasing in the samples (<100°C). Another advantage of the APD method is that the amount of metal deposits can be controlled easily and accurately by changing deposition parameters such as the number of plasma pulses (n), the discharge condenser voltage (V), and the discharge condenser capacitance (C). Figs. 2a–e show transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of the Pt catalysts deposited using the APD method with different values of n (10, 20, 40, 60, and 80), where glass substrates with an amorphous carbon film were used for the coverage estimation. Isolated Pt nanoparticles with a diameter of ~2 nm were observed after 10 plasma pulses (Fig. 2a), and the density of Pt nanoparticles increases with an increase in the number of plasma pulses, resulting in an almost continuous Pt film after 60 pulses. The catalytic properties of the APD-deposited Pt layer was investigated in terms of the conversion efficiency of DSSCs incorporating APD-Pt catalysts with different values of n (Fig. 2f, filled squares), where the conversion efficiency increases with an increase in the number of plasma pulses. This result shows that more Pt catalysts with more plasma pulses would be beneficial to enhance the device performance of the single-junction DSSC. In the case of a DSSC/CIGS tandem solar cell, however, the optical transmittance of the catalytic layer is also very important, because it directly influences light harvesting by the bottom CIGS solar cell, and the resulting photocurrent generation. In this context, the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectra of Pt layers deposited on glass substrates using the APD method with different values of n have been investigated. Given that the bottom CIGS cell can only absorb photons that have passed through the top DSSC, transmittance values at 800 nm are compared (see Fig. 1). As shown in Fig. 2f (open squares), the optical transmittance at 800 nm decreases with an increase in the number of plasma pulses, especially after 40 pulses, which is consistent with the TEM analysis. Owing to the trade-off between the DSSC performance and light harvesting by the bottom CIGS, the optimal condition for the Pt deposition by APD was set to 40 pulses. It should be noted that the conversion efficiency of a DSSC with a Pt layer deposited by APD (40 pulses, 7.25 (±0.26)%) was slightly higher than that of a DSSC with Pt layer deposited by the conventional thermal sintering method (7.16%, see Supplementary Information, Fig. S1).


Monolithic DSSC/CIGS tandem solar cell fabricated by a solution process.

Moon SH, Park SJ, Kim SH, Lee MW, Han J, Kim JY, Kim H, Hwang YJ, Lee DK, Min BK - Sci Rep (2015)

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of Pt nanoparticles deposited on amorphous carbon films by the arc-plasma deposition (APD) method with different plasma pulses (a) 10, (b) 20, (c) 40, (d) 60, and (e) 80, and optical transmittance at 800 nm of APD-Pt layers on glass substrates (left y-axis in (f)) and conversion efficiencies of DSSCs with APD-Pt catalyst (right y-axis in (f)) as a function of the plasma pulses.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4355678&req=5

f2: Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of Pt nanoparticles deposited on amorphous carbon films by the arc-plasma deposition (APD) method with different plasma pulses (a) 10, (b) 20, (c) 40, (d) 60, and (e) 80, and optical transmittance at 800 nm of APD-Pt layers on glass substrates (left y-axis in (f)) and conversion efficiencies of DSSCs with APD-Pt catalyst (right y-axis in (f)) as a function of the plasma pulses.
Mentions: As mentioned earlier, one of the most important components in the DSSC/CIGS tandem architecture is the Pt catalyst deposited on the AZO layer of a CIGS thin film solar cell. The APD method2425 involves the direct evaporation of a solid metal target into a highly ionized plasma pulse in vacuum (~3x10−5 Torr). The kinetic energy of the evaporated metal nanoparticles is relatively low (tens of eV), and hence these nanoparticles can be deposited onto a substrate without causing significant damage to the substrate surface. The pulsed deposition mode (i.e., enough idle time between plasma pulses) along with the low kinetic energy of the evaporated nanoparticles also prevents the temperature from increasing in the samples (<100°C). Another advantage of the APD method is that the amount of metal deposits can be controlled easily and accurately by changing deposition parameters such as the number of plasma pulses (n), the discharge condenser voltage (V), and the discharge condenser capacitance (C). Figs. 2a–e show transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of the Pt catalysts deposited using the APD method with different values of n (10, 20, 40, 60, and 80), where glass substrates with an amorphous carbon film were used for the coverage estimation. Isolated Pt nanoparticles with a diameter of ~2 nm were observed after 10 plasma pulses (Fig. 2a), and the density of Pt nanoparticles increases with an increase in the number of plasma pulses, resulting in an almost continuous Pt film after 60 pulses. The catalytic properties of the APD-deposited Pt layer was investigated in terms of the conversion efficiency of DSSCs incorporating APD-Pt catalysts with different values of n (Fig. 2f, filled squares), where the conversion efficiency increases with an increase in the number of plasma pulses. This result shows that more Pt catalysts with more plasma pulses would be beneficial to enhance the device performance of the single-junction DSSC. In the case of a DSSC/CIGS tandem solar cell, however, the optical transmittance of the catalytic layer is also very important, because it directly influences light harvesting by the bottom CIGS solar cell, and the resulting photocurrent generation. In this context, the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectra of Pt layers deposited on glass substrates using the APD method with different values of n have been investigated. Given that the bottom CIGS cell can only absorb photons that have passed through the top DSSC, transmittance values at 800 nm are compared (see Fig. 1). As shown in Fig. 2f (open squares), the optical transmittance at 800 nm decreases with an increase in the number of plasma pulses, especially after 40 pulses, which is consistent with the TEM analysis. Owing to the trade-off between the DSSC performance and light harvesting by the bottom CIGS, the optimal condition for the Pt deposition by APD was set to 40 pulses. It should be noted that the conversion efficiency of a DSSC with a Pt layer deposited by APD (40 pulses, 7.25 (±0.26)%) was slightly higher than that of a DSSC with Pt layer deposited by the conventional thermal sintering method (7.16%, see Supplementary Information, Fig. S1).

Bottom Line: Tandem architecture between organic (dye-sensitized solar cell, DSSC) and inorganic (CuInGaSe2 thin film solar cell, CIGS) single-junction solar cells was constructed particularly based on a solution process.Arc-plasma deposition was employed for the Pt interfacial layer to minimize the damage to the layers of the CIGS bottom cell.Solar cell efficiency of 13% was achieved, which is significant progress from individual single-junction solar cells (e.g., 7.25 and 6.2% for DSSC and CIGS, respectively).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clean Energy Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarang-ro 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul. 136-791, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Tandem architecture between organic (dye-sensitized solar cell, DSSC) and inorganic (CuInGaSe2 thin film solar cell, CIGS) single-junction solar cells was constructed particularly based on a solution process. Arc-plasma deposition was employed for the Pt interfacial layer to minimize the damage to the layers of the CIGS bottom cell. Solar cell efficiency of 13% was achieved, which is significant progress from individual single-junction solar cells (e.g., 7.25 and 6.2% for DSSC and CIGS, respectively).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus