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Review of Anasillomos Londt, 1983 with the description of a new species (Insecta: Diptera: Asilidae).

Dikow T - Biodivers Data J (2015)

Bottom Line: The southern African assassin-fly genus Anasillomos Londt, 1983 is reviewed.A new species, Anasillomosjuergeni sp. n., is described from the Namib desert and represents the second species in the genus.Descriptions/re-descriptions, photographs, and identification keys are provided to aid in the identification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
The southern African assassin-fly genus Anasillomos Londt, 1983 is reviewed. A new species, Anasillomosjuergeni sp. n., is described from the Namib desert and represents the second species in the genus. Descriptions/re-descriptions, photographs, and identification keys are provided to aid in the identification. Distribution, occurrence in biodiversity hotspots sensu Conservation International, and seasonal incidence are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

large, mostly bare sand dunes at Gobabeb (23°34'17" S 015°02'52" E) (note perching A.juergeni sp. n. assassin fly in center)
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Figure 898269: large, mostly bare sand dunes at Gobabeb (23°34'17" S 015°02'52" E) (note perching A.juergeni sp. n. assassin fly in center)

Mentions: All recently collected specimens during field work at or near the Gobabeb Research and Training Center conducted in February 2012 were perching on sand. The majority of specimens were collected on the large sand dunes south of the station and Kuiseb river bed (Fig. 10a, b) while a few were encountered on the small dunes west of the Kuiseb river bed (Fig. 10c). The flies are very fast fliers and fly away even when one is several meters away. An attempt was made to photograph them in the field, but I was unable to get sufficiently close (see Fig. 10a with a fly in the center).


Review of Anasillomos Londt, 1983 with the description of a new species (Insecta: Diptera: Asilidae).

Dikow T - Biodivers Data J (2015)

large, mostly bare sand dunes at Gobabeb (23°34'17" S 015°02'52" E) (note perching A.juergeni sp. n. assassin fly in center)
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4355677&req=5

Figure 898269: large, mostly bare sand dunes at Gobabeb (23°34'17" S 015°02'52" E) (note perching A.juergeni sp. n. assassin fly in center)
Mentions: All recently collected specimens during field work at or near the Gobabeb Research and Training Center conducted in February 2012 were perching on sand. The majority of specimens were collected on the large sand dunes south of the station and Kuiseb river bed (Fig. 10a, b) while a few were encountered on the small dunes west of the Kuiseb river bed (Fig. 10c). The flies are very fast fliers and fly away even when one is several meters away. An attempt was made to photograph them in the field, but I was unable to get sufficiently close (see Fig. 10a with a fly in the center).

Bottom Line: The southern African assassin-fly genus Anasillomos Londt, 1983 is reviewed.A new species, Anasillomosjuergeni sp. n., is described from the Namib desert and represents the second species in the genus.Descriptions/re-descriptions, photographs, and identification keys are provided to aid in the identification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
The southern African assassin-fly genus Anasillomos Londt, 1983 is reviewed. A new species, Anasillomosjuergeni sp. n., is described from the Namib desert and represents the second species in the genus. Descriptions/re-descriptions, photographs, and identification keys are provided to aid in the identification. Distribution, occurrence in biodiversity hotspots sensu Conservation International, and seasonal incidence are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus