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Transient cortical blindness following vertebral angiography: a case report.

Lo LW, Chan HF, Ma KF, Cheng LF, Chan TK - Neurointervention (2015)

Bottom Line: Transient cortical blindness (TCB) is a rare but well-known complication of cerebral angiography.Patient's vision was resumed spontaneously within 24 hours after angiography, with no residual neurological deficit in subsequent clinical follow up.Multi-modality imaging evaluation including vertebral angiography, brain CT and MRI performed on same day are presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
Transient cortical blindness (TCB) is a rare but well-known complication of cerebral angiography. Its pathophysiology remains uncertain. We would like to report a case of TCB in a patient during a follow up vertebral angiogram for post-coil embolization of left posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm. Patient's vision was resumed spontaneously within 24 hours after angiography, with no residual neurological deficit in subsequent clinical follow up. Multi-modality imaging evaluation including vertebral angiography, brain CT and MRI performed on same day are presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Brain CT obtained 2 hours after angiography shows no evidence of acute infarction or intracranial hemorrhage.
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Figure 2: Brain CT obtained 2 hours after angiography shows no evidence of acute infarction or intracranial hemorrhage.

Mentions: Urgent non-contrast brain CT was performed within 2 hours after angiography and showed no evidence of acute infarction over bilateral parieto-occipital cortex (Fig. 2). Brain MRI was arranged within 3 hours after angiography and demonstrated no abnormality on T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and post-gadolinium T1-weighted images. Post-gadolinium FLAIR MR images showed abnormal high signal over sulcal spaces of bilateral parieto-occipital lobes (Fig. 3). No restricted diffusion was seen on diffusion weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient (Fig. 4). Assessment by an ophthalmologist revealed no local cause of sudden visual loss. Short course of steroid was given. Patient's vision was normalized within 24 hours after vertebral angiography. Patient was discharged one week later with no residual neurological deficit.


Transient cortical blindness following vertebral angiography: a case report.

Lo LW, Chan HF, Ma KF, Cheng LF, Chan TK - Neurointervention (2015)

Brain CT obtained 2 hours after angiography shows no evidence of acute infarction or intracranial hemorrhage.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4355645&req=5

Figure 2: Brain CT obtained 2 hours after angiography shows no evidence of acute infarction or intracranial hemorrhage.
Mentions: Urgent non-contrast brain CT was performed within 2 hours after angiography and showed no evidence of acute infarction over bilateral parieto-occipital cortex (Fig. 2). Brain MRI was arranged within 3 hours after angiography and demonstrated no abnormality on T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and post-gadolinium T1-weighted images. Post-gadolinium FLAIR MR images showed abnormal high signal over sulcal spaces of bilateral parieto-occipital lobes (Fig. 3). No restricted diffusion was seen on diffusion weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient (Fig. 4). Assessment by an ophthalmologist revealed no local cause of sudden visual loss. Short course of steroid was given. Patient's vision was normalized within 24 hours after vertebral angiography. Patient was discharged one week later with no residual neurological deficit.

Bottom Line: Transient cortical blindness (TCB) is a rare but well-known complication of cerebral angiography.Patient's vision was resumed spontaneously within 24 hours after angiography, with no residual neurological deficit in subsequent clinical follow up.Multi-modality imaging evaluation including vertebral angiography, brain CT and MRI performed on same day are presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
Transient cortical blindness (TCB) is a rare but well-known complication of cerebral angiography. Its pathophysiology remains uncertain. We would like to report a case of TCB in a patient during a follow up vertebral angiogram for post-coil embolization of left posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm. Patient's vision was resumed spontaneously within 24 hours after angiography, with no residual neurological deficit in subsequent clinical follow up. Multi-modality imaging evaluation including vertebral angiography, brain CT and MRI performed on same day are presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus