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Fe(NO3)3-assisted large-scale synthesis of Si₃N₄ nanobelts from quartz and graphite by carbothermal reduction-nitridation and their photoluminescence properties.

Liu S, Fang M, Huang Z, Huang J, Ji H, Liu H, Liu YG, Wu X - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The large-scale synthesis of Si3N4 nanobelts from quartz and graphite on a graphite-felt substrate was successfully achieved by catalyst-assisted carbothermal reduction-nitridation.The Fe(NO3)3 played a crucial role in promoting the nanobelt formation in the initial stage.The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of Si3N4 nanobelts consists of three emission peaks centered at 413, 437, and 462 nm, indicating potential applications in optoelectronic nanodevices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Materials Science and Technology, Beijing Key Laboratory of Materials Utilization of Nonmetallic Minerals and Solid Wastes, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, China University of Geosciences, Beijing, 100083.

ABSTRACT
The large-scale synthesis of Si3N4 nanobelts from quartz and graphite on a graphite-felt substrate was successfully achieved by catalyst-assisted carbothermal reduction-nitridation. The phase composition, morphology, and microstructure of Si3N4 nanobelts were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The Si3N4 nanobelts were ~4-5 mm long and ~60 nm thick and exhibited smooth surfaces and flexible shapes. The Si3N4 nanobelts were well crystallized and grow along the [101] direction. The growth is dominated by the combined mechanisms of vapor-liquid-solid base growth and vapor-solid tip growth. The Fe(NO3)3 played a crucial role in promoting the nanobelt formation in the initial stage. The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of Si3N4 nanobelts consists of three emission peaks centered at 413, 437, and 462 nm, indicating potential applications in optoelectronic nanodevices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) TEM image. (b) EDS pattern of α-Si3N4 nanobelts. (c) High magnification TEM of an individual α-Si3N4 nanobelt. (d) High resolution TEM image and fast Fourier transformation (FFT) image (insert) of the α-Si3N4 nanobelt.
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f4: (a) TEM image. (b) EDS pattern of α-Si3N4 nanobelts. (c) High magnification TEM of an individual α-Si3N4 nanobelt. (d) High resolution TEM image and fast Fourier transformation (FFT) image (insert) of the α-Si3N4 nanobelt.

Mentions: The crystal structure of the Si3N4 nanobelts was further investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Figs. 4a and 4c show that the width of nanobelts along the length direction is consistent. The EDS result shows that the nanobelts contain Si and N in the atomic ratio of 0.754:1, close to the stoichiometric ratio in Si3N4 (0.750:1) (Fig. 4b). Minor C and O peaks appeared due to a porous carbon membrane on the copper grid and raw quartz supplies. A typical HRTEM image of a single Si3N4 nanobelt is shown in Fig. 4d. The clear lattice fringes show that the nanobelts were well crystallized. Moreover, lattice-fringe spacings of 0.67 nm and 0.56 nm conformed well to the (001) and (100) planes of α-Si3N4, respectively. The inset of Fig. 4d shows the corresponding selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, in which regular separated diffraction spots also showed a well-crystalline structure. Furthermore, the extension direction of α-Si3N4 nanobelts coincided with the [101] crystal axis, indicating that the crystal growth direction of α-Si3N4 nanobelts is the [101] direction. In contrast to the clear α-Si3N4 nanobelts, β-Si3N4 were not observed under the HRTEM, even though the XRD result showed their existence.


Fe(NO3)3-assisted large-scale synthesis of Si₃N₄ nanobelts from quartz and graphite by carbothermal reduction-nitridation and their photoluminescence properties.

Liu S, Fang M, Huang Z, Huang J, Ji H, Liu H, Liu YG, Wu X - Sci Rep (2015)

(a) TEM image. (b) EDS pattern of α-Si3N4 nanobelts. (c) High magnification TEM of an individual α-Si3N4 nanobelt. (d) High resolution TEM image and fast Fourier transformation (FFT) image (insert) of the α-Si3N4 nanobelt.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4355634&req=5

f4: (a) TEM image. (b) EDS pattern of α-Si3N4 nanobelts. (c) High magnification TEM of an individual α-Si3N4 nanobelt. (d) High resolution TEM image and fast Fourier transformation (FFT) image (insert) of the α-Si3N4 nanobelt.
Mentions: The crystal structure of the Si3N4 nanobelts was further investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Figs. 4a and 4c show that the width of nanobelts along the length direction is consistent. The EDS result shows that the nanobelts contain Si and N in the atomic ratio of 0.754:1, close to the stoichiometric ratio in Si3N4 (0.750:1) (Fig. 4b). Minor C and O peaks appeared due to a porous carbon membrane on the copper grid and raw quartz supplies. A typical HRTEM image of a single Si3N4 nanobelt is shown in Fig. 4d. The clear lattice fringes show that the nanobelts were well crystallized. Moreover, lattice-fringe spacings of 0.67 nm and 0.56 nm conformed well to the (001) and (100) planes of α-Si3N4, respectively. The inset of Fig. 4d shows the corresponding selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, in which regular separated diffraction spots also showed a well-crystalline structure. Furthermore, the extension direction of α-Si3N4 nanobelts coincided with the [101] crystal axis, indicating that the crystal growth direction of α-Si3N4 nanobelts is the [101] direction. In contrast to the clear α-Si3N4 nanobelts, β-Si3N4 were not observed under the HRTEM, even though the XRD result showed their existence.

Bottom Line: The large-scale synthesis of Si3N4 nanobelts from quartz and graphite on a graphite-felt substrate was successfully achieved by catalyst-assisted carbothermal reduction-nitridation.The Fe(NO3)3 played a crucial role in promoting the nanobelt formation in the initial stage.The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of Si3N4 nanobelts consists of three emission peaks centered at 413, 437, and 462 nm, indicating potential applications in optoelectronic nanodevices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Materials Science and Technology, Beijing Key Laboratory of Materials Utilization of Nonmetallic Minerals and Solid Wastes, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, China University of Geosciences, Beijing, 100083.

ABSTRACT
The large-scale synthesis of Si3N4 nanobelts from quartz and graphite on a graphite-felt substrate was successfully achieved by catalyst-assisted carbothermal reduction-nitridation. The phase composition, morphology, and microstructure of Si3N4 nanobelts were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The Si3N4 nanobelts were ~4-5 mm long and ~60 nm thick and exhibited smooth surfaces and flexible shapes. The Si3N4 nanobelts were well crystallized and grow along the [101] direction. The growth is dominated by the combined mechanisms of vapor-liquid-solid base growth and vapor-solid tip growth. The Fe(NO3)3 played a crucial role in promoting the nanobelt formation in the initial stage. The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of Si3N4 nanobelts consists of three emission peaks centered at 413, 437, and 462 nm, indicating potential applications in optoelectronic nanodevices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus