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Fe(NO3)3-assisted large-scale synthesis of Si₃N₄ nanobelts from quartz and graphite by carbothermal reduction-nitridation and their photoluminescence properties.

Liu S, Fang M, Huang Z, Huang J, Ji H, Liu H, Liu YG, Wu X - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The large-scale synthesis of Si3N4 nanobelts from quartz and graphite on a graphite-felt substrate was successfully achieved by catalyst-assisted carbothermal reduction-nitridation.The Fe(NO3)3 played a crucial role in promoting the nanobelt formation in the initial stage.The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of Si3N4 nanobelts consists of three emission peaks centered at 413, 437, and 462 nm, indicating potential applications in optoelectronic nanodevices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Materials Science and Technology, Beijing Key Laboratory of Materials Utilization of Nonmetallic Minerals and Solid Wastes, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, China University of Geosciences, Beijing, 100083.

ABSTRACT
The large-scale synthesis of Si3N4 nanobelts from quartz and graphite on a graphite-felt substrate was successfully achieved by catalyst-assisted carbothermal reduction-nitridation. The phase composition, morphology, and microstructure of Si3N4 nanobelts were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The Si3N4 nanobelts were ~4-5 mm long and ~60 nm thick and exhibited smooth surfaces and flexible shapes. The Si3N4 nanobelts were well crystallized and grow along the [101] direction. The growth is dominated by the combined mechanisms of vapor-liquid-solid base growth and vapor-solid tip growth. The Fe(NO3)3 played a crucial role in promoting the nanobelt formation in the initial stage. The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of Si3N4 nanobelts consists of three emission peaks centered at 413, 437, and 462 nm, indicating potential applications in optoelectronic nanodevices.

No MeSH data available.


FT-IR spectrum of the products detached from the graphite felt.
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f2: FT-IR spectrum of the products detached from the graphite felt.

Mentions: After removing from the vacuum furnace, a layer of white-color product was observed on the upper side of the graphite-felt substrate, which was designed on the top of the graphite crucible as a substrate. When carefully lifted with tweezers, the underside of the substrate was also covered with similar product. For further characterization, the synthesized product was peeled from the graphite-felt substrate. Compared to the conventional methods where the raw material was mixed with the catalyst, the separation of product and raw material simplified the purification procedure. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of the product (Fig. 1) showed that both the α-Si3N4 and β-Si3N4 were present in the cotton-like product. As shown in the XRD pattern, all the lines of α-Si3N4 from 10 to 80° could be indexed to α-Si3N4 (JCPDS Card No. 76-1407), whereas the main lines of β-Si3N4 were identified at the lower-angle regions (JCPDS Card No. 82-698). A broad bulge between 15° and 35° originated from the glass substrate used to load the product. The phase composition of Si3N4 was further confirmed by FT-IR spectrum as shown in Fig. 2. A series of absorption peaks from 800 to 1100 cm−1 can be attributed to the Si–N–Si skeletal vibration of Si3N41617. Some unbiased testimony can be obtained from the region 450–700 cm−1, known as the fingerprint region of an IR spectrum. Representative peaks were observed at 684, 600, and 460 cm−1, because of the formation of α-Si3N4 phase1819. Simultaneously, a sharp peak at 579 cm−1 can be attributed to the difference between α- and β-Si3N4, which was used to quantitatively determine the amount of the two types of Si3N420.


Fe(NO3)3-assisted large-scale synthesis of Si₃N₄ nanobelts from quartz and graphite by carbothermal reduction-nitridation and their photoluminescence properties.

Liu S, Fang M, Huang Z, Huang J, Ji H, Liu H, Liu YG, Wu X - Sci Rep (2015)

FT-IR spectrum of the products detached from the graphite felt.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4355634&req=5

f2: FT-IR spectrum of the products detached from the graphite felt.
Mentions: After removing from the vacuum furnace, a layer of white-color product was observed on the upper side of the graphite-felt substrate, which was designed on the top of the graphite crucible as a substrate. When carefully lifted with tweezers, the underside of the substrate was also covered with similar product. For further characterization, the synthesized product was peeled from the graphite-felt substrate. Compared to the conventional methods where the raw material was mixed with the catalyst, the separation of product and raw material simplified the purification procedure. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of the product (Fig. 1) showed that both the α-Si3N4 and β-Si3N4 were present in the cotton-like product. As shown in the XRD pattern, all the lines of α-Si3N4 from 10 to 80° could be indexed to α-Si3N4 (JCPDS Card No. 76-1407), whereas the main lines of β-Si3N4 were identified at the lower-angle regions (JCPDS Card No. 82-698). A broad bulge between 15° and 35° originated from the glass substrate used to load the product. The phase composition of Si3N4 was further confirmed by FT-IR spectrum as shown in Fig. 2. A series of absorption peaks from 800 to 1100 cm−1 can be attributed to the Si–N–Si skeletal vibration of Si3N41617. Some unbiased testimony can be obtained from the region 450–700 cm−1, known as the fingerprint region of an IR spectrum. Representative peaks were observed at 684, 600, and 460 cm−1, because of the formation of α-Si3N4 phase1819. Simultaneously, a sharp peak at 579 cm−1 can be attributed to the difference between α- and β-Si3N4, which was used to quantitatively determine the amount of the two types of Si3N420.

Bottom Line: The large-scale synthesis of Si3N4 nanobelts from quartz and graphite on a graphite-felt substrate was successfully achieved by catalyst-assisted carbothermal reduction-nitridation.The Fe(NO3)3 played a crucial role in promoting the nanobelt formation in the initial stage.The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of Si3N4 nanobelts consists of three emission peaks centered at 413, 437, and 462 nm, indicating potential applications in optoelectronic nanodevices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Materials Science and Technology, Beijing Key Laboratory of Materials Utilization of Nonmetallic Minerals and Solid Wastes, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, China University of Geosciences, Beijing, 100083.

ABSTRACT
The large-scale synthesis of Si3N4 nanobelts from quartz and graphite on a graphite-felt substrate was successfully achieved by catalyst-assisted carbothermal reduction-nitridation. The phase composition, morphology, and microstructure of Si3N4 nanobelts were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The Si3N4 nanobelts were ~4-5 mm long and ~60 nm thick and exhibited smooth surfaces and flexible shapes. The Si3N4 nanobelts were well crystallized and grow along the [101] direction. The growth is dominated by the combined mechanisms of vapor-liquid-solid base growth and vapor-solid tip growth. The Fe(NO3)3 played a crucial role in promoting the nanobelt formation in the initial stage. The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of Si3N4 nanobelts consists of three emission peaks centered at 413, 437, and 462 nm, indicating potential applications in optoelectronic nanodevices.

No MeSH data available.