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Mobile dune fixation by a fast-growing clonal plant: a full life-cycle analysis.

Li SL, Yu FH, Werger MJ, Dong M, During HJ, Zuidema PA - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Elasticity analysis revealed that clonal propagation was the key contributor to population growth.The capacity of high clonal propagation and rapid population expansion in mobile dunes makes H. laeve a suitable species to combat desertification.Species with similar life-history traits to H. laeve are likely to offer good opportunities for stabilizing active dunes in arid inland ecosystems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] State Key Laboratory of Vegetation and Environmental Change, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093, China [2] Ecology &Biodiversity Group, Institute of Environmental Biology, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80084, 3508 TB Utrecht, the Netherlands [3] Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, 20014 Turku, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Desertification is a global environmental problem, and arid dunes with sparse vegetation are especially vulnerable to desertification. One way to combat desertification is to increase vegetation cover by planting plant species that can realize fast population expansion, even in harsh environments. To evaluate the success of planted species and provide guidance for selecting proper species to stabilize active dunes, demographic studies in natural habitats are essential. We studied the life history traits and population dynamics of a dominant clonal shrub Hedysarum laeve in Inner-Mongolia, northern China. Vital rates of 19057 ramets were recorded during three annual censuses (2007-2009) and used to parameterize Integral Projection Models to analyse population dynamics. The life history of H. laeve was characterized by high ramet turnover and population recruitment entirely depended on clonal propagation. Stochastic population growth rate was 1.32, suggesting that the populations were experiencing rapid expansion. Elasticity analysis revealed that clonal propagation was the key contributor to population growth. The capacity of high clonal propagation and rapid population expansion in mobile dunes makes H. laeve a suitable species to combat desertification. Species with similar life-history traits to H. laeve are likely to offer good opportunities for stabilizing active dunes in arid inland ecosystems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Vital rate elasticity for Hedysarum laeve in Mu Us Sandland during 2007–2008 (a) and 2008–2009 (b).
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f3: Vital rate elasticity for Hedysarum laeve in Mu Us Sandland during 2007–2008 (a) and 2008–2009 (b).

Mentions: Elasticity analyses showed that the population growth rate was most sensitive to changes in clonal propagation (Fig. 3a, b, both years) followed by survival (Fig. 3b, second year, Supplementary Table S1). The analysis of the Life Table Response Experiment (LTRE), which quantifies the contribution of each vital rate to the observed difference in population growth rates, showed that the lower λ in the first census period was attributed mainly to lower survival (explaining 67% of variation), and to a lesser extent to variations arising from growth (17%), shrinkage (10%) and clonal propagation (6%; Fig. 4). The relative contributions of vital rates to variation in population growth rates were distributed unevenly across individuals with different sizes. The contributions of survival and growth were mainly due to plant individuals of 50–100 cm, that of shrinkage mainly due to individuals of 70–150 cm, and that of clonal propagation mainly due to the recruitment of new ramets shorter than 70 cm.


Mobile dune fixation by a fast-growing clonal plant: a full life-cycle analysis.

Li SL, Yu FH, Werger MJ, Dong M, During HJ, Zuidema PA - Sci Rep (2015)

Vital rate elasticity for Hedysarum laeve in Mu Us Sandland during 2007–2008 (a) and 2008–2009 (b).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4355633&req=5

f3: Vital rate elasticity for Hedysarum laeve in Mu Us Sandland during 2007–2008 (a) and 2008–2009 (b).
Mentions: Elasticity analyses showed that the population growth rate was most sensitive to changes in clonal propagation (Fig. 3a, b, both years) followed by survival (Fig. 3b, second year, Supplementary Table S1). The analysis of the Life Table Response Experiment (LTRE), which quantifies the contribution of each vital rate to the observed difference in population growth rates, showed that the lower λ in the first census period was attributed mainly to lower survival (explaining 67% of variation), and to a lesser extent to variations arising from growth (17%), shrinkage (10%) and clonal propagation (6%; Fig. 4). The relative contributions of vital rates to variation in population growth rates were distributed unevenly across individuals with different sizes. The contributions of survival and growth were mainly due to plant individuals of 50–100 cm, that of shrinkage mainly due to individuals of 70–150 cm, and that of clonal propagation mainly due to the recruitment of new ramets shorter than 70 cm.

Bottom Line: Elasticity analysis revealed that clonal propagation was the key contributor to population growth.The capacity of high clonal propagation and rapid population expansion in mobile dunes makes H. laeve a suitable species to combat desertification.Species with similar life-history traits to H. laeve are likely to offer good opportunities for stabilizing active dunes in arid inland ecosystems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] State Key Laboratory of Vegetation and Environmental Change, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093, China [2] Ecology &Biodiversity Group, Institute of Environmental Biology, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80084, 3508 TB Utrecht, the Netherlands [3] Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, 20014 Turku, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Desertification is a global environmental problem, and arid dunes with sparse vegetation are especially vulnerable to desertification. One way to combat desertification is to increase vegetation cover by planting plant species that can realize fast population expansion, even in harsh environments. To evaluate the success of planted species and provide guidance for selecting proper species to stabilize active dunes, demographic studies in natural habitats are essential. We studied the life history traits and population dynamics of a dominant clonal shrub Hedysarum laeve in Inner-Mongolia, northern China. Vital rates of 19057 ramets were recorded during three annual censuses (2007-2009) and used to parameterize Integral Projection Models to analyse population dynamics. The life history of H. laeve was characterized by high ramet turnover and population recruitment entirely depended on clonal propagation. Stochastic population growth rate was 1.32, suggesting that the populations were experiencing rapid expansion. Elasticity analysis revealed that clonal propagation was the key contributor to population growth. The capacity of high clonal propagation and rapid population expansion in mobile dunes makes H. laeve a suitable species to combat desertification. Species with similar life-history traits to H. laeve are likely to offer good opportunities for stabilizing active dunes in arid inland ecosystems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus