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Superior vena cava syndrome and colon carcinoma: a report of a multifactorial association.

Espírito Santo J, Coutinho I, Pimentel A, Garcia R, Marques Dos Santos R - Case Rep Oncol Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Cancer is associated with an increased risk of thromboembolism that varies according to patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors.The authors present a case of a 58-year-old male with an infrequent presentation of an unknown colon carcinoma, who has never had any symptom until he was hospitalized with the diagnosis of superior vena cava syndrome and pulmonary thromboembolism.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Internal Medicine Department A, University Hospital Center of Coimbra, 3000-075 Coimbra, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
Introduction. Superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome results from the obstruction of blood flow through the SVC, having distinct pathophysiological underlying mechanisms. Cancer is associated with an increased risk of thromboembolism that varies according to patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors. An individualized clinical approach is important to pursue the accurate diagnosis of the underlying pathology causing thromboembolism in cancer patients. Case Presentation. The authors present a case of a 58-year-old male with an infrequent presentation of an unknown colon carcinoma, who has never had any symptom until he was hospitalized with the diagnosis of superior vena cava syndrome and pulmonary thromboembolism. The patient had an advanced disease by the time of diagnosis and molecular alterations contributing to abnormal hemostasis. He presented venous and arterial thromboembolism and developed disseminated intravascular coagulopathy after surgery, anticoagulant and transfusion therapy, dying 40 days after the hospitalization. Conclusion. The authors discuss thromboembolic disease and tumor metastasis roles in a cancer patient with SVC syndrome. Thromboembolism in a malignancy context is a challenging clinical entity. A multifactorial perspective of the thrombotic disease is warranted to approach thromboembolism risk and stratify patients suitable to receive adequate anticoagulant prophylaxis and targeted therapies, aiming to improve clinical prognosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Physical examination: upper left limb edema with visible collateral veins above left clavicle and in the left arm.
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fig1: Physical examination: upper left limb edema with visible collateral veins above left clavicle and in the left arm.

Mentions: A 58-year-old man with a week history of mild dyspnea and chest pain, diffuse abdominal pain with back irradiation, fatigue, and anorexia was referred to our hospital with sudden swelling and pain of the head, neck, and upper left limb. He was obese (Grade 1, BMI 34,5 Kg/m2) and had no other relevant medical history known. On physical examination, he was oriented, hemodynamically stable, and acyanotic and had face, neck, and upper left limb painful edema with visible collateral veins above left clavicle and diffuse abdominal pain, without signs of peritoneal irritation. Heart and lung examination revealed no abnormalities (Figure 1).


Superior vena cava syndrome and colon carcinoma: a report of a multifactorial association.

Espírito Santo J, Coutinho I, Pimentel A, Garcia R, Marques Dos Santos R - Case Rep Oncol Med (2015)

Physical examination: upper left limb edema with visible collateral veins above left clavicle and in the left arm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4355600&req=5

fig1: Physical examination: upper left limb edema with visible collateral veins above left clavicle and in the left arm.
Mentions: A 58-year-old man with a week history of mild dyspnea and chest pain, diffuse abdominal pain with back irradiation, fatigue, and anorexia was referred to our hospital with sudden swelling and pain of the head, neck, and upper left limb. He was obese (Grade 1, BMI 34,5 Kg/m2) and had no other relevant medical history known. On physical examination, he was oriented, hemodynamically stable, and acyanotic and had face, neck, and upper left limb painful edema with visible collateral veins above left clavicle and diffuse abdominal pain, without signs of peritoneal irritation. Heart and lung examination revealed no abnormalities (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Cancer is associated with an increased risk of thromboembolism that varies according to patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors.The authors present a case of a 58-year-old male with an infrequent presentation of an unknown colon carcinoma, who has never had any symptom until he was hospitalized with the diagnosis of superior vena cava syndrome and pulmonary thromboembolism.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Internal Medicine Department A, University Hospital Center of Coimbra, 3000-075 Coimbra, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
Introduction. Superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome results from the obstruction of blood flow through the SVC, having distinct pathophysiological underlying mechanisms. Cancer is associated with an increased risk of thromboembolism that varies according to patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors. An individualized clinical approach is important to pursue the accurate diagnosis of the underlying pathology causing thromboembolism in cancer patients. Case Presentation. The authors present a case of a 58-year-old male with an infrequent presentation of an unknown colon carcinoma, who has never had any symptom until he was hospitalized with the diagnosis of superior vena cava syndrome and pulmonary thromboembolism. The patient had an advanced disease by the time of diagnosis and molecular alterations contributing to abnormal hemostasis. He presented venous and arterial thromboembolism and developed disseminated intravascular coagulopathy after surgery, anticoagulant and transfusion therapy, dying 40 days after the hospitalization. Conclusion. The authors discuss thromboembolic disease and tumor metastasis roles in a cancer patient with SVC syndrome. Thromboembolism in a malignancy context is a challenging clinical entity. A multifactorial perspective of the thrombotic disease is warranted to approach thromboembolism risk and stratify patients suitable to receive adequate anticoagulant prophylaxis and targeted therapies, aiming to improve clinical prognosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus