Limits...
Socioeconomic disadvantage in childhood as a predictor of excessive gestational weight gain and obesity in midlife adulthood.

Chaffee BW, Abrams B, Cohen AK, Rehkopf DH - Emerg Themes Epidemiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was not statistically significantly associated with excessive GWG in any group.Controlled direct effects were not consistently weaker than total effects.Prevention of excessive GWG may benefit all groups through reducing obesity, but excessive GWG does not appear to serve as a mediator between childhood socioeconomic position and adult obesity in women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Oral Epidemiology and Dental Public Health, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Lower childhood socioeconomic position is associated with greater risk of adult obesity among women, but not men. Pregnancy-related weight changes may contribute to this gender difference. The objectives of this study were to determine the associations between: 1. childhood socioeconomic disadvantage and midlife obesity; 2. excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) and midlife obesity; and 3. childhood socioeconomic disadvantage and excessive GWG, among a representative sample of childbearing women.

Methods: We constructed marginal structural models for seven measures of childhood socioeconomic position for 4780 parous women in the United States, using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979-2010) data. Institute of Medicine definitions were used for excessive GWG; body mass index ≥30 at age 40 defined midlife obesity. Analyses were separated by race/ethnicity. Additionally, we estimated controlled direct effects of childhood socioeconomic disadvantage on midlife obesity under a condition of never gaining excessively in pregnancy.

Results: Low parental education, but not other measures of childhood disadvantage, was associated with greater midlife obesity among non-black non-Hispanic women. Among black and Hispanic mothers, childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was not consistently associated with midlife obesity. Excessive GWG was associated with greater midlife obesity in all racial/ethnic groups. Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was not statistically significantly associated with excessive GWG in any group. Controlled direct effects were not consistently weaker than total effects.

Conclusions: Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with adult obesity, but not with excessive gestational weight gain, and only for certain disadvantage measures among non-black non-Hispanic mothers. Prevention of excessive GWG may benefit all groups through reducing obesity, but excessive GWG does not appear to serve as a mediator between childhood socioeconomic position and adult obesity in women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Estimated Population-Average Effect of Childhood Socioeconomic Adversity on Excessive Gestational Weight Gain. Legend: Each pair of symbols represents the adjusted prevalence of lifetime history of ever experiencing excessive gestational weight gain among parous women in the NLSY 1979–2010 cohort under two conditions: had the entire cohort experienced childhood socioeconomic adversity (right symbol), or had no one in the cohort experienced childhood socioeconomic adversity (left symbol), from seven different marginal structural models based on seven different indicators of socioeconomic position. CI = confidence interval; GWG = gestational weight gain.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4353468&req=5

Fig4: Estimated Population-Average Effect of Childhood Socioeconomic Adversity on Excessive Gestational Weight Gain. Legend: Each pair of symbols represents the adjusted prevalence of lifetime history of ever experiencing excessive gestational weight gain among parous women in the NLSY 1979–2010 cohort under two conditions: had the entire cohort experienced childhood socioeconomic adversity (right symbol), or had no one in the cohort experienced childhood socioeconomic adversity (left symbol), from seven different marginal structural models based on seven different indicators of socioeconomic position. CI = confidence interval; GWG = gestational weight gain.

Mentions: None of the measures of childhood socioeconomic disadvantage were associated with ever experiencing excessive GWG to a statistically significant extent in any racial/ethnic group (Figure 4, Table 2). Of these non-statistically significant associations, the strongest positive associations occurred with low parental educational attainment among non-black Hispanic mothers. Other measures, such as low household income among non-Hispanic black mothers, and less than full-time paternal employment and blue-collar paternal occupation among non-black Hispanic mothers had inverse associations with excessive GWG.Figure 4


Socioeconomic disadvantage in childhood as a predictor of excessive gestational weight gain and obesity in midlife adulthood.

Chaffee BW, Abrams B, Cohen AK, Rehkopf DH - Emerg Themes Epidemiol (2015)

Estimated Population-Average Effect of Childhood Socioeconomic Adversity on Excessive Gestational Weight Gain. Legend: Each pair of symbols represents the adjusted prevalence of lifetime history of ever experiencing excessive gestational weight gain among parous women in the NLSY 1979–2010 cohort under two conditions: had the entire cohort experienced childhood socioeconomic adversity (right symbol), or had no one in the cohort experienced childhood socioeconomic adversity (left symbol), from seven different marginal structural models based on seven different indicators of socioeconomic position. CI = confidence interval; GWG = gestational weight gain.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4353468&req=5

Fig4: Estimated Population-Average Effect of Childhood Socioeconomic Adversity on Excessive Gestational Weight Gain. Legend: Each pair of symbols represents the adjusted prevalence of lifetime history of ever experiencing excessive gestational weight gain among parous women in the NLSY 1979–2010 cohort under two conditions: had the entire cohort experienced childhood socioeconomic adversity (right symbol), or had no one in the cohort experienced childhood socioeconomic adversity (left symbol), from seven different marginal structural models based on seven different indicators of socioeconomic position. CI = confidence interval; GWG = gestational weight gain.
Mentions: None of the measures of childhood socioeconomic disadvantage were associated with ever experiencing excessive GWG to a statistically significant extent in any racial/ethnic group (Figure 4, Table 2). Of these non-statistically significant associations, the strongest positive associations occurred with low parental educational attainment among non-black Hispanic mothers. Other measures, such as low household income among non-Hispanic black mothers, and less than full-time paternal employment and blue-collar paternal occupation among non-black Hispanic mothers had inverse associations with excessive GWG.Figure 4

Bottom Line: Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was not statistically significantly associated with excessive GWG in any group.Controlled direct effects were not consistently weaker than total effects.Prevention of excessive GWG may benefit all groups through reducing obesity, but excessive GWG does not appear to serve as a mediator between childhood socioeconomic position and adult obesity in women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Oral Epidemiology and Dental Public Health, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Lower childhood socioeconomic position is associated with greater risk of adult obesity among women, but not men. Pregnancy-related weight changes may contribute to this gender difference. The objectives of this study were to determine the associations between: 1. childhood socioeconomic disadvantage and midlife obesity; 2. excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) and midlife obesity; and 3. childhood socioeconomic disadvantage and excessive GWG, among a representative sample of childbearing women.

Methods: We constructed marginal structural models for seven measures of childhood socioeconomic position for 4780 parous women in the United States, using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979-2010) data. Institute of Medicine definitions were used for excessive GWG; body mass index ≥30 at age 40 defined midlife obesity. Analyses were separated by race/ethnicity. Additionally, we estimated controlled direct effects of childhood socioeconomic disadvantage on midlife obesity under a condition of never gaining excessively in pregnancy.

Results: Low parental education, but not other measures of childhood disadvantage, was associated with greater midlife obesity among non-black non-Hispanic women. Among black and Hispanic mothers, childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was not consistently associated with midlife obesity. Excessive GWG was associated with greater midlife obesity in all racial/ethnic groups. Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was not statistically significantly associated with excessive GWG in any group. Controlled direct effects were not consistently weaker than total effects.

Conclusions: Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with adult obesity, but not with excessive gestational weight gain, and only for certain disadvantage measures among non-black non-Hispanic mothers. Prevention of excessive GWG may benefit all groups through reducing obesity, but excessive GWG does not appear to serve as a mediator between childhood socioeconomic position and adult obesity in women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus