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Socioeconomic disadvantage in childhood as a predictor of excessive gestational weight gain and obesity in midlife adulthood.

Chaffee BW, Abrams B, Cohen AK, Rehkopf DH - Emerg Themes Epidemiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was not statistically significantly associated with excessive GWG in any group.Controlled direct effects were not consistently weaker than total effects.Prevention of excessive GWG may benefit all groups through reducing obesity, but excessive GWG does not appear to serve as a mediator between childhood socioeconomic position and adult obesity in women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Oral Epidemiology and Dental Public Health, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Lower childhood socioeconomic position is associated with greater risk of adult obesity among women, but not men. Pregnancy-related weight changes may contribute to this gender difference. The objectives of this study were to determine the associations between: 1. childhood socioeconomic disadvantage and midlife obesity; 2. excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) and midlife obesity; and 3. childhood socioeconomic disadvantage and excessive GWG, among a representative sample of childbearing women.

Methods: We constructed marginal structural models for seven measures of childhood socioeconomic position for 4780 parous women in the United States, using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979-2010) data. Institute of Medicine definitions were used for excessive GWG; body mass index ≥30 at age 40 defined midlife obesity. Analyses were separated by race/ethnicity. Additionally, we estimated controlled direct effects of childhood socioeconomic disadvantage on midlife obesity under a condition of never gaining excessively in pregnancy.

Results: Low parental education, but not other measures of childhood disadvantage, was associated with greater midlife obesity among non-black non-Hispanic women. Among black and Hispanic mothers, childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was not consistently associated with midlife obesity. Excessive GWG was associated with greater midlife obesity in all racial/ethnic groups. Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was not statistically significantly associated with excessive GWG in any group. Controlled direct effects were not consistently weaker than total effects.

Conclusions: Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with adult obesity, but not with excessive gestational weight gain, and only for certain disadvantage measures among non-black non-Hispanic mothers. Prevention of excessive GWG may benefit all groups through reducing obesity, but excessive GWG does not appear to serve as a mediator between childhood socioeconomic position and adult obesity in women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Eligible women included in the analysis by measure of childhood SEP (exposure) and midlife obesity (outcome). Legend: The figure shows the number of eligible women included in the analysis in separate models for each of seven different measures of childhood socioeconomic position. Exposure to household income below 100% and 200% of the federal poverty level was available for the same sample. Missing gestational weight gain data (GWG) were imputed.
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Fig1: Eligible women included in the analysis by measure of childhood SEP (exposure) and midlife obesity (outcome). Legend: The figure shows the number of eligible women included in the analysis in separate models for each of seven different measures of childhood socioeconomic position. Exposure to household income below 100% and 200% of the federal poverty level was available for the same sample. Missing gestational weight gain data (GWG) were imputed.

Mentions: Using a complex multistage sampling design, the NLSY 1979 cohort recruited men and women, age 14–21 years in 1979, and has followed them since through in-person and telephone interviews [6]. Pregnancy data were collected beginning in 1986: pregnancies prior to 1986 were recorded in that survey year, with subsequent pregnancies recorded prospectively [6]. We excluded women with non-singleton births, and, to maintain temporal ordering, considered only births before age 40, the age at which the main outcome (obesity) was recorded. This yielded 4,780 eligible women, who had 10,908 births (Figure 1).Figure 1


Socioeconomic disadvantage in childhood as a predictor of excessive gestational weight gain and obesity in midlife adulthood.

Chaffee BW, Abrams B, Cohen AK, Rehkopf DH - Emerg Themes Epidemiol (2015)

Eligible women included in the analysis by measure of childhood SEP (exposure) and midlife obesity (outcome). Legend: The figure shows the number of eligible women included in the analysis in separate models for each of seven different measures of childhood socioeconomic position. Exposure to household income below 100% and 200% of the federal poverty level was available for the same sample. Missing gestational weight gain data (GWG) were imputed.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4353468&req=5

Fig1: Eligible women included in the analysis by measure of childhood SEP (exposure) and midlife obesity (outcome). Legend: The figure shows the number of eligible women included in the analysis in separate models for each of seven different measures of childhood socioeconomic position. Exposure to household income below 100% and 200% of the federal poverty level was available for the same sample. Missing gestational weight gain data (GWG) were imputed.
Mentions: Using a complex multistage sampling design, the NLSY 1979 cohort recruited men and women, age 14–21 years in 1979, and has followed them since through in-person and telephone interviews [6]. Pregnancy data were collected beginning in 1986: pregnancies prior to 1986 were recorded in that survey year, with subsequent pregnancies recorded prospectively [6]. We excluded women with non-singleton births, and, to maintain temporal ordering, considered only births before age 40, the age at which the main outcome (obesity) was recorded. This yielded 4,780 eligible women, who had 10,908 births (Figure 1).Figure 1

Bottom Line: Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was not statistically significantly associated with excessive GWG in any group.Controlled direct effects were not consistently weaker than total effects.Prevention of excessive GWG may benefit all groups through reducing obesity, but excessive GWG does not appear to serve as a mediator between childhood socioeconomic position and adult obesity in women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Oral Epidemiology and Dental Public Health, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Lower childhood socioeconomic position is associated with greater risk of adult obesity among women, but not men. Pregnancy-related weight changes may contribute to this gender difference. The objectives of this study were to determine the associations between: 1. childhood socioeconomic disadvantage and midlife obesity; 2. excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) and midlife obesity; and 3. childhood socioeconomic disadvantage and excessive GWG, among a representative sample of childbearing women.

Methods: We constructed marginal structural models for seven measures of childhood socioeconomic position for 4780 parous women in the United States, using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979-2010) data. Institute of Medicine definitions were used for excessive GWG; body mass index ≥30 at age 40 defined midlife obesity. Analyses were separated by race/ethnicity. Additionally, we estimated controlled direct effects of childhood socioeconomic disadvantage on midlife obesity under a condition of never gaining excessively in pregnancy.

Results: Low parental education, but not other measures of childhood disadvantage, was associated with greater midlife obesity among non-black non-Hispanic women. Among black and Hispanic mothers, childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was not consistently associated with midlife obesity. Excessive GWG was associated with greater midlife obesity in all racial/ethnic groups. Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was not statistically significantly associated with excessive GWG in any group. Controlled direct effects were not consistently weaker than total effects.

Conclusions: Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with adult obesity, but not with excessive gestational weight gain, and only for certain disadvantage measures among non-black non-Hispanic mothers. Prevention of excessive GWG may benefit all groups through reducing obesity, but excessive GWG does not appear to serve as a mediator between childhood socioeconomic position and adult obesity in women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus