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An unexpected presentation of haemoperitoneum in a pregnant woman.

Arulpragasam K, Atkinson A, Epee-Bekima M - Case Rep Obstet Gynecol (2015)

Bottom Line: In the majority of tertiary centres the Emergency Room or Assessment Unit is the gateway to the rest of the hospital.On occasion this decision can be straightforward based solely on the patient's presentation, observations, and basic investigations.This case highlights that although the decision and initial management may be apparent, often the diagnosis can be unexpected and that the diagnostic challenge is often outside the scope of a brief Emergency Room assessment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: King Edward Memorial Hospital, Bagot Road, Subiaco, WA 6008, Australia.

ABSTRACT
In the majority of tertiary centres the Emergency Room or Assessment Unit is the gateway to the rest of the hospital. It is the location where critical decisions are formulated depending on whether a patient's condition is serious enough to warrant admission and, at times, emergency surgery. On occasion this decision can be straightforward based solely on the patient's presentation, observations, and basic investigations. This case highlights that although the decision and initial management may be apparent, often the diagnosis can be unexpected and that the diagnostic challenge is often outside the scope of a brief Emergency Room assessment. Corpus luteal cyst rupture is a common phenomenon but often not the cause of significant morbidity as it was in this case, especially in the absence of any associated risk factors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pelvic haemoperitoneum and clots.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4353435&req=5

fig1: Pelvic haemoperitoneum and clots.

Mentions: At laparoscopy one litre of blood was drained from the abdomen but no sign could be found of an ectopic pregnancy (see Figure 1). The uterus was of normal size, the fallopian tubes were unremarkable, and a small active bleeding source was identified on the right ovary but without an obvious cyst seen (see Figure 2). A limited amount of diathermy to this area controlled the bleeding. The upper abdomen inspection was normal. There was no hysteroscopy performed or handling of endometrium at laparoscopy. After removal of blood and organised clots from the abdomen laparoscopically the operation was concluded and the patient returned to the ward.


An unexpected presentation of haemoperitoneum in a pregnant woman.

Arulpragasam K, Atkinson A, Epee-Bekima M - Case Rep Obstet Gynecol (2015)

Pelvic haemoperitoneum and clots.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4353435&req=5

fig1: Pelvic haemoperitoneum and clots.
Mentions: At laparoscopy one litre of blood was drained from the abdomen but no sign could be found of an ectopic pregnancy (see Figure 1). The uterus was of normal size, the fallopian tubes were unremarkable, and a small active bleeding source was identified on the right ovary but without an obvious cyst seen (see Figure 2). A limited amount of diathermy to this area controlled the bleeding. The upper abdomen inspection was normal. There was no hysteroscopy performed or handling of endometrium at laparoscopy. After removal of blood and organised clots from the abdomen laparoscopically the operation was concluded and the patient returned to the ward.

Bottom Line: In the majority of tertiary centres the Emergency Room or Assessment Unit is the gateway to the rest of the hospital.On occasion this decision can be straightforward based solely on the patient's presentation, observations, and basic investigations.This case highlights that although the decision and initial management may be apparent, often the diagnosis can be unexpected and that the diagnostic challenge is often outside the scope of a brief Emergency Room assessment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: King Edward Memorial Hospital, Bagot Road, Subiaco, WA 6008, Australia.

ABSTRACT
In the majority of tertiary centres the Emergency Room or Assessment Unit is the gateway to the rest of the hospital. It is the location where critical decisions are formulated depending on whether a patient's condition is serious enough to warrant admission and, at times, emergency surgery. On occasion this decision can be straightforward based solely on the patient's presentation, observations, and basic investigations. This case highlights that although the decision and initial management may be apparent, often the diagnosis can be unexpected and that the diagnostic challenge is often outside the scope of a brief Emergency Room assessment. Corpus luteal cyst rupture is a common phenomenon but often not the cause of significant morbidity as it was in this case, especially in the absence of any associated risk factors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus