Limits...
Telepractice for pediatric Dysphagia: a case study.

Malandraki GA, Roth M, Sheppard JJ - Int J Telerehabil (2014)

Bottom Line: The present study is a case report.Follow-up interview analysis showed that most skills were retained or improved one-month post intervention.This intensive telepractice program proved to be feasible and effective for this pediatric patient with dysphagia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department Of Biobehavioral Sciences, Program of Speech and Language Pathology, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA ; Dysphagia Research Clinic, Edward D. Mysak Clinic for Communication Disorders, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
A closed-ended intensive pediatric swallowing telepractice program was developed and piloted in one pediatric patient with Opitz BBB/G and Asperger's Syndromes, oropharyngeal dysphagia and aerophagia. The present study is a case report. Outcome variables included behavioral, swallowing and quality of life variables, and were assessed at baseline and at the end of the four-week program. Selective variables were also assessed at a follow-up family interview four weeks post program completion. Over the four-week intervention period, the patient demonstrated substantial improvements in: oral acceptance of eating-related objects and a variety of foods (behavioral variable), timing of voluntary saliva swallows and aerophagia levels (swallowing variables) and quality of life. Follow-up interview analysis showed that most skills were retained or improved one-month post intervention. This intensive telepractice program proved to be feasible and effective for this pediatric patient with dysphagia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Latency of oral acceptance/tolerance of eating-related objects at baseline and post-intervention; results were based on one trial at each time.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352995&req=5

f2-6135-24310-1-pb: Latency of oral acceptance/tolerance of eating-related objects at baseline and post-intervention; results were based on one trial at each time.

Mentions: Results of the latency measure used to determine oral acceptance/tolerance of eating-related objects at baseline and post-intervention show a post-treatment decrease in latency of 3.58 seconds for spoon acceptance (69% decrease) and of 11.09 seconds (62% decrease) for acceptance of a lollipop (Figure 2). Given AB’s initial hesitation to perform these tasks at baseline, these results were based on one trial per item. Table 3 reports the different foods (and consistencies) AB consumed at baseline, post-intervention and at follow-up per mother’s report and clinician’s observations. This information suggests that AB was accepting to consume 5.25 times more foods at the end of the intervention and 11.25 times more foods at follow-up compared to baseline. Furthermore, his advancement into accepting a variety of pureed foods is evident post-intervention and at follow-up.


Telepractice for pediatric Dysphagia: a case study.

Malandraki GA, Roth M, Sheppard JJ - Int J Telerehabil (2014)

Latency of oral acceptance/tolerance of eating-related objects at baseline and post-intervention; results were based on one trial at each time.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352995&req=5

f2-6135-24310-1-pb: Latency of oral acceptance/tolerance of eating-related objects at baseline and post-intervention; results were based on one trial at each time.
Mentions: Results of the latency measure used to determine oral acceptance/tolerance of eating-related objects at baseline and post-intervention show a post-treatment decrease in latency of 3.58 seconds for spoon acceptance (69% decrease) and of 11.09 seconds (62% decrease) for acceptance of a lollipop (Figure 2). Given AB’s initial hesitation to perform these tasks at baseline, these results were based on one trial per item. Table 3 reports the different foods (and consistencies) AB consumed at baseline, post-intervention and at follow-up per mother’s report and clinician’s observations. This information suggests that AB was accepting to consume 5.25 times more foods at the end of the intervention and 11.25 times more foods at follow-up compared to baseline. Furthermore, his advancement into accepting a variety of pureed foods is evident post-intervention and at follow-up.

Bottom Line: The present study is a case report.Follow-up interview analysis showed that most skills were retained or improved one-month post intervention.This intensive telepractice program proved to be feasible and effective for this pediatric patient with dysphagia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department Of Biobehavioral Sciences, Program of Speech and Language Pathology, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA ; Dysphagia Research Clinic, Edward D. Mysak Clinic for Communication Disorders, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
A closed-ended intensive pediatric swallowing telepractice program was developed and piloted in one pediatric patient with Opitz BBB/G and Asperger's Syndromes, oropharyngeal dysphagia and aerophagia. The present study is a case report. Outcome variables included behavioral, swallowing and quality of life variables, and were assessed at baseline and at the end of the four-week program. Selective variables were also assessed at a follow-up family interview four weeks post program completion. Over the four-week intervention period, the patient demonstrated substantial improvements in: oral acceptance of eating-related objects and a variety of foods (behavioral variable), timing of voluntary saliva swallows and aerophagia levels (swallowing variables) and quality of life. Follow-up interview analysis showed that most skills were retained or improved one-month post intervention. This intensive telepractice program proved to be feasible and effective for this pediatric patient with dysphagia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus