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Management of an intruded tooth and adjacent tooth showing external resorption as a late complication of dental injury: three-year follow-up.

Şermet Elbay Ü, Elbay M, Kaya E, Sinanoglu A - Case Rep Dent (2015)

Bottom Line: Some studies have demonstrated that intrusions of up to 3.0 mm have an excellent prognosis, whereas teeth with severe intrusion or teeth that are intruded more than 6.0 mm present an unfavorable prognosis because of the occurrence of inflammatory resorption and pulp necrosis.The aim of this case report is to present an 11-year-old male patient with complete intrusion of the permanent maxillary left lateral incisor, associated with the adjacent central tooth presenting external resorption, treated by immediate surgical repositioning and root canal treatment with a favorable prognosis.After long-term (3-year) clinical and radiographic follow-up, the teeth appeared normal and the patient was pleased with the outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Kocaeli University, 41190 Kocaeli, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Treatment and prognosis of intrusive luxation can vary depending on the age of the patient, type of dentition, stage of root development, and time and severity of the trauma. Some studies have demonstrated that intrusions of up to 3.0 mm have an excellent prognosis, whereas teeth with severe intrusion or teeth that are intruded more than 6.0 mm present an unfavorable prognosis because of the occurrence of inflammatory resorption and pulp necrosis. The aim of this case report is to present an 11-year-old male patient with complete intrusion of the permanent maxillary left lateral incisor, associated with the adjacent central tooth presenting external resorption, treated by immediate surgical repositioning and root canal treatment with a favorable prognosis. After long-term (3-year) clinical and radiographic follow-up, the teeth appeared normal and the patient was pleased with the outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Left upper lateral incisor after replacement and splinting.
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fig3: Left upper lateral incisor after replacement and splinting.

Mentions: Due to the severity of the intrusion and apical development of the root, an immediate surgical repositioning of the lateral incisor was planned. After administering local anesthesia, the intruded tooth was luxated gently with an elevator to minimize cell damage to the periodontal ligament and to the cementum. The intruded tooth was repositioned to its original place. The traumatized lateral incisor was splinted from the central incisor to the ipsilateral first premolar using 0.5 mm stainless-steel multistranded flexible orthodontic wire and an acid etch-composite resin technique (Figure 3). Due to the partial resorption of the root of the primary canine tooth, the first premolar was included in the splint. Endodontic treatment of the lateral incisor tooth was started at the first visit. After accessing, extirpating, and instrumenting, calcium hydroxide that was mixed with sterile saline was placed into the canal. The access cavity was sealed with glass ionomer cement. The patient was asked to maintain good oral hygiene.


Management of an intruded tooth and adjacent tooth showing external resorption as a late complication of dental injury: three-year follow-up.

Şermet Elbay Ü, Elbay M, Kaya E, Sinanoglu A - Case Rep Dent (2015)

Left upper lateral incisor after replacement and splinting.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352940&req=5

fig3: Left upper lateral incisor after replacement and splinting.
Mentions: Due to the severity of the intrusion and apical development of the root, an immediate surgical repositioning of the lateral incisor was planned. After administering local anesthesia, the intruded tooth was luxated gently with an elevator to minimize cell damage to the periodontal ligament and to the cementum. The intruded tooth was repositioned to its original place. The traumatized lateral incisor was splinted from the central incisor to the ipsilateral first premolar using 0.5 mm stainless-steel multistranded flexible orthodontic wire and an acid etch-composite resin technique (Figure 3). Due to the partial resorption of the root of the primary canine tooth, the first premolar was included in the splint. Endodontic treatment of the lateral incisor tooth was started at the first visit. After accessing, extirpating, and instrumenting, calcium hydroxide that was mixed with sterile saline was placed into the canal. The access cavity was sealed with glass ionomer cement. The patient was asked to maintain good oral hygiene.

Bottom Line: Some studies have demonstrated that intrusions of up to 3.0 mm have an excellent prognosis, whereas teeth with severe intrusion or teeth that are intruded more than 6.0 mm present an unfavorable prognosis because of the occurrence of inflammatory resorption and pulp necrosis.The aim of this case report is to present an 11-year-old male patient with complete intrusion of the permanent maxillary left lateral incisor, associated with the adjacent central tooth presenting external resorption, treated by immediate surgical repositioning and root canal treatment with a favorable prognosis.After long-term (3-year) clinical and radiographic follow-up, the teeth appeared normal and the patient was pleased with the outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Kocaeli University, 41190 Kocaeli, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Treatment and prognosis of intrusive luxation can vary depending on the age of the patient, type of dentition, stage of root development, and time and severity of the trauma. Some studies have demonstrated that intrusions of up to 3.0 mm have an excellent prognosis, whereas teeth with severe intrusion or teeth that are intruded more than 6.0 mm present an unfavorable prognosis because of the occurrence of inflammatory resorption and pulp necrosis. The aim of this case report is to present an 11-year-old male patient with complete intrusion of the permanent maxillary left lateral incisor, associated with the adjacent central tooth presenting external resorption, treated by immediate surgical repositioning and root canal treatment with a favorable prognosis. After long-term (3-year) clinical and radiographic follow-up, the teeth appeared normal and the patient was pleased with the outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus