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Superior broadband antireflection from buried Mie resonator arrays for high-efficiency photovoltaics.

Zhong S, Zeng Y, Huang Z, Shen W - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Establishing reliable and efficient antireflection structures is of crucial importance for realizing high-performance optoelectronic devices such as solar cells.We find that the buried Mie resonator arrays mainly play a role as a transparent antireflection structure and their antireflection effect is insensitive to the nanostructure height when higher than 150 nm, which are of prominent significance for photovoltaic applications in the reduction of photoexcited carrier recombination.We further optimally combine the buried Mie resonator arrays with micron-scale textures to maximize the utilization of photons, and thus have successfully achieved an independently certified efficiency of 18.47% for the nanostructured silicon solar cells on a large-size wafer (156 mm × 156 mm).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Solar Energy, and Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Establishing reliable and efficient antireflection structures is of crucial importance for realizing high-performance optoelectronic devices such as solar cells. In this study, we provide a design guideline for buried Mie resonator arrays, which is composed of silicon nanostructures atop a silicon substrate and buried by a dielectric film, to attain a superior antireflection effect over a broadband spectral range by gaining entirely new discoveries of their antireflection behaviors. We find that the buried Mie resonator arrays mainly play a role as a transparent antireflection structure and their antireflection effect is insensitive to the nanostructure height when higher than 150 nm, which are of prominent significance for photovoltaic applications in the reduction of photoexcited carrier recombination. We further optimally combine the buried Mie resonator arrays with micron-scale textures to maximize the utilization of photons, and thus have successfully achieved an independently certified efficiency of 18.47% for the nanostructured silicon solar cells on a large-size wafer (156 mm × 156 mm).

No MeSH data available.


Schematic diagram of (a) the buried Mie resonator arrays and (b) the composition of a single buried Mie resonator together with its interaction with incident light. (c) Forward scattering cross-section for a single SiNP without SiNx layer and with 65 nm and 85 nm SiNx coating. The SiNP has a radius of 75 nm and height of 100 nm. (d) Calculated reflectance of the 1000 nm periodic SiNPs buried by SiNx layers of varying thickness.
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f1: Schematic diagram of (a) the buried Mie resonator arrays and (b) the composition of a single buried Mie resonator together with its interaction with incident light. (c) Forward scattering cross-section for a single SiNP without SiNx layer and with 65 nm and 85 nm SiNx coating. The SiNP has a radius of 75 nm and height of 100 nm. (d) Calculated reflectance of the 1000 nm periodic SiNPs buried by SiNx layers of varying thickness.

Mentions: In this study, we provide a design guideline for an antireflection structure constituted of buried Mie resonator arrays to attain a superior broadband antireflection effect, where the role of Mie resonators is played by silicon nanostructures standing on a silicon substrate and buried under a dielectric film (see Figure 1a,b). Spinelli et al.12, have demonstrated the benefits of the buried Mie resonator arrays on antireflection, focusing on the contribution of the strongly substrate-coupled Mie resonances. Here, we present entirely new discoveries of their antireflection behaviors and give a comprehensive understanding of the antireflection structure. There are mainly two competing mechanisms contributing to the antireflection effects in the buried Mie resonator arrays with a specific period: one is the strong forward scattering from Mie resonances, which dominates at the long wavelength; the other is the scattering modulated interference antireflection that dominates at the short wavelength and with the position of the reflectance minimum deviating from the ideal destructive interference condition. We manipulate both antireflection effects by simply mediating the thickness of the dielectric cover layer on the short silicon nanostructures to simultaneously realize an excellent broadband antireflection and a low carrier recombination for photovoltaic applications. We have further combined the dielectric layers with an optimized multi-scale textures (nanostructures are optimally formed on micron-scale pyramids) to minimize the reflectance (the Rave reaches as low as 2.43% over the wavelength from 400 to 1100 nm) and the recombination, and hence have successfully realized an independently certified conversion efficiency (η) of 18.47% for the nanostructured silicon solar cells on a large-size wafer (156 mm × 156 mm).


Superior broadband antireflection from buried Mie resonator arrays for high-efficiency photovoltaics.

Zhong S, Zeng Y, Huang Z, Shen W - Sci Rep (2015)

Schematic diagram of (a) the buried Mie resonator arrays and (b) the composition of a single buried Mie resonator together with its interaction with incident light. (c) Forward scattering cross-section for a single SiNP without SiNx layer and with 65 nm and 85 nm SiNx coating. The SiNP has a radius of 75 nm and height of 100 nm. (d) Calculated reflectance of the 1000 nm periodic SiNPs buried by SiNx layers of varying thickness.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352919&req=5

f1: Schematic diagram of (a) the buried Mie resonator arrays and (b) the composition of a single buried Mie resonator together with its interaction with incident light. (c) Forward scattering cross-section for a single SiNP without SiNx layer and with 65 nm and 85 nm SiNx coating. The SiNP has a radius of 75 nm and height of 100 nm. (d) Calculated reflectance of the 1000 nm periodic SiNPs buried by SiNx layers of varying thickness.
Mentions: In this study, we provide a design guideline for an antireflection structure constituted of buried Mie resonator arrays to attain a superior broadband antireflection effect, where the role of Mie resonators is played by silicon nanostructures standing on a silicon substrate and buried under a dielectric film (see Figure 1a,b). Spinelli et al.12, have demonstrated the benefits of the buried Mie resonator arrays on antireflection, focusing on the contribution of the strongly substrate-coupled Mie resonances. Here, we present entirely new discoveries of their antireflection behaviors and give a comprehensive understanding of the antireflection structure. There are mainly two competing mechanisms contributing to the antireflection effects in the buried Mie resonator arrays with a specific period: one is the strong forward scattering from Mie resonances, which dominates at the long wavelength; the other is the scattering modulated interference antireflection that dominates at the short wavelength and with the position of the reflectance minimum deviating from the ideal destructive interference condition. We manipulate both antireflection effects by simply mediating the thickness of the dielectric cover layer on the short silicon nanostructures to simultaneously realize an excellent broadband antireflection and a low carrier recombination for photovoltaic applications. We have further combined the dielectric layers with an optimized multi-scale textures (nanostructures are optimally formed on micron-scale pyramids) to minimize the reflectance (the Rave reaches as low as 2.43% over the wavelength from 400 to 1100 nm) and the recombination, and hence have successfully realized an independently certified conversion efficiency (η) of 18.47% for the nanostructured silicon solar cells on a large-size wafer (156 mm × 156 mm).

Bottom Line: Establishing reliable and efficient antireflection structures is of crucial importance for realizing high-performance optoelectronic devices such as solar cells.We find that the buried Mie resonator arrays mainly play a role as a transparent antireflection structure and their antireflection effect is insensitive to the nanostructure height when higher than 150 nm, which are of prominent significance for photovoltaic applications in the reduction of photoexcited carrier recombination.We further optimally combine the buried Mie resonator arrays with micron-scale textures to maximize the utilization of photons, and thus have successfully achieved an independently certified efficiency of 18.47% for the nanostructured silicon solar cells on a large-size wafer (156 mm × 156 mm).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Solar Energy, and Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Establishing reliable and efficient antireflection structures is of crucial importance for realizing high-performance optoelectronic devices such as solar cells. In this study, we provide a design guideline for buried Mie resonator arrays, which is composed of silicon nanostructures atop a silicon substrate and buried by a dielectric film, to attain a superior antireflection effect over a broadband spectral range by gaining entirely new discoveries of their antireflection behaviors. We find that the buried Mie resonator arrays mainly play a role as a transparent antireflection structure and their antireflection effect is insensitive to the nanostructure height when higher than 150 nm, which are of prominent significance for photovoltaic applications in the reduction of photoexcited carrier recombination. We further optimally combine the buried Mie resonator arrays with micron-scale textures to maximize the utilization of photons, and thus have successfully achieved an independently certified efficiency of 18.47% for the nanostructured silicon solar cells on a large-size wafer (156 mm × 156 mm).

No MeSH data available.