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Postmenopausal overactive bladder.

Tomaszewski J - Prz Menopauzalny (2014)

Bottom Line: Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms.Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB.A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 2 Department of Gynecology, Medical University of Lublin, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Bladder storage symptoms have a severe impact on many areas as regards the quality of life including health-related, social, psychological and working functions. Pharmacotherapy of lower urinary tract stores (LUTS) has been developed to optimize neural control of the lower urinary tract in pathologic states. The bladder can be overactive or underactive. Overactive bladder (OAB) is highly prevalent and is associated with considerable morbidity, especially in aging population. Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms. Pharmacotherapy for the OAB must be individualized based on the degree of bother, medication side-effect profile, concomitant comorbidities and current medication regimen. Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB. Alternatively to antimuscarinic therapy, β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, due to their efficacy and favorable adverse event profile, are a novel and attractive option of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of selective antimuscarinic and β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, agents with the different mechanism of action, gives a new treatment option for the patient with OAB according to its harms profile. A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) by type, key symptoms, underlying pathophysiology and relations to disease entity (adapted from [5, 88])
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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Figure 0001: Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) by type, key symptoms, underlying pathophysiology and relations to disease entity (adapted from [5, 88])

Mentions: Lower urinary tract symptoms encompass a range of often comorbid concerns relating to storage symptoms, including urinary incontinence, increased daytime or night-time frequency, urgency, and/or voiding and post-micturition symptoms as hesitancy, slow stream, intermittency, straining to void, spraying/splitting of stream, leakage, painful urination, and feeling of incomplete bladder emptying (urine retention). Overactive bladder, the most bothersome subset of LUTS, has been defined by the International Continence Society (ICS) as urgency, with or without urgency incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia. According to this definition, urgency is an essential component for the diagnosis of OAB, and it is the cornerstone symptom that drives all other symptoms of OAB. Lower urinary tract symptoms have been traditionally associated with the prostate in men and OAB in women [1, 3–5] (Fig. 1).


Postmenopausal overactive bladder.

Tomaszewski J - Prz Menopauzalny (2014)

Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) by type, key symptoms, underlying pathophysiology and relations to disease entity (adapted from [5, 88])
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352916&req=5

Figure 0001: Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) by type, key symptoms, underlying pathophysiology and relations to disease entity (adapted from [5, 88])
Mentions: Lower urinary tract symptoms encompass a range of often comorbid concerns relating to storage symptoms, including urinary incontinence, increased daytime or night-time frequency, urgency, and/or voiding and post-micturition symptoms as hesitancy, slow stream, intermittency, straining to void, spraying/splitting of stream, leakage, painful urination, and feeling of incomplete bladder emptying (urine retention). Overactive bladder, the most bothersome subset of LUTS, has been defined by the International Continence Society (ICS) as urgency, with or without urgency incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia. According to this definition, urgency is an essential component for the diagnosis of OAB, and it is the cornerstone symptom that drives all other symptoms of OAB. Lower urinary tract symptoms have been traditionally associated with the prostate in men and OAB in women [1, 3–5] (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms.Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB.A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 2 Department of Gynecology, Medical University of Lublin, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Bladder storage symptoms have a severe impact on many areas as regards the quality of life including health-related, social, psychological and working functions. Pharmacotherapy of lower urinary tract stores (LUTS) has been developed to optimize neural control of the lower urinary tract in pathologic states. The bladder can be overactive or underactive. Overactive bladder (OAB) is highly prevalent and is associated with considerable morbidity, especially in aging population. Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms. Pharmacotherapy for the OAB must be individualized based on the degree of bother, medication side-effect profile, concomitant comorbidities and current medication regimen. Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB. Alternatively to antimuscarinic therapy, β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, due to their efficacy and favorable adverse event profile, are a novel and attractive option of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of selective antimuscarinic and β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, agents with the different mechanism of action, gives a new treatment option for the patient with OAB according to its harms profile. A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus