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The effects of puberty on white matter development in boys.

Menzies L, Goddings AL, Whitaker KJ, Blakemore SJ, Viner RM - Dev Cogn Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: Most studies have focused on age-related effects, whilst puberty-related changes are not well understood.In addition, testosterone was correlated with MD in these pubertally significant regions.In conclusion, pubertal status was significantly related to MD, but not FA, and this relationship cannot be explained by changes in chronological age alone.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University College London Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, Alexandra House, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK; General Adolescent and Paediatric Unit, University College London Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK. Electronic address: lacmenzies@gmail.com.

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White matter regions demonstrating a significant effect of pubertal status on mean diffusivity (MD). (A) A large single cluster of voxels from the mean skeleton was identified which showed a decrease in MD in the late puberty group compared with the early puberty group. 3D images in axial, sagittal and coronal dimensions, showing areas demonstrating a significant effect of puberty on MD (red), superimposed on 3D reconstruction of the mean white matter tract skeleton (purple). These images are superimposed onto a 2D brain slice in MNI space for orientation purposes at z = −2, z = −8 and y = −35. Images created using Slicer (www.slicer.org) (Fedorov et al., 2012). B) Conventional display of axial slices depicting mean skeleton regions demonstrating a significant effect of puberty (red), shown in MNI space on an MNI standard brain template (MNI z coordinates are indicated for each axial slice).
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fig0005: White matter regions demonstrating a significant effect of pubertal status on mean diffusivity (MD). (A) A large single cluster of voxels from the mean skeleton was identified which showed a decrease in MD in the late puberty group compared with the early puberty group. 3D images in axial, sagittal and coronal dimensions, showing areas demonstrating a significant effect of puberty on MD (red), superimposed on 3D reconstruction of the mean white matter tract skeleton (purple). These images are superimposed onto a 2D brain slice in MNI space for orientation purposes at z = −2, z = −8 and y = −35. Images created using Slicer (www.slicer.org) (Fedorov et al., 2012). B) Conventional display of axial slices depicting mean skeleton regions demonstrating a significant effect of puberty (red), shown in MNI space on an MNI standard brain template (MNI z coordinates are indicated for each axial slice).

Mentions: When considering MD, we found evidence of a main effect of puberty that was significant at a whole brain level (p < 0.05 corrected). Specifically, there was a decrease in MD from early puberty to late puberty in a large single cluster comprising a number of anatomical tracts (see Fig. 1; mean cluster MD for early puberty group: 0.778 × 10−3 mm2/s, late puberty group: 0.753 × 10−3 mm2/s). White matter regions within the significant cluster demonstrating a pubertal effect are summarised in Table 2 and include those in association tracts such as the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculus, cortico-subcortical (limbic) tracts such as the uncinate fasciculus that connects subcortical regions such as the hippocampus and amygdala with orbitofrontal cortex, and projection tracts such as the cortico-spinal tracts.


The effects of puberty on white matter development in boys.

Menzies L, Goddings AL, Whitaker KJ, Blakemore SJ, Viner RM - Dev Cogn Neurosci (2014)

White matter regions demonstrating a significant effect of pubertal status on mean diffusivity (MD). (A) A large single cluster of voxels from the mean skeleton was identified which showed a decrease in MD in the late puberty group compared with the early puberty group. 3D images in axial, sagittal and coronal dimensions, showing areas demonstrating a significant effect of puberty on MD (red), superimposed on 3D reconstruction of the mean white matter tract skeleton (purple). These images are superimposed onto a 2D brain slice in MNI space for orientation purposes at z = −2, z = −8 and y = −35. Images created using Slicer (www.slicer.org) (Fedorov et al., 2012). B) Conventional display of axial slices depicting mean skeleton regions demonstrating a significant effect of puberty (red), shown in MNI space on an MNI standard brain template (MNI z coordinates are indicated for each axial slice).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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fig0005: White matter regions demonstrating a significant effect of pubertal status on mean diffusivity (MD). (A) A large single cluster of voxels from the mean skeleton was identified which showed a decrease in MD in the late puberty group compared with the early puberty group. 3D images in axial, sagittal and coronal dimensions, showing areas demonstrating a significant effect of puberty on MD (red), superimposed on 3D reconstruction of the mean white matter tract skeleton (purple). These images are superimposed onto a 2D brain slice in MNI space for orientation purposes at z = −2, z = −8 and y = −35. Images created using Slicer (www.slicer.org) (Fedorov et al., 2012). B) Conventional display of axial slices depicting mean skeleton regions demonstrating a significant effect of puberty (red), shown in MNI space on an MNI standard brain template (MNI z coordinates are indicated for each axial slice).
Mentions: When considering MD, we found evidence of a main effect of puberty that was significant at a whole brain level (p < 0.05 corrected). Specifically, there was a decrease in MD from early puberty to late puberty in a large single cluster comprising a number of anatomical tracts (see Fig. 1; mean cluster MD for early puberty group: 0.778 × 10−3 mm2/s, late puberty group: 0.753 × 10−3 mm2/s). White matter regions within the significant cluster demonstrating a pubertal effect are summarised in Table 2 and include those in association tracts such as the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculus, cortico-subcortical (limbic) tracts such as the uncinate fasciculus that connects subcortical regions such as the hippocampus and amygdala with orbitofrontal cortex, and projection tracts such as the cortico-spinal tracts.

Bottom Line: Most studies have focused on age-related effects, whilst puberty-related changes are not well understood.In addition, testosterone was correlated with MD in these pubertally significant regions.In conclusion, pubertal status was significantly related to MD, but not FA, and this relationship cannot be explained by changes in chronological age alone.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University College London Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, Alexandra House, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK; General Adolescent and Paediatric Unit, University College London Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK. Electronic address: lacmenzies@gmail.com.

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Related in: MedlinePlus