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Freely designable optical frequency conversion in Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process.

Zheng J, Katsuragawa M - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies.Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely.In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Engineering Science, University of Electro-Communications.

ABSTRACT
Nonlinear optical processes are governed by the relative-phase relationships among the relevant electromagnetic fields in these processes. In this Report, we describe the physics of arbitrary manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process by artificial control of relative phases. As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely. In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm.

No MeSH data available.


Tunability of high-order Raman lasers produced with the artificial phase-manipulation technology, and possible applications of these single-frequency tunable lasers in the vacuum-ultraviolet region of 120 to 200 nm.
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f4: Tunability of high-order Raman lasers produced with the artificial phase-manipulation technology, and possible applications of these single-frequency tunable lasers in the vacuum-ultraviolet region of 120 to 200 nm.

Mentions: Finally, we show some attractive applications of this technology, including precision spectroscopy in the vacuum-ultraviolet region. The third laser field (210.0000 nm) can be practically generated by taking the fourth harmonic of 840.0000 nm which is produced by an injection-seeded Ti:sapphire laser with a frequency precision of a few MHz30. Because the tuning range of this laser can be as wide as ±40 nm30, the 210-nm third laser is tunable over ±10 nm, corresponding to a frequency tuning range of 130 THz—greater than the frequency spacing of the present Raman modes (125 THz). Thereby, we can access any wavelengths from 200 to 120 nm in the vacuum-ultraviolet region. New-wavelength selection requires additional exploration of the optimum thicknesses of the inserted MgF2 plates. However, if the tuning range is within ±20 GHz (sufficient for various spectroscopic applications) we need not adjust the plate thicknesses (see inset in Fig. 4 which shows quantum efficiencies of the high-order Raman generations where the plate thicknesses were fixed). We also note that, besides this arbitrary wavelength selectivity, this laser technology has other attractive abilities, such as high spectral intensity enabling nonlinear spectroscopy, high frequency precision derived from an optical-frequency-standard precision3132, and scalability to ultrahigh energy (e.g. >1 Joule per pulse).


Freely designable optical frequency conversion in Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process.

Zheng J, Katsuragawa M - Sci Rep (2015)

Tunability of high-order Raman lasers produced with the artificial phase-manipulation technology, and possible applications of these single-frequency tunable lasers in the vacuum-ultraviolet region of 120 to 200 nm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352894&req=5

f4: Tunability of high-order Raman lasers produced with the artificial phase-manipulation technology, and possible applications of these single-frequency tunable lasers in the vacuum-ultraviolet region of 120 to 200 nm.
Mentions: Finally, we show some attractive applications of this technology, including precision spectroscopy in the vacuum-ultraviolet region. The third laser field (210.0000 nm) can be practically generated by taking the fourth harmonic of 840.0000 nm which is produced by an injection-seeded Ti:sapphire laser with a frequency precision of a few MHz30. Because the tuning range of this laser can be as wide as ±40 nm30, the 210-nm third laser is tunable over ±10 nm, corresponding to a frequency tuning range of 130 THz—greater than the frequency spacing of the present Raman modes (125 THz). Thereby, we can access any wavelengths from 200 to 120 nm in the vacuum-ultraviolet region. New-wavelength selection requires additional exploration of the optimum thicknesses of the inserted MgF2 plates. However, if the tuning range is within ±20 GHz (sufficient for various spectroscopic applications) we need not adjust the plate thicknesses (see inset in Fig. 4 which shows quantum efficiencies of the high-order Raman generations where the plate thicknesses were fixed). We also note that, besides this arbitrary wavelength selectivity, this laser technology has other attractive abilities, such as high spectral intensity enabling nonlinear spectroscopy, high frequency precision derived from an optical-frequency-standard precision3132, and scalability to ultrahigh energy (e.g. >1 Joule per pulse).

Bottom Line: As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies.Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely.In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Engineering Science, University of Electro-Communications.

ABSTRACT
Nonlinear optical processes are governed by the relative-phase relationships among the relevant electromagnetic fields in these processes. In this Report, we describe the physics of arbitrary manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process by artificial control of relative phases. As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely. In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm.

No MeSH data available.