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Freely designable optical frequency conversion in Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process.

Zheng J, Katsuragawa M - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies.Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely.In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Engineering Science, University of Electro-Communications.

ABSTRACT
Nonlinear optical processes are governed by the relative-phase relationships among the relevant electromagnetic fields in these processes. In this Report, we describe the physics of arbitrary manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process by artificial control of relative phases. As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely. In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm.

No MeSH data available.


Numerical simulation on artificial manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing processes in parahydrogen.(a), Contour plot of photon-number distributions among high-order Raman modes. (b), Typical example of relative-phase manipulation by inserting magnesium fluoride plates. (c), Spatial distribution of vibrational coherence with and without the plates.
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f3: Numerical simulation on artificial manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing processes in parahydrogen.(a), Contour plot of photon-number distributions among high-order Raman modes. (b), Typical example of relative-phase manipulation by inserting magnesium fluoride plates. (c), Spatial distribution of vibrational coherence with and without the plates.

Mentions: Our demonstration is also based on a numerical simulation, the numerical code of which has been verified to be highly reliable12131425. Unlike in the former case (Fig. 2), here we treated all the processes realistically by assuming that the experiment was real. The density of gaseous parahydrogen was set to 2.6 × 1018 cm−3 and the interaction length to 37.2(95) cm. The vibrational coherence, ρ01 (124.7451 THz), was adiabatically driven from the ground state by the two-color laser fields (E0: 801.0817 nm; E-1: 1201.6261 nm; δ = −500 MHz). The peak intensity of the driving lasers was set at 10 GW/cm2 with a 10-ns pulse duration. The peak intensity of the third laser (E0T: 210.0000 nm; 5 ns) was set at 0.1 GW/cm2, 100 times weaker than those of the coherence-driving lasers. The driving and third laser beams were coupled and decoupled in space by setting their polarizations orthogonally (see Fig. 3). As a transparent dispersive material we used magnesium fluoride (MgF2) plates (ordinary axis), because they have high transparency in the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral region. For the refractive index dispersion of MgF2 we relied on that given by the Sellmeier equation29.


Freely designable optical frequency conversion in Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process.

Zheng J, Katsuragawa M - Sci Rep (2015)

Numerical simulation on artificial manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing processes in parahydrogen.(a), Contour plot of photon-number distributions among high-order Raman modes. (b), Typical example of relative-phase manipulation by inserting magnesium fluoride plates. (c), Spatial distribution of vibrational coherence with and without the plates.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352894&req=5

f3: Numerical simulation on artificial manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing processes in parahydrogen.(a), Contour plot of photon-number distributions among high-order Raman modes. (b), Typical example of relative-phase manipulation by inserting magnesium fluoride plates. (c), Spatial distribution of vibrational coherence with and without the plates.
Mentions: Our demonstration is also based on a numerical simulation, the numerical code of which has been verified to be highly reliable12131425. Unlike in the former case (Fig. 2), here we treated all the processes realistically by assuming that the experiment was real. The density of gaseous parahydrogen was set to 2.6 × 1018 cm−3 and the interaction length to 37.2(95) cm. The vibrational coherence, ρ01 (124.7451 THz), was adiabatically driven from the ground state by the two-color laser fields (E0: 801.0817 nm; E-1: 1201.6261 nm; δ = −500 MHz). The peak intensity of the driving lasers was set at 10 GW/cm2 with a 10-ns pulse duration. The peak intensity of the third laser (E0T: 210.0000 nm; 5 ns) was set at 0.1 GW/cm2, 100 times weaker than those of the coherence-driving lasers. The driving and third laser beams were coupled and decoupled in space by setting their polarizations orthogonally (see Fig. 3). As a transparent dispersive material we used magnesium fluoride (MgF2) plates (ordinary axis), because they have high transparency in the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral region. For the refractive index dispersion of MgF2 we relied on that given by the Sellmeier equation29.

Bottom Line: As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies.Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely.In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Engineering Science, University of Electro-Communications.

ABSTRACT
Nonlinear optical processes are governed by the relative-phase relationships among the relevant electromagnetic fields in these processes. In this Report, we describe the physics of arbitrary manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process by artificial control of relative phases. As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely. In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm.

No MeSH data available.