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Freely designable optical frequency conversion in Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process.

Zheng J, Katsuragawa M - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies.Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely.In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Engineering Science, University of Electro-Communications.

ABSTRACT
Nonlinear optical processes are governed by the relative-phase relationships among the relevant electromagnetic fields in these processes. In this Report, we describe the physics of arbitrary manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process by artificial control of relative phases. As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely. In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm.

No MeSH data available.


Scheme of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process in parahydrogen.(a), Adiabatic driving of vibrational coherence at a Raman transition of v = 0 to 1. (b), High-order four-wave-mixing process initiated from the incident third-laser field, E0T.
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f1: Scheme of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process in parahydrogen.(a), Adiabatic driving of vibrational coherence at a Raman transition of v = 0 to 1. (b), High-order four-wave-mixing process initiated from the incident third-laser field, E0T.

Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates the scheme of the Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process. We employ gaseous parahydrogen as a nonlinear optical medium and focus on the pure vibrational Raman transition of v = 0, J = 0 to v = 1, J = 0 at 125.7451 THz1421. First, we adiabatically drive a high coherence between these two vibrational levels, which is achieved by applying two laser-fields, E0 and E-1, and controlling the small two-photon detuning, δ, from the Raman resonance12 (Fig. 1). This adiabatic excitation process of high coherence, ρ01, in turn deeply modulates the two driving laser fields, E0 and E-1 and generates the high-order Stokes and anti-Stokes components, Eq (q: integer). The remarkable feature of this nonlinear optical process is that all the high-order components are generated collinearly without being restricted by the (angle) phase-matching condition, because the high coherence produced allows us to efficiently generate the high-order Raman components, Eq, within a unit phase-slip length12131422. Here, we further introduce another laser field, E0T, collinearly with the two driving laser fields, E0 and E-1. This third laser field is also deeply modulated by the same vibrational motion with high coherence, ρ01 (produced above); moreover, it efficiently generates another series of high-order Stokes and anti-Stokes components, EqT (q: integer), also collinearly without being restricted by the phase-matching condition142324.


Freely designable optical frequency conversion in Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process.

Zheng J, Katsuragawa M - Sci Rep (2015)

Scheme of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process in parahydrogen.(a), Adiabatic driving of vibrational coherence at a Raman transition of v = 0 to 1. (b), High-order four-wave-mixing process initiated from the incident third-laser field, E0T.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352894&req=5

f1: Scheme of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process in parahydrogen.(a), Adiabatic driving of vibrational coherence at a Raman transition of v = 0 to 1. (b), High-order four-wave-mixing process initiated from the incident third-laser field, E0T.
Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates the scheme of the Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process. We employ gaseous parahydrogen as a nonlinear optical medium and focus on the pure vibrational Raman transition of v = 0, J = 0 to v = 1, J = 0 at 125.7451 THz1421. First, we adiabatically drive a high coherence between these two vibrational levels, which is achieved by applying two laser-fields, E0 and E-1, and controlling the small two-photon detuning, δ, from the Raman resonance12 (Fig. 1). This adiabatic excitation process of high coherence, ρ01, in turn deeply modulates the two driving laser fields, E0 and E-1 and generates the high-order Stokes and anti-Stokes components, Eq (q: integer). The remarkable feature of this nonlinear optical process is that all the high-order components are generated collinearly without being restricted by the (angle) phase-matching condition, because the high coherence produced allows us to efficiently generate the high-order Raman components, Eq, within a unit phase-slip length12131422. Here, we further introduce another laser field, E0T, collinearly with the two driving laser fields, E0 and E-1. This third laser field is also deeply modulated by the same vibrational motion with high coherence, ρ01 (produced above); moreover, it efficiently generates another series of high-order Stokes and anti-Stokes components, EqT (q: integer), also collinearly without being restricted by the phase-matching condition142324.

Bottom Line: As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies.Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely.In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Engineering Science, University of Electro-Communications.

ABSTRACT
Nonlinear optical processes are governed by the relative-phase relationships among the relevant electromagnetic fields in these processes. In this Report, we describe the physics of arbitrary manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process by artificial control of relative phases. As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely. In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm.

No MeSH data available.