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Development of bipolar all-solid-state lithium battery based on quasi-solid-state electrolyte containing tetraglyme-LiTFSA equimolar complex.

Gambe Y, Sun Y, Honma I - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Via the successful production of double-layered and triple-layered high-voltage devices, it was confirmed that these stacked batteries operated properly without any internal short-circuits of a single cell within the package: Their plateau potentials (6.7 and 10.0 V, respectively) were two and three times that (3.4 V) of the single-layered device, respectively.Further, the double-layered device showed a capacity retention of 99% on the 200th cycle at 0.5 C, which is an indication of good cycling properties.These results suggest that bipolar stacked batteries with a quasi-solid-state electrolyte containing a Li-Glyme complex could readily produce a high voltage of 10 V.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 KatahiraAoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The development of high energy-density lithium-ion secondary batteries as storage batteries in vehicles is attracting increasing attention. In this study, high-voltage bipolar stacked batteries with a quasi-solid-state electrolyte containing a Li-Glyme complex were prepared, and the performance of the device was evaluated. Via the successful production of double-layered and triple-layered high-voltage devices, it was confirmed that these stacked batteries operated properly without any internal short-circuits of a single cell within the package: Their plateau potentials (6.7 and 10.0 V, respectively) were two and three times that (3.4 V) of the single-layered device, respectively. Further, the double-layered device showed a capacity retention of 99% on the 200th cycle at 0.5 C, which is an indication of good cycling properties. These results suggest that bipolar stacked batteries with a quasi-solid-state electrolyte containing a Li-Glyme complex could readily produce a high voltage of 10 V.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic of (a) conventional stacked Li-ion battery using a liquid electrolyte and (b) bipolar stacked all-solid-state Li battery.
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f1: Schematic of (a) conventional stacked Li-ion battery using a liquid electrolyte and (b) bipolar stacked all-solid-state Li battery.

Mentions: Lithium-ion secondary batteries are expected to be applied as high energy–density devices for large-scale uses such as electric vehicles12. However, commercially available lithium-ion secondary batteries are at risk for liquid leakage and ignition because of the use of organic liquid electrolytes. Therefore, it is necessary to improve their safety. To fulfill this requirement, all-solid-state lithium-ion secondary batteries with non-flammable solid electrolytes are attracting attention. As shown in Figure 1, the use of solid electrolytes enables the stacking of multiple electric cells in series within a single package345; this allows us to reduce the weight of the package and attain a higher energy density as compared to a single-layered cell. However, the availability of materials is limited to solid electrolytes that have high lithium-ion conductivity and are stable towards lithium metals678. Further, there have been reports that suggested that it is difficult to form a good interface between cathode active materials and electrolytes when using solid electrolytes9. Therefore, the development of novel solid electrolyte materials that can resolve these problems is required.


Development of bipolar all-solid-state lithium battery based on quasi-solid-state electrolyte containing tetraglyme-LiTFSA equimolar complex.

Gambe Y, Sun Y, Honma I - Sci Rep (2015)

Schematic of (a) conventional stacked Li-ion battery using a liquid electrolyte and (b) bipolar stacked all-solid-state Li battery.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352844&req=5

f1: Schematic of (a) conventional stacked Li-ion battery using a liquid electrolyte and (b) bipolar stacked all-solid-state Li battery.
Mentions: Lithium-ion secondary batteries are expected to be applied as high energy–density devices for large-scale uses such as electric vehicles12. However, commercially available lithium-ion secondary batteries are at risk for liquid leakage and ignition because of the use of organic liquid electrolytes. Therefore, it is necessary to improve their safety. To fulfill this requirement, all-solid-state lithium-ion secondary batteries with non-flammable solid electrolytes are attracting attention. As shown in Figure 1, the use of solid electrolytes enables the stacking of multiple electric cells in series within a single package345; this allows us to reduce the weight of the package and attain a higher energy density as compared to a single-layered cell. However, the availability of materials is limited to solid electrolytes that have high lithium-ion conductivity and are stable towards lithium metals678. Further, there have been reports that suggested that it is difficult to form a good interface between cathode active materials and electrolytes when using solid electrolytes9. Therefore, the development of novel solid electrolyte materials that can resolve these problems is required.

Bottom Line: Via the successful production of double-layered and triple-layered high-voltage devices, it was confirmed that these stacked batteries operated properly without any internal short-circuits of a single cell within the package: Their plateau potentials (6.7 and 10.0 V, respectively) were two and three times that (3.4 V) of the single-layered device, respectively.Further, the double-layered device showed a capacity retention of 99% on the 200th cycle at 0.5 C, which is an indication of good cycling properties.These results suggest that bipolar stacked batteries with a quasi-solid-state electrolyte containing a Li-Glyme complex could readily produce a high voltage of 10 V.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 KatahiraAoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The development of high energy-density lithium-ion secondary batteries as storage batteries in vehicles is attracting increasing attention. In this study, high-voltage bipolar stacked batteries with a quasi-solid-state electrolyte containing a Li-Glyme complex were prepared, and the performance of the device was evaluated. Via the successful production of double-layered and triple-layered high-voltage devices, it was confirmed that these stacked batteries operated properly without any internal short-circuits of a single cell within the package: Their plateau potentials (6.7 and 10.0 V, respectively) were two and three times that (3.4 V) of the single-layered device, respectively. Further, the double-layered device showed a capacity retention of 99% on the 200th cycle at 0.5 C, which is an indication of good cycling properties. These results suggest that bipolar stacked batteries with a quasi-solid-state electrolyte containing a Li-Glyme complex could readily produce a high voltage of 10 V.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus