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Bioavailability of dietary polyphenols and gut microbiota metabolism: antimicrobial properties.

Marín L, Miguélez EM, Villar CJ, Lombó F - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Most of them occur as glycosylated derivatives in plants and foods.During this transit along diverse tissues and organs, they are able to carry out strong antiviral, antibacterial, and antiparasitic activities.This paper revises and discusses these antimicrobial activities of dietary polyphenols and their relevance for human health, shedding light on the importance of polyphenols structure recognition by specific enzymes produced by intestinal microbial taxa.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Unit "Biotechnology and Experimental Therapy Based in Nutraceuticals-BITTEN", Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias (IUOPA), Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Polyphenolic compounds are plant nutraceuticals showing a huge structural diversity, including chlorogenic acids, hydrolyzable tannins, and flavonoids (flavonols, flavanones, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanidins, isoflavones, and flavones). Most of them occur as glycosylated derivatives in plants and foods. In order to become bioactive at human body, these polyphenols must undergo diverse intestinal transformations, due to the action of digestive enzymes, but also by the action of microbiota metabolism. After elimination of sugar tailoring (generating the corresponding aglycons) and diverse hydroxyl moieties, as well as further backbone reorganizations, the final absorbed compounds enter the portal vein circulation towards liver (where other enzymatic transformations take place) and from there to other organs, including behind the digestive tract or via blood towards urine excretion. During this transit along diverse tissues and organs, they are able to carry out strong antiviral, antibacterial, and antiparasitic activities. This paper revises and discusses these antimicrobial activities of dietary polyphenols and their relevance for human health, shedding light on the importance of polyphenols structure recognition by specific enzymes produced by intestinal microbial taxa.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Colonic formation of (S)-equol and O-demethylangolensin from the isoflavone daidzein.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig8: Colonic formation of (S)-equol and O-demethylangolensin from the isoflavone daidzein.

Mentions: One of the most active isoflavones, daidzein, is metabolized in two different ways depending on subjects and their gut microbiota. Some subjects produce (S)-equol via dihydrodaidzein and tetrahydrodaidzein (resulting from the activities of Streptococcus intermedius, B. ovatus, Ruminococcus productus, Lactobacillus mucosae EPI2, E. faecium EPI1, Veillonella spp., Eggerthella sp. Julong732, and Finegoldia magna EPI3) [31–33] (Figure 8). However others produce O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA) via 2′-dehydro-O-demethylangolensin (generated by Clostridium spp.) [34] (Figure 8) (Table 1). Therefore, there are two groups of subjects, (S)-equol producers and nonproducers. The inability to produce (S)-equol is a consequence of the lack of specific components in the intestinal microbiota, as the species described before. (S)-equol shows high antioxidant activity due to its nonplanar structure, which enables it to penetrate more easily into the interior of the cell membrane, preventing oxidative damage in situ. Also its estrogenic activity on mammal cells is higher in comparison with other phytoestrogens. This compound binds to estrogen receptor in mammal cells, downregulating its activity. This may have potential application in breast and prostate cancer therapy and prevention [135–137]. In addition to (S)-equol and O-DMA, other less active microbial metabolites of daidzein have been reported [138].


Bioavailability of dietary polyphenols and gut microbiota metabolism: antimicrobial properties.

Marín L, Miguélez EM, Villar CJ, Lombó F - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Colonic formation of (S)-equol and O-demethylangolensin from the isoflavone daidzein.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352739&req=5

fig8: Colonic formation of (S)-equol and O-demethylangolensin from the isoflavone daidzein.
Mentions: One of the most active isoflavones, daidzein, is metabolized in two different ways depending on subjects and their gut microbiota. Some subjects produce (S)-equol via dihydrodaidzein and tetrahydrodaidzein (resulting from the activities of Streptococcus intermedius, B. ovatus, Ruminococcus productus, Lactobacillus mucosae EPI2, E. faecium EPI1, Veillonella spp., Eggerthella sp. Julong732, and Finegoldia magna EPI3) [31–33] (Figure 8). However others produce O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA) via 2′-dehydro-O-demethylangolensin (generated by Clostridium spp.) [34] (Figure 8) (Table 1). Therefore, there are two groups of subjects, (S)-equol producers and nonproducers. The inability to produce (S)-equol is a consequence of the lack of specific components in the intestinal microbiota, as the species described before. (S)-equol shows high antioxidant activity due to its nonplanar structure, which enables it to penetrate more easily into the interior of the cell membrane, preventing oxidative damage in situ. Also its estrogenic activity on mammal cells is higher in comparison with other phytoestrogens. This compound binds to estrogen receptor in mammal cells, downregulating its activity. This may have potential application in breast and prostate cancer therapy and prevention [135–137]. In addition to (S)-equol and O-DMA, other less active microbial metabolites of daidzein have been reported [138].

Bottom Line: Most of them occur as glycosylated derivatives in plants and foods.During this transit along diverse tissues and organs, they are able to carry out strong antiviral, antibacterial, and antiparasitic activities.This paper revises and discusses these antimicrobial activities of dietary polyphenols and their relevance for human health, shedding light on the importance of polyphenols structure recognition by specific enzymes produced by intestinal microbial taxa.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Unit "Biotechnology and Experimental Therapy Based in Nutraceuticals-BITTEN", Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias (IUOPA), Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Polyphenolic compounds are plant nutraceuticals showing a huge structural diversity, including chlorogenic acids, hydrolyzable tannins, and flavonoids (flavonols, flavanones, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanidins, isoflavones, and flavones). Most of them occur as glycosylated derivatives in plants and foods. In order to become bioactive at human body, these polyphenols must undergo diverse intestinal transformations, due to the action of digestive enzymes, but also by the action of microbiota metabolism. After elimination of sugar tailoring (generating the corresponding aglycons) and diverse hydroxyl moieties, as well as further backbone reorganizations, the final absorbed compounds enter the portal vein circulation towards liver (where other enzymatic transformations take place) and from there to other organs, including behind the digestive tract or via blood towards urine excretion. During this transit along diverse tissues and organs, they are able to carry out strong antiviral, antibacterial, and antiparasitic activities. This paper revises and discusses these antimicrobial activities of dietary polyphenols and their relevance for human health, shedding light on the importance of polyphenols structure recognition by specific enzymes produced by intestinal microbial taxa.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus