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A rare cause of acute Dysphagia: abscess of the base of the tongue.

Ozgur GT, Akdogan MV, Unler GK, Gokturk HS - Case Rep Gastrointest Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Dysphagia represents a difficulty in passage of solid or liquid foods from the oral cavity into the stomach and is considered as an alarm symptom of gastrointestinal system.It often indicates an organic disease and needs to be explained.In this paper, a case of 61-year-old man with posterior tongue abscess is presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Konya, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Dysphagia represents a difficulty in passage of solid or liquid foods from the oral cavity into the stomach and is considered as an alarm symptom of gastrointestinal system. It often indicates an organic disease and needs to be explained. In this paper, a case of 61-year-old man with posterior tongue abscess is presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Mentions: A 61-year-old man was admitted to the department of the gastroenterology with complaints of odynophagia and dysphagia to solid foods for one month. He experienced worsening of dysphagia and he also reported otalgia for the last two days. His oral intake had decreased and he had preferred to consume liquids. As a result, he had lost 10 kg in a month. Fifteen days before the admission, the patient was assessed by several ENT outpatient clinics and was treated for pharyngitis with two different antibiotics. He had no history of smoking, alcohol consumption, or any other systemic diseases. During the questioning of the patient, he pointed out his neck region as the site of obstruction. On physical examination, he was afebrile with normal vital signs. However, the palpation of the neck was painful. The white blood cell count was 6,940/mm³, C-reactive protein was 51 mg/L, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 64 mm/hour. The standard barium swallow study was normal. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed normal findings except for erosive bulbitis. The etiology of dysphagia had not been identified by these tests and a computed tomography (CT) scan of the neck was performed. The CT scan demonstrated a 4 × 2.5 cm sized cystic lesion with minimal irregular border at the base of the tongue (Figure 1). The patient was referred to the ENT department. On his ENT examination, there was a slight swelling at the base of the tongue. The larynx and the tonsils were normal. There were no signs of airway obstruction. The abscess at the base of the tongue was drained through the oral route by needle aspiration for five consecutive days. On the first day, a 15 cc purulent material was drained and the aspirated material was cultured. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated from the culture media and the empirical treatment with ceftriaxone based on the antibiogram results was not changed. The patient was ordered to complete a 7- to 10-day course of oral antibiotic therapy. The follow-up CT scan of neck performed one month later revealed complete disappearance of the abscess (Figure 2).


A rare cause of acute Dysphagia: abscess of the base of the tongue.

Ozgur GT, Akdogan MV, Unler GK, Gokturk HS - Case Rep Gastrointest Med (2015)

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352731&req=5

Mentions: A 61-year-old man was admitted to the department of the gastroenterology with complaints of odynophagia and dysphagia to solid foods for one month. He experienced worsening of dysphagia and he also reported otalgia for the last two days. His oral intake had decreased and he had preferred to consume liquids. As a result, he had lost 10 kg in a month. Fifteen days before the admission, the patient was assessed by several ENT outpatient clinics and was treated for pharyngitis with two different antibiotics. He had no history of smoking, alcohol consumption, or any other systemic diseases. During the questioning of the patient, he pointed out his neck region as the site of obstruction. On physical examination, he was afebrile with normal vital signs. However, the palpation of the neck was painful. The white blood cell count was 6,940/mm³, C-reactive protein was 51 mg/L, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 64 mm/hour. The standard barium swallow study was normal. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed normal findings except for erosive bulbitis. The etiology of dysphagia had not been identified by these tests and a computed tomography (CT) scan of the neck was performed. The CT scan demonstrated a 4 × 2.5 cm sized cystic lesion with minimal irregular border at the base of the tongue (Figure 1). The patient was referred to the ENT department. On his ENT examination, there was a slight swelling at the base of the tongue. The larynx and the tonsils were normal. There were no signs of airway obstruction. The abscess at the base of the tongue was drained through the oral route by needle aspiration for five consecutive days. On the first day, a 15 cc purulent material was drained and the aspirated material was cultured. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated from the culture media and the empirical treatment with ceftriaxone based on the antibiogram results was not changed. The patient was ordered to complete a 7- to 10-day course of oral antibiotic therapy. The follow-up CT scan of neck performed one month later revealed complete disappearance of the abscess (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Dysphagia represents a difficulty in passage of solid or liquid foods from the oral cavity into the stomach and is considered as an alarm symptom of gastrointestinal system.It often indicates an organic disease and needs to be explained.In this paper, a case of 61-year-old man with posterior tongue abscess is presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Konya, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Dysphagia represents a difficulty in passage of solid or liquid foods from the oral cavity into the stomach and is considered as an alarm symptom of gastrointestinal system. It often indicates an organic disease and needs to be explained. In this paper, a case of 61-year-old man with posterior tongue abscess is presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus