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Use of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in keratoconjunctivitis sicca in a canine model.

Villatoro AJ, Fernández V, Claros S, Rico-Llanos GA, Becerra J, Andrades JA - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Average STT values and all clinical signs showed a statistically significant change (P < 0.001) during the follow-up with reduction in all ocular parameters scored: ocular discharge, conjunctival hyperaemia, and corneal changes, and there were no signs of regression or worsening.Implanted cells were well tolerated and were effective reducing clinical signs of KCS with a sustained effect during the study period.These results could reinforce a good effective solution to be extrapolated to future studies in human.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Bioengineering and Tissue Regeneration (LABRET), Department of Cell Biology, Genetics and Physiology, Faculty of Sciences, Biomedical Research Institute of Málaga (IBIMA), University of Málaga, 29071 Málaga, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) or dry eye disease (DED) is an immune-mediated multifactorial disease, with high level of prevalence in humans and dogs. Our aim in this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of allogeneic adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (Ad-MSCs) implanted around the lacrimal glands in 12 dogs (24 eyes) with KCS, which is refractory to current available treatments. Schirmer tear test (STT) and ocular surface integrity were assessed at 0 (before treatment), 3, 6, and 9 months after treatment. Average STT values and all clinical signs showed a statistically significant change (P < 0.001) during the follow-up with reduction in all ocular parameters scored: ocular discharge, conjunctival hyperaemia, and corneal changes, and there were no signs of regression or worsening. Implanted cells were well tolerated and were effective reducing clinical signs of KCS with a sustained effect during the study period. None of the animals showed systemic or local complications during the study. To our knowledge, this is the first time in literature that implantation of allogeneic Ad-MSCs around lacrimal glands has been found as an effective therapeutic alternative to treat dogs with KCS. These results could reinforce a good effective solution to be extrapolated to future studies in human.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photographs of the right eye of dog number 7 with chronic KCS and STT 0 mm/min during 2 years, severe ocular discharge, severe hyperaemia, and moderate cornea changes (edema, cornea opacity, and vascularization). (a) Eye at baseline (0). (b) Same eye at 9 months after cell implantation. STT 19 mm/min, without secretion, mild hyperaemia, and improvement on cornea changes and showing a good lacrimal meniscus.
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fig4: Photographs of the right eye of dog number 7 with chronic KCS and STT 0 mm/min during 2 years, severe ocular discharge, severe hyperaemia, and moderate cornea changes (edema, cornea opacity, and vascularization). (a) Eye at baseline (0). (b) Same eye at 9 months after cell implantation. STT 19 mm/min, without secretion, mild hyperaemia, and improvement on cornea changes and showing a good lacrimal meniscus.

Mentions: The clinical observation of the process showed a significant improvement during the first three months after transplantation. This recovery remains stable until the last follow-up and did not show signs of regression or worsening (Figure 4).


Use of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in keratoconjunctivitis sicca in a canine model.

Villatoro AJ, Fernández V, Claros S, Rico-Llanos GA, Becerra J, Andrades JA - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Photographs of the right eye of dog number 7 with chronic KCS and STT 0 mm/min during 2 years, severe ocular discharge, severe hyperaemia, and moderate cornea changes (edema, cornea opacity, and vascularization). (a) Eye at baseline (0). (b) Same eye at 9 months after cell implantation. STT 19 mm/min, without secretion, mild hyperaemia, and improvement on cornea changes and showing a good lacrimal meniscus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352730&req=5

fig4: Photographs of the right eye of dog number 7 with chronic KCS and STT 0 mm/min during 2 years, severe ocular discharge, severe hyperaemia, and moderate cornea changes (edema, cornea opacity, and vascularization). (a) Eye at baseline (0). (b) Same eye at 9 months after cell implantation. STT 19 mm/min, without secretion, mild hyperaemia, and improvement on cornea changes and showing a good lacrimal meniscus.
Mentions: The clinical observation of the process showed a significant improvement during the first three months after transplantation. This recovery remains stable until the last follow-up and did not show signs of regression or worsening (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: Average STT values and all clinical signs showed a statistically significant change (P < 0.001) during the follow-up with reduction in all ocular parameters scored: ocular discharge, conjunctival hyperaemia, and corneal changes, and there were no signs of regression or worsening.Implanted cells were well tolerated and were effective reducing clinical signs of KCS with a sustained effect during the study period.These results could reinforce a good effective solution to be extrapolated to future studies in human.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Bioengineering and Tissue Regeneration (LABRET), Department of Cell Biology, Genetics and Physiology, Faculty of Sciences, Biomedical Research Institute of Málaga (IBIMA), University of Málaga, 29071 Málaga, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) or dry eye disease (DED) is an immune-mediated multifactorial disease, with high level of prevalence in humans and dogs. Our aim in this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of allogeneic adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (Ad-MSCs) implanted around the lacrimal glands in 12 dogs (24 eyes) with KCS, which is refractory to current available treatments. Schirmer tear test (STT) and ocular surface integrity were assessed at 0 (before treatment), 3, 6, and 9 months after treatment. Average STT values and all clinical signs showed a statistically significant change (P < 0.001) during the follow-up with reduction in all ocular parameters scored: ocular discharge, conjunctival hyperaemia, and corneal changes, and there were no signs of regression or worsening. Implanted cells were well tolerated and were effective reducing clinical signs of KCS with a sustained effect during the study period. None of the animals showed systemic or local complications during the study. To our knowledge, this is the first time in literature that implantation of allogeneic Ad-MSCs around lacrimal glands has been found as an effective therapeutic alternative to treat dogs with KCS. These results could reinforce a good effective solution to be extrapolated to future studies in human.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus