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Bioaccessible antioxidants in milk fermented by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum strains.

Gagnon M, Savard P, Rivière A, LaPointe G, Roy D - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: New targets such as antioxidant properties have interest for beneficial effects on health.However, there does not appear to be a relationship between gene sequence types and antioxidant capacity.The milk fermented by each of the five strains selected (CUETM 268, 172, 245, 247, or PRO 16-10) did not have higher initial ORAC values compared to the nonfermented milk samples.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut sur la Nutrition et les Aliments Fonctionnels (INAF), Université Laval, 2440 Boulevard Hochelaga, Québec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6.

ABSTRACT
Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum is among the dominant species of the human gastrointestinal microbiota and could thus have potential as probiotics. New targets such as antioxidant properties have interest for beneficial effects on health. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioaccessibility of antioxidants in milk fermented by selected B. longum subsp. longum strains during in vitro dynamic digestion. The antioxidant capacity of cell extracts from 38 strains, of which 32 belong to B. longum subsp. longum, was evaluated with the ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) method. On the basis of screening and gene sequence typing by multilocus locus sequence analysis (MLSA), five strains were chosen for fermenting reconstituted skim milk. Antioxidant capacity varied among the strains tested (P = 0.0009). Two strains of B. longum subsp. longum (CUETM 172 and 171) showed significantly higher ORAC values than the other bifidobacteria strains. However, there does not appear to be a relationship between gene sequence types and antioxidant capacity. The milk fermented by each of the five strains selected (CUETM 268, 172, 245, 247, or PRO 16-10) did not have higher initial ORAC values compared to the nonfermented milk samples. However, higher bioaccessibility of antioxidants in fermented milk (175-358%) was observed during digestion.

Show MeSH
Survival rate of the five strains used for milk fermentation during in vitro digestion (TIM-1). The viable cells were determined by PMA-qPCR and by viable counts (VC) in the effluent after each hour of digestion. The remaining cells in the jejunum and ileum residue after 300 min of digestion were included in the survival rate. The results are presented relative to the total cells in the fermented milk at the start (% of intake). The error bars represent the standard deviation.
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fig3: Survival rate of the five strains used for milk fermentation during in vitro digestion (TIM-1). The viable cells were determined by PMA-qPCR and by viable counts (VC) in the effluent after each hour of digestion. The remaining cells in the jejunum and ileum residue after 300 min of digestion were included in the survival rate. The results are presented relative to the total cells in the fermented milk at the start (% of intake). The error bars represent the standard deviation.

Mentions: In the effluent, total number of cells evaluated with PMA-qPCR was at least 109 viable cells for all strains (CUETM 172: 2.64 × 1010 cells, CUETM 268: 4.09 × 1010 cells, CUETM 245: 4.25 × 109 cells, CUETM 247: 1.26 × 1010 cells, and PRO 16-10: 4.99 × 109 cells). Survival rates of cells in the TIM-1 effluent estimated by PMA-qPCR were higher than those determined with viable counts (Figure 3). B. longum subsp. longum CUETM 172, 268, and 247 exhibited survival rates higher than 3% according to the PMA-qPCR results. In contrast, the survival rate of B. longum subsp. longum PRO 16-10 was lower than 1%.


Bioaccessible antioxidants in milk fermented by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum strains.

Gagnon M, Savard P, Rivière A, LaPointe G, Roy D - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Survival rate of the five strains used for milk fermentation during in vitro digestion (TIM-1). The viable cells were determined by PMA-qPCR and by viable counts (VC) in the effluent after each hour of digestion. The remaining cells in the jejunum and ileum residue after 300 min of digestion were included in the survival rate. The results are presented relative to the total cells in the fermented milk at the start (% of intake). The error bars represent the standard deviation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352726&req=5

fig3: Survival rate of the five strains used for milk fermentation during in vitro digestion (TIM-1). The viable cells were determined by PMA-qPCR and by viable counts (VC) in the effluent after each hour of digestion. The remaining cells in the jejunum and ileum residue after 300 min of digestion were included in the survival rate. The results are presented relative to the total cells in the fermented milk at the start (% of intake). The error bars represent the standard deviation.
Mentions: In the effluent, total number of cells evaluated with PMA-qPCR was at least 109 viable cells for all strains (CUETM 172: 2.64 × 1010 cells, CUETM 268: 4.09 × 1010 cells, CUETM 245: 4.25 × 109 cells, CUETM 247: 1.26 × 1010 cells, and PRO 16-10: 4.99 × 109 cells). Survival rates of cells in the TIM-1 effluent estimated by PMA-qPCR were higher than those determined with viable counts (Figure 3). B. longum subsp. longum CUETM 172, 268, and 247 exhibited survival rates higher than 3% according to the PMA-qPCR results. In contrast, the survival rate of B. longum subsp. longum PRO 16-10 was lower than 1%.

Bottom Line: New targets such as antioxidant properties have interest for beneficial effects on health.However, there does not appear to be a relationship between gene sequence types and antioxidant capacity.The milk fermented by each of the five strains selected (CUETM 268, 172, 245, 247, or PRO 16-10) did not have higher initial ORAC values compared to the nonfermented milk samples.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut sur la Nutrition et les Aliments Fonctionnels (INAF), Université Laval, 2440 Boulevard Hochelaga, Québec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6.

ABSTRACT
Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum is among the dominant species of the human gastrointestinal microbiota and could thus have potential as probiotics. New targets such as antioxidant properties have interest for beneficial effects on health. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioaccessibility of antioxidants in milk fermented by selected B. longum subsp. longum strains during in vitro dynamic digestion. The antioxidant capacity of cell extracts from 38 strains, of which 32 belong to B. longum subsp. longum, was evaluated with the ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) method. On the basis of screening and gene sequence typing by multilocus locus sequence analysis (MLSA), five strains were chosen for fermenting reconstituted skim milk. Antioxidant capacity varied among the strains tested (P = 0.0009). Two strains of B. longum subsp. longum (CUETM 172 and 171) showed significantly higher ORAC values than the other bifidobacteria strains. However, there does not appear to be a relationship between gene sequence types and antioxidant capacity. The milk fermented by each of the five strains selected (CUETM 268, 172, 245, 247, or PRO 16-10) did not have higher initial ORAC values compared to the nonfermented milk samples. However, higher bioaccessibility of antioxidants in fermented milk (175-358%) was observed during digestion.

Show MeSH