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Cervical intramedullary schwannoma mimicking a glioma.

Gupta A, Nair BR, Chacko G, Mani S, Joseph V - Asian J Neurosurg (2015 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: Preoperative diagnosis of a cervical IS is not always possible.Complete tumor resection is the ideal treatment for IS.Intraoperative frozen section can be a useful for decision making though the tumor-cord plane will ultimately decide if the tumor can be radically excised.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurological Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.

ABSTRACT
We present a case of a cervical intramedullary schwannoma (IS), which resembled a glioma on radiology. Somatic and root pain, the most common presenting complaints of IS, were lacking in our patient, and the characteristic magnetic resonance finding of an enhancing thickened nerve root in IS, was absent in our case. Preoperative diagnosis of a cervical IS is not always possible. Complete tumor resection is the ideal treatment for IS. Intraoperative frozen section can be a useful for decision making though the tumor-cord plane will ultimately decide if the tumor can be radically excised.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Histopathological examination showing a spindle cell tumor with Verocay bodies, consistent with schwannoma
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Figure 3: Histopathological examination showing a spindle cell tumor with Verocay bodies, consistent with schwannoma

Mentions: Histopathological examination revealed a cellular tumor composed of compact interlacing fascicles of spindle-shaped cells with oval to elongated, mildly pleomorphic nuclei with inconspicuous nucleoli and moderate amounts of eosinophilic cytoplasm with indistinct cell borders. Mitotic activity was inconspicuous. Several Verocay bodies were present. The tumor cells stained positive for S100 and were immunonegative for glial fibrillary acidic protein and epithelial membrane antigen (1:10). The histopathological features were consistent with that of a schwannoma [Figure 3].


Cervical intramedullary schwannoma mimicking a glioma.

Gupta A, Nair BR, Chacko G, Mani S, Joseph V - Asian J Neurosurg (2015 Jan-Mar)

Histopathological examination showing a spindle cell tumor with Verocay bodies, consistent with schwannoma
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352628&req=5

Figure 3: Histopathological examination showing a spindle cell tumor with Verocay bodies, consistent with schwannoma
Mentions: Histopathological examination revealed a cellular tumor composed of compact interlacing fascicles of spindle-shaped cells with oval to elongated, mildly pleomorphic nuclei with inconspicuous nucleoli and moderate amounts of eosinophilic cytoplasm with indistinct cell borders. Mitotic activity was inconspicuous. Several Verocay bodies were present. The tumor cells stained positive for S100 and were immunonegative for glial fibrillary acidic protein and epithelial membrane antigen (1:10). The histopathological features were consistent with that of a schwannoma [Figure 3].

Bottom Line: Preoperative diagnosis of a cervical IS is not always possible.Complete tumor resection is the ideal treatment for IS.Intraoperative frozen section can be a useful for decision making though the tumor-cord plane will ultimately decide if the tumor can be radically excised.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurological Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.

ABSTRACT
We present a case of a cervical intramedullary schwannoma (IS), which resembled a glioma on radiology. Somatic and root pain, the most common presenting complaints of IS, were lacking in our patient, and the characteristic magnetic resonance finding of an enhancing thickened nerve root in IS, was absent in our case. Preoperative diagnosis of a cervical IS is not always possible. Complete tumor resection is the ideal treatment for IS. Intraoperative frozen section can be a useful for decision making though the tumor-cord plane will ultimately decide if the tumor can be radically excised.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus