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Brain metastasis from pancreatic cancer: A case report and literature review.

Matsumoto H, Yoshida Y - Asian J Neurosurg (2015 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: Magnetic resonance imaging and abdominal computed tomography revealed advanced pancreatic cancer (PC) with brain and para-aortic lymph node metastases.Although symptoms improved, the patient died 3 months postoperatively.In general, the prognosis for PC patients with brain metastasis is very poor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Eisyokai Yoshida Hospital, Kobe, Japan.

ABSTRACT
A 68-year-old man presented to our hospital with a 1-month history of slowly progressing altered mental status and gait disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging and abdominal computed tomography revealed advanced pancreatic cancer (PC) with brain and para-aortic lymph node metastases. Gross total resection of the brain metastatic tumor was performed. Although symptoms improved, the patient died 3 months postoperatively. In general, the prognosis for PC patients with brain metastasis is very poor. Surgical resection of brain metastasis may play a very limited role in allowing long-term survival of patients for whom the primary PC is controlled or with particular oncocytic-type tumors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed multiple hypodense lesions at the head of the pancreas (a), and para-aortic lymph nodes enlargement (b), as indicated the arrows
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Figure 2: Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed multiple hypodense lesions at the head of the pancreas (a), and para-aortic lymph nodes enlargement (b), as indicated the arrows

Mentions: A 68-year-old man presented to our hospital with a 1-month history of slowly progressing altered mental status and gait disturbance. On neurological examination, the patient displayed disorientation with mild left hemiparesis and facial palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass lesion comprising solid parts and multiple cysts in the right temporoparietal region. The mass demonstrated irregular ring-enhancement on contrast administration and was accompanied by extensive perifocal edema [Figure 1a–c]. We suspected metastatic brain tumor and performed whole-body computed tomography (CT). Although no obvious lung cancer was identified, abdominal contrast-enhanced CT revealed multiple hypodense lesions at the head of the pancreas with enlargement of the para-aortic lymph nodes [Figure 2a and b]. Laboratory testing showed: Glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, 30 U/L; glutamic pyruvic transaminase, 66 U/L; alkaline phosphatase, 606 U/L; lactate dehydrogenase, 347 U/L; and g-glutamyl transpeptidase, 362 U/L. These findings were consistent with biliary obstruction and liver damage. The carbohydrate antigen 19–9) level was 87 U/mL (normal, <37 U/mL) and the carcinoembryonic antigen level was 193 ng/mL (normal, <5 ng/mL). Advanced PC was diagnosed (International Union against Cancer tumor-node-metastasis classification, T3N3M1 stage 4) and very poor prognosis was predicted due to the presence of brain metastasis.


Brain metastasis from pancreatic cancer: A case report and literature review.

Matsumoto H, Yoshida Y - Asian J Neurosurg (2015 Jan-Mar)

Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed multiple hypodense lesions at the head of the pancreas (a), and para-aortic lymph nodes enlargement (b), as indicated the arrows
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352626&req=5

Figure 2: Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed multiple hypodense lesions at the head of the pancreas (a), and para-aortic lymph nodes enlargement (b), as indicated the arrows
Mentions: A 68-year-old man presented to our hospital with a 1-month history of slowly progressing altered mental status and gait disturbance. On neurological examination, the patient displayed disorientation with mild left hemiparesis and facial palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass lesion comprising solid parts and multiple cysts in the right temporoparietal region. The mass demonstrated irregular ring-enhancement on contrast administration and was accompanied by extensive perifocal edema [Figure 1a–c]. We suspected metastatic brain tumor and performed whole-body computed tomography (CT). Although no obvious lung cancer was identified, abdominal contrast-enhanced CT revealed multiple hypodense lesions at the head of the pancreas with enlargement of the para-aortic lymph nodes [Figure 2a and b]. Laboratory testing showed: Glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, 30 U/L; glutamic pyruvic transaminase, 66 U/L; alkaline phosphatase, 606 U/L; lactate dehydrogenase, 347 U/L; and g-glutamyl transpeptidase, 362 U/L. These findings were consistent with biliary obstruction and liver damage. The carbohydrate antigen 19–9) level was 87 U/mL (normal, <37 U/mL) and the carcinoembryonic antigen level was 193 ng/mL (normal, <5 ng/mL). Advanced PC was diagnosed (International Union against Cancer tumor-node-metastasis classification, T3N3M1 stage 4) and very poor prognosis was predicted due to the presence of brain metastasis.

Bottom Line: Magnetic resonance imaging and abdominal computed tomography revealed advanced pancreatic cancer (PC) with brain and para-aortic lymph node metastases.Although symptoms improved, the patient died 3 months postoperatively.In general, the prognosis for PC patients with brain metastasis is very poor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Eisyokai Yoshida Hospital, Kobe, Japan.

ABSTRACT
A 68-year-old man presented to our hospital with a 1-month history of slowly progressing altered mental status and gait disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging and abdominal computed tomography revealed advanced pancreatic cancer (PC) with brain and para-aortic lymph node metastases. Gross total resection of the brain metastatic tumor was performed. Although symptoms improved, the patient died 3 months postoperatively. In general, the prognosis for PC patients with brain metastasis is very poor. Surgical resection of brain metastasis may play a very limited role in allowing long-term survival of patients for whom the primary PC is controlled or with particular oncocytic-type tumors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus