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Molecular epidemiology of norovirus in South Korea.

Lee SG, Cho HG, Paik SY - BMB Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: For these reasons, nationwide surveillance for norovirus is active in both clinical and environmental settings in South Korea.Recent studies have reported the emergence of variants and novel recombinants of norovirus.This review will provide information for vaccine development and prediction of new emerging variants of norovirus in South Korea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Korea Zoonosis Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, Iksan 570-390, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Norovirus is a major cause of viral gastroenteritis and a common cause of foodborne and waterborne outbreaks. Norovirus outbreaks are responsible for economic losses, most notably to the public health and food industry field. Norovirus has characteristics such as low infectious dose, prolonged shedding period, strong stability, great diversity, and frequent genome mutations. Besides these characteristics, they are known for rapid and extensive spread in closed settings such as hospitals, hotels, and schools. Norovirus is well known as a major agent of food-poisoning in diverse settings in South Korea. For these reasons, nationwide surveillance for norovirus is active in both clinical and environmental settings in South Korea. Recent studies have reported the emergence of variants and novel recombinants of norovirus. In this review, we summarized studies on the molecular epidemiology and nationwide surveillance of norovirus in South Korea. This review will provide information for vaccine development and prediction of new emerging variants of norovirus in South Korea.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Seasonality of GI and GII NoV infections in South Korea, November 2005 to November 2006.
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Figure 002: Seasonality of GI and GII NoV infections in South Korea, November 2005 to November 2006.

Mentions: NoV infection is well known to occur mainly in the winter season. In South Korea, the seasonality of NoV peaked inDecember, March, and October between 2005 and 2006 (Fig. 2). Data from 2007 to 2008 showed that the incidence of NoVwas highest in November, followed by January and October(26). Park et al. also reported similar results; the seasonality ofNoV peaked in November between 2007 and 2010, with theexception of 2009 (24). According to a recent study, the seasonalityof NoV in South Korea between 2006 and 2013peaked during the winter months, such as November toJanuary (Fig. 3).


Molecular epidemiology of norovirus in South Korea.

Lee SG, Cho HG, Paik SY - BMB Rep (2015)

Seasonality of GI and GII NoV infections in South Korea, November 2005 to November 2006.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352615&req=5

Figure 002: Seasonality of GI and GII NoV infections in South Korea, November 2005 to November 2006.
Mentions: NoV infection is well known to occur mainly in the winter season. In South Korea, the seasonality of NoV peaked inDecember, March, and October between 2005 and 2006 (Fig. 2). Data from 2007 to 2008 showed that the incidence of NoVwas highest in November, followed by January and October(26). Park et al. also reported similar results; the seasonality ofNoV peaked in November between 2007 and 2010, with theexception of 2009 (24). According to a recent study, the seasonalityof NoV in South Korea between 2006 and 2013peaked during the winter months, such as November toJanuary (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: For these reasons, nationwide surveillance for norovirus is active in both clinical and environmental settings in South Korea.Recent studies have reported the emergence of variants and novel recombinants of norovirus.This review will provide information for vaccine development and prediction of new emerging variants of norovirus in South Korea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Korea Zoonosis Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, Iksan 570-390, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Norovirus is a major cause of viral gastroenteritis and a common cause of foodborne and waterborne outbreaks. Norovirus outbreaks are responsible for economic losses, most notably to the public health and food industry field. Norovirus has characteristics such as low infectious dose, prolonged shedding period, strong stability, great diversity, and frequent genome mutations. Besides these characteristics, they are known for rapid and extensive spread in closed settings such as hospitals, hotels, and schools. Norovirus is well known as a major agent of food-poisoning in diverse settings in South Korea. For these reasons, nationwide surveillance for norovirus is active in both clinical and environmental settings in South Korea. Recent studies have reported the emergence of variants and novel recombinants of norovirus. In this review, we summarized studies on the molecular epidemiology and nationwide surveillance of norovirus in South Korea. This review will provide information for vaccine development and prediction of new emerging variants of norovirus in South Korea.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus