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Association between Washing Residue on the Feet and Tinea Pedis in Diabetic Patients.

Takehara K, Amemiya A, Mugita Y, Tsunemi Y, Seko Y, Ohashi Y, Ueki K, Kadowaki T, Oe M, Nagase T, Ikeda M, Sanada H - Nurs Res Pract (2015)

Bottom Line: Our results showed that diabetic patients with TP had higher levels of washing residue on their feet than those without TP.The importance of washing feet to prevent TP needs to be emphasized through educational programs for diabetic patients.Furthermore, the development of an effective foot-washing technique is essential.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nursing Administration, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Tinea pedis (TP) may lead to the development of foot ulcers in diabetic patients; thus, its prevention in diabetic patients is important. TP occurs after dermatophytes on the skin scales of TP patients attach to the feet. Therefore, it is necessary to remove the scales and dermatophytes, and this can be performed using various methods, including foot washing. This study aimed to objectively examine the association between the presence of TP and foot-washing habits. We included 33 diabetic patients, and, of these, 17 had TP. The presence of washing residue on the feet was determined by applying a fluorescent cream to the participants' feet, and images of the feet were captured under ultraviolet light before and after foot washing. Our results showed that diabetic patients with TP had higher levels of washing residue on their feet than those without TP. The importance of washing feet to prevent TP needs to be emphasized through educational programs for diabetic patients. Furthermore, the development of an effective foot-washing technique is essential.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Representative images of patients' feet from both study groups under ultraviolet light before and after foot washing. The blue-white fluorescent areas indicate the presence of fluorescence from the residual cream, and the bluish-black areas represent the absence of fluorescence. (a) The soles of the participant's feet are infected with tinea pedis (TP) before foot washing. (b) The soles of the same participant's feet after foot washing. The fluorescence intensity reduction rate (FIRR) is 34.9%. (c) The soles of the participant's feet do not show TP infection before foot washing. (d) The soles of the same participant's feet after foot washing. The FIRR is 88.6%. (e) Areas between the toes of a participant with TP before foot washing. (f) Areas between the toes of the same participant after foot washing. This participant has residual cream. (g) Areas between the toes of a participant without TP infection before foot washing. (h) Areas between the toes of the same participant after foot washing. This participant has no residual cream. The nails are showing autofluorescence.
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fig1: Representative images of patients' feet from both study groups under ultraviolet light before and after foot washing. The blue-white fluorescent areas indicate the presence of fluorescence from the residual cream, and the bluish-black areas represent the absence of fluorescence. (a) The soles of the participant's feet are infected with tinea pedis (TP) before foot washing. (b) The soles of the same participant's feet after foot washing. The fluorescence intensity reduction rate (FIRR) is 34.9%. (c) The soles of the participant's feet do not show TP infection before foot washing. (d) The soles of the same participant's feet after foot washing. The FIRR is 88.6%. (e) Areas between the toes of a participant with TP before foot washing. (f) Areas between the toes of the same participant after foot washing. This participant has residual cream. (g) Areas between the toes of a participant without TP infection before foot washing. (h) Areas between the toes of the same participant after foot washing. This participant has no residual cream. The nails are showing autofluorescence.

Mentions: Representative images of patients' feet in both study groups captured under UV light before and after foot washing are shown in Figure 1. The mean ± SD wash time was 123.4 ± 64.2 s. The mean ± SD FIRR of the soles of the feet of the TP patients was significantly lower than that of the patients without TP (54.8% ± 23.3% versus 70.5% ± 13.6%; P = 0.025). The number of participants with PFC between the toes was significantly higher in the group of patients with TP than that in the group of patients without TP (64.7% versus 25.0%; P = 0.037) (Table 3).


Association between Washing Residue on the Feet and Tinea Pedis in Diabetic Patients.

Takehara K, Amemiya A, Mugita Y, Tsunemi Y, Seko Y, Ohashi Y, Ueki K, Kadowaki T, Oe M, Nagase T, Ikeda M, Sanada H - Nurs Res Pract (2015)

Representative images of patients' feet from both study groups under ultraviolet light before and after foot washing. The blue-white fluorescent areas indicate the presence of fluorescence from the residual cream, and the bluish-black areas represent the absence of fluorescence. (a) The soles of the participant's feet are infected with tinea pedis (TP) before foot washing. (b) The soles of the same participant's feet after foot washing. The fluorescence intensity reduction rate (FIRR) is 34.9%. (c) The soles of the participant's feet do not show TP infection before foot washing. (d) The soles of the same participant's feet after foot washing. The FIRR is 88.6%. (e) Areas between the toes of a participant with TP before foot washing. (f) Areas between the toes of the same participant after foot washing. This participant has residual cream. (g) Areas between the toes of a participant without TP infection before foot washing. (h) Areas between the toes of the same participant after foot washing. This participant has no residual cream. The nails are showing autofluorescence.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352499&req=5

fig1: Representative images of patients' feet from both study groups under ultraviolet light before and after foot washing. The blue-white fluorescent areas indicate the presence of fluorescence from the residual cream, and the bluish-black areas represent the absence of fluorescence. (a) The soles of the participant's feet are infected with tinea pedis (TP) before foot washing. (b) The soles of the same participant's feet after foot washing. The fluorescence intensity reduction rate (FIRR) is 34.9%. (c) The soles of the participant's feet do not show TP infection before foot washing. (d) The soles of the same participant's feet after foot washing. The FIRR is 88.6%. (e) Areas between the toes of a participant with TP before foot washing. (f) Areas between the toes of the same participant after foot washing. This participant has residual cream. (g) Areas between the toes of a participant without TP infection before foot washing. (h) Areas between the toes of the same participant after foot washing. This participant has no residual cream. The nails are showing autofluorescence.
Mentions: Representative images of patients' feet in both study groups captured under UV light before and after foot washing are shown in Figure 1. The mean ± SD wash time was 123.4 ± 64.2 s. The mean ± SD FIRR of the soles of the feet of the TP patients was significantly lower than that of the patients without TP (54.8% ± 23.3% versus 70.5% ± 13.6%; P = 0.025). The number of participants with PFC between the toes was significantly higher in the group of patients with TP than that in the group of patients without TP (64.7% versus 25.0%; P = 0.037) (Table 3).

Bottom Line: Our results showed that diabetic patients with TP had higher levels of washing residue on their feet than those without TP.The importance of washing feet to prevent TP needs to be emphasized through educational programs for diabetic patients.Furthermore, the development of an effective foot-washing technique is essential.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nursing Administration, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Tinea pedis (TP) may lead to the development of foot ulcers in diabetic patients; thus, its prevention in diabetic patients is important. TP occurs after dermatophytes on the skin scales of TP patients attach to the feet. Therefore, it is necessary to remove the scales and dermatophytes, and this can be performed using various methods, including foot washing. This study aimed to objectively examine the association between the presence of TP and foot-washing habits. We included 33 diabetic patients, and, of these, 17 had TP. The presence of washing residue on the feet was determined by applying a fluorescent cream to the participants' feet, and images of the feet were captured under ultraviolet light before and after foot washing. Our results showed that diabetic patients with TP had higher levels of washing residue on their feet than those without TP. The importance of washing feet to prevent TP needs to be emphasized through educational programs for diabetic patients. Furthermore, the development of an effective foot-washing technique is essential.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus