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Impact of different body positions on bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles in iparous continent women.

Chmielewska D, Stania M, Sobota G, Kwaśna K, Błaszczak E, Taradaj J, Juras G - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Significant differences in mean normalized amplitudes of baseline PFM activity were revealed between standing and lying (P < 0.00024) and lying and ball-sitting positions (P < 0.0053).Pelvic floor muscles activity during voluntary contractions did not differ by position in continent women.Statistically significant differences between the supine lying and sitting positions were only observed during a sustained 60-second contraction of the PFMs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiotherapy Basics, Jerzy Kukuczka Academy of Physical Education, Mikołowska 72a, 40-065 Katowice, Poland.

ABSTRACT
We examined pelvic floor muscles (PFM) activity (%MVC) in twenty iparous women by body position during exercise as well as the activation of abdominal muscles and the gluteus maximus during voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Activation of transversus abdominis, rectus abdominis, and gluteus maximus during voluntary PFM contractions was also assessed. Significant differences in mean normalized amplitudes of baseline PFM activity were revealed between standing and lying (P < 0.00024) and lying and ball-sitting positions (P < 0.0053). Average peak, average time before peak, and average time after peak did not differ significantly during the voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Baseline PFM activity seemed to depend on the body position and was the highest in standing. Pelvic floor muscles activity during voluntary contractions did not differ by position in continent women. Statistically significant differences between the supine lying and sitting positions were only observed during a sustained 60-second contraction of the PFMs.

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Normalized amplitude (%MVC) for rectus abdominis and transversus abdominis in lying, sitting, and standing position during the 10-second relaxation test for pelvic floor muscles.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig3: Normalized amplitude (%MVC) for rectus abdominis and transversus abdominis in lying, sitting, and standing position during the 10-second relaxation test for pelvic floor muscles.

Mentions: Following a 60-second contraction, pelvic floor muscles were capable of relaxation as demonstrated by low sEMG amplitude. Normalized mean amplitude of the sEMG signal was the lowest in supine lying (not significantly lower compared to the standing position) (Figure 3).


Impact of different body positions on bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles in iparous continent women.

Chmielewska D, Stania M, Sobota G, Kwaśna K, Błaszczak E, Taradaj J, Juras G - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Normalized amplitude (%MVC) for rectus abdominis and transversus abdominis in lying, sitting, and standing position during the 10-second relaxation test for pelvic floor muscles.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352464&req=5

fig3: Normalized amplitude (%MVC) for rectus abdominis and transversus abdominis in lying, sitting, and standing position during the 10-second relaxation test for pelvic floor muscles.
Mentions: Following a 60-second contraction, pelvic floor muscles were capable of relaxation as demonstrated by low sEMG amplitude. Normalized mean amplitude of the sEMG signal was the lowest in supine lying (not significantly lower compared to the standing position) (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Significant differences in mean normalized amplitudes of baseline PFM activity were revealed between standing and lying (P < 0.00024) and lying and ball-sitting positions (P < 0.0053).Pelvic floor muscles activity during voluntary contractions did not differ by position in continent women.Statistically significant differences between the supine lying and sitting positions were only observed during a sustained 60-second contraction of the PFMs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiotherapy Basics, Jerzy Kukuczka Academy of Physical Education, Mikołowska 72a, 40-065 Katowice, Poland.

ABSTRACT
We examined pelvic floor muscles (PFM) activity (%MVC) in twenty iparous women by body position during exercise as well as the activation of abdominal muscles and the gluteus maximus during voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Activation of transversus abdominis, rectus abdominis, and gluteus maximus during voluntary PFM contractions was also assessed. Significant differences in mean normalized amplitudes of baseline PFM activity were revealed between standing and lying (P < 0.00024) and lying and ball-sitting positions (P < 0.0053). Average peak, average time before peak, and average time after peak did not differ significantly during the voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Baseline PFM activity seemed to depend on the body position and was the highest in standing. Pelvic floor muscles activity during voluntary contractions did not differ by position in continent women. Statistically significant differences between the supine lying and sitting positions were only observed during a sustained 60-second contraction of the PFMs.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus