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CD69 is the crucial regulator of intestinal inflammation: a new target molecule for IBD treatment?

Radulovic K, Niess JH - J Immunol Res (2015)

Bottom Line: However, recent work has indicated that CD69 plays an essential role for the regulation of inflammatory processes.Particularly, CD69 is highly expressed by lymphocytes at mucosal sites being constantly exposed to the intestinal microflora (one of the nature's most complex and most densely populated microbial habitats) and food antigens, while only a small number of circulating leukocytes express this molecule.In this review we will discuss the role of CD69 in mucosal tissue and consider CD69 as a potential target for the development of novel treatments of intestinal inflammation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: U1019, Team 7, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), 1 rue du Professeur Calmette, 59019 Lille, France ; Center for Infection and Immunity of Lille, Institut Pasteur de Lille, 1 rue du Professeur Calmette, 59019 Lille, France.

ABSTRACT
CD69 has been identified as an early activation marker of lymphocytes. However, recent work has indicated that CD69 plays an essential role for the regulation of inflammatory processes. Particularly, CD69 is highly expressed by lymphocytes at mucosal sites being constantly exposed to the intestinal microflora (one of the nature's most complex and most densely populated microbial habitats) and food antigens, while only a small number of circulating leukocytes express this molecule. In this review we will discuss the role of CD69 in mucosal tissue and consider CD69 as a potential target for the development of novel treatments of intestinal inflammation.

Show MeSH
The structure of CD69 molecule. CD69 is membrane-bound protein, a homodimer of two (28 and 32 kDa) differentially glycosylated subunits. Each subunit consists of extracellular C-type lectin domain (CTLD) connected by the short neck region with the single spanning transmembrane domain and short cytoplasmatic tail. Subunits are connected with the disulfide bridge in the extracellular neck region.
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fig1: The structure of CD69 molecule. CD69 is membrane-bound protein, a homodimer of two (28 and 32 kDa) differentially glycosylated subunits. Each subunit consists of extracellular C-type lectin domain (CTLD) connected by the short neck region with the single spanning transmembrane domain and short cytoplasmatic tail. Subunits are connected with the disulfide bridge in the extracellular neck region.

Mentions: The CD69 gene exists in a single copy. The transcription of CD69 leads to the formation of 22.5 kDa polypeptide which can be differentially glycosylated to form 28 or 32 kDa subunits (Figure 1) [17]. These subunits can be randomly combined to form 28-28, 28-32, or 32-32 kDa receptors [17, 28, 46, 47]. Each subunit consists of an extracellular CTLD domain connected by the short neck region to the single transmembrane domain and short cytoplasmatic tail (Figure 1) [17, 18, 22, 48]. Subunits are connected with the disulfide bridge in the extracellular neck region (Figure 1) [17].


CD69 is the crucial regulator of intestinal inflammation: a new target molecule for IBD treatment?

Radulovic K, Niess JH - J Immunol Res (2015)

The structure of CD69 molecule. CD69 is membrane-bound protein, a homodimer of two (28 and 32 kDa) differentially glycosylated subunits. Each subunit consists of extracellular C-type lectin domain (CTLD) connected by the short neck region with the single spanning transmembrane domain and short cytoplasmatic tail. Subunits are connected with the disulfide bridge in the extracellular neck region.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352431&req=5

fig1: The structure of CD69 molecule. CD69 is membrane-bound protein, a homodimer of two (28 and 32 kDa) differentially glycosylated subunits. Each subunit consists of extracellular C-type lectin domain (CTLD) connected by the short neck region with the single spanning transmembrane domain and short cytoplasmatic tail. Subunits are connected with the disulfide bridge in the extracellular neck region.
Mentions: The CD69 gene exists in a single copy. The transcription of CD69 leads to the formation of 22.5 kDa polypeptide which can be differentially glycosylated to form 28 or 32 kDa subunits (Figure 1) [17]. These subunits can be randomly combined to form 28-28, 28-32, or 32-32 kDa receptors [17, 28, 46, 47]. Each subunit consists of an extracellular CTLD domain connected by the short neck region to the single transmembrane domain and short cytoplasmatic tail (Figure 1) [17, 18, 22, 48]. Subunits are connected with the disulfide bridge in the extracellular neck region (Figure 1) [17].

Bottom Line: However, recent work has indicated that CD69 plays an essential role for the regulation of inflammatory processes.Particularly, CD69 is highly expressed by lymphocytes at mucosal sites being constantly exposed to the intestinal microflora (one of the nature's most complex and most densely populated microbial habitats) and food antigens, while only a small number of circulating leukocytes express this molecule.In this review we will discuss the role of CD69 in mucosal tissue and consider CD69 as a potential target for the development of novel treatments of intestinal inflammation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: U1019, Team 7, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), 1 rue du Professeur Calmette, 59019 Lille, France ; Center for Infection and Immunity of Lille, Institut Pasteur de Lille, 1 rue du Professeur Calmette, 59019 Lille, France.

ABSTRACT
CD69 has been identified as an early activation marker of lymphocytes. However, recent work has indicated that CD69 plays an essential role for the regulation of inflammatory processes. Particularly, CD69 is highly expressed by lymphocytes at mucosal sites being constantly exposed to the intestinal microflora (one of the nature's most complex and most densely populated microbial habitats) and food antigens, while only a small number of circulating leukocytes express this molecule. In this review we will discuss the role of CD69 in mucosal tissue and consider CD69 as a potential target for the development of novel treatments of intestinal inflammation.

Show MeSH