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Isolation and molecular characterization of Brucella isolates in cattle milk in Uganda.

Mugizi DR, Muradrasoli S, Boqvist S, Erume J, Nasinyama GW, Waiswa C, Mboowa G, Klint M, Magnusson U - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Brucellosis is endemic in livestock and humans in Uganda and its transmission involves a multitude of risk factors like consumption of milk from infected cattle.Brucella abortus without a biovar designation was isolated from eleven out of 207 milk samples from cattle in Uganda.These isolates had a genomic monomorphism at 16 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci and showed in turn high levels of genetic variation when compared with other African strains or other B. abortus biovars from other parts of the world.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Bio-Security, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda.

ABSTRACT
Brucellosis is endemic in livestock and humans in Uganda and its transmission involves a multitude of risk factors like consumption of milk from infected cattle. To shed new light on the epidemiology of brucellosis in Uganda the present study used phenotypic and molecular approaches to delineate the Brucella species, biovars, and genotypes shed in cattle milk. Brucella abortus without a biovar designation was isolated from eleven out of 207 milk samples from cattle in Uganda. These isolates had a genomic monomorphism at 16 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci and showed in turn high levels of genetic variation when compared with other African strains or other B. abortus biovars from other parts of the world. This study further highlights the usefulness of MLVA as an epidemiological tool for investigation of Brucella infections.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

MLVA amplification pattern of isolates in this study and a B. suis as control. Lanes 1, 8, and 15 show DNA marker, lane 2 in each gel shows pattern for B. suis, and lanes 3–7 and 9–14 show the amplification pattern of isolates 1–11 (G41/01, S406/02, S37/02, S03/03, S403/07, S406/01, G86/14, S403/12, S403/9, S09/08, and S02/10).
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fig5: MLVA amplification pattern of isolates in this study and a B. suis as control. Lanes 1, 8, and 15 show DNA marker, lane 2 in each gel shows pattern for B. suis, and lanes 3–7 and 9–14 show the amplification pattern of isolates 1–11 (G41/01, S406/02, S37/02, S03/03, S403/07, S406/01, G86/14, S403/12, S403/9, S09/08, and S02/10).

Mentions: The MLVA-16 assay revealed that none of the 11 isolates did match any of the Brucella isolates in the Brucella MLVA 2012 database but closely resembled the former B. abortus biovar 7 strain 07-994-2411 from Kenya (Table 2). All isolates obtained were monomorphic at all loci as shown in Table 2 and Figure 5. We designated these isolates as UG Ba-m because they were isolated from cattle in Uganda and had a B. abortus profile on most biotyping assays but resembled both B. melitensis and B. abortus at genotyping. Both of the UG Ba-m isolates and the B. abortus strain 07-994-2411 showed close resemblance to a human B. melitensis biovar 1 (strain BCCN87-92) strain isolated from USA. When compared on MLVA-8 panel 1 loci the genetic distance was only zero between UG Ba-m isolates and B. abortus strain 07-994-2411 and one was between UG Ba-m isolates and B. melitensis biovar 1 strain BCCN87-92.


Isolation and molecular characterization of Brucella isolates in cattle milk in Uganda.

Mugizi DR, Muradrasoli S, Boqvist S, Erume J, Nasinyama GW, Waiswa C, Mboowa G, Klint M, Magnusson U - Biomed Res Int (2015)

MLVA amplification pattern of isolates in this study and a B. suis as control. Lanes 1, 8, and 15 show DNA marker, lane 2 in each gel shows pattern for B. suis, and lanes 3–7 and 9–14 show the amplification pattern of isolates 1–11 (G41/01, S406/02, S37/02, S03/03, S403/07, S406/01, G86/14, S403/12, S403/9, S09/08, and S02/10).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352423&req=5

fig5: MLVA amplification pattern of isolates in this study and a B. suis as control. Lanes 1, 8, and 15 show DNA marker, lane 2 in each gel shows pattern for B. suis, and lanes 3–7 and 9–14 show the amplification pattern of isolates 1–11 (G41/01, S406/02, S37/02, S03/03, S403/07, S406/01, G86/14, S403/12, S403/9, S09/08, and S02/10).
Mentions: The MLVA-16 assay revealed that none of the 11 isolates did match any of the Brucella isolates in the Brucella MLVA 2012 database but closely resembled the former B. abortus biovar 7 strain 07-994-2411 from Kenya (Table 2). All isolates obtained were monomorphic at all loci as shown in Table 2 and Figure 5. We designated these isolates as UG Ba-m because they were isolated from cattle in Uganda and had a B. abortus profile on most biotyping assays but resembled both B. melitensis and B. abortus at genotyping. Both of the UG Ba-m isolates and the B. abortus strain 07-994-2411 showed close resemblance to a human B. melitensis biovar 1 (strain BCCN87-92) strain isolated from USA. When compared on MLVA-8 panel 1 loci the genetic distance was only zero between UG Ba-m isolates and B. abortus strain 07-994-2411 and one was between UG Ba-m isolates and B. melitensis biovar 1 strain BCCN87-92.

Bottom Line: Brucellosis is endemic in livestock and humans in Uganda and its transmission involves a multitude of risk factors like consumption of milk from infected cattle.Brucella abortus without a biovar designation was isolated from eleven out of 207 milk samples from cattle in Uganda.These isolates had a genomic monomorphism at 16 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci and showed in turn high levels of genetic variation when compared with other African strains or other B. abortus biovars from other parts of the world.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Veterinary Medicine, Animal Resources and Bio-Security, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda.

ABSTRACT
Brucellosis is endemic in livestock and humans in Uganda and its transmission involves a multitude of risk factors like consumption of milk from infected cattle. To shed new light on the epidemiology of brucellosis in Uganda the present study used phenotypic and molecular approaches to delineate the Brucella species, biovars, and genotypes shed in cattle milk. Brucella abortus without a biovar designation was isolated from eleven out of 207 milk samples from cattle in Uganda. These isolates had a genomic monomorphism at 16 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci and showed in turn high levels of genetic variation when compared with other African strains or other B. abortus biovars from other parts of the world. This study further highlights the usefulness of MLVA as an epidemiological tool for investigation of Brucella infections.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus