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Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis in an African male: a case report.

Belayneh DK, Kellerth T - Clin Case Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare manifestation of thyrotoxicosis and is rarely reported in non-Asian populations.A 26-year-old Ethiopian male who presented with recurrent flaccid tetraparesis, hypokalemia, and hyperthyroidism is reported here.Thyroid function should be routinely checked in patients with acute or recurrent hypokalemic paralysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Cardiovascular Hospital Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

ABSTRACT
Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare manifestation of thyrotoxicosis and is rarely reported in non-Asian populations. A 26-year-old Ethiopian male who presented with recurrent flaccid tetraparesis, hypokalemia, and hyperthyroidism is reported here. Thyroid function should be routinely checked in patients with acute or recurrent hypokalemic paralysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Twelve lead electrocardiogram taken a day after admission showing small U waves particularly in the precordial leads.
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fig02: Twelve lead electrocardiogram taken a day after admission showing small U waves particularly in the precordial leads.

Mentions: Serum potassium levels measured over the following 2 days ranged from 4.0 to 4.4 mmol/L. An ECG ≈24 h after arrival (Fig.2) showed sinus rhythm at 94 beats/min with distinct P waves, T wave inversions in the inferior leads, and small U waves in V2 and V3. Treatment with oral propylthiouracil and propranolol was initiated, and he was discharged after 48 h in the hospital.


Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis in an African male: a case report.

Belayneh DK, Kellerth T - Clin Case Rep (2014)

Twelve lead electrocardiogram taken a day after admission showing small U waves particularly in the precordial leads.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352363&req=5

fig02: Twelve lead electrocardiogram taken a day after admission showing small U waves particularly in the precordial leads.
Mentions: Serum potassium levels measured over the following 2 days ranged from 4.0 to 4.4 mmol/L. An ECG ≈24 h after arrival (Fig.2) showed sinus rhythm at 94 beats/min with distinct P waves, T wave inversions in the inferior leads, and small U waves in V2 and V3. Treatment with oral propylthiouracil and propranolol was initiated, and he was discharged after 48 h in the hospital.

Bottom Line: Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare manifestation of thyrotoxicosis and is rarely reported in non-Asian populations.A 26-year-old Ethiopian male who presented with recurrent flaccid tetraparesis, hypokalemia, and hyperthyroidism is reported here.Thyroid function should be routinely checked in patients with acute or recurrent hypokalemic paralysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Cardiovascular Hospital Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

ABSTRACT
Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare manifestation of thyrotoxicosis and is rarely reported in non-Asian populations. A 26-year-old Ethiopian male who presented with recurrent flaccid tetraparesis, hypokalemia, and hyperthyroidism is reported here. Thyroid function should be routinely checked in patients with acute or recurrent hypokalemic paralysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus