Limits...
Sexual traits are sensitive to genetic stress and predict extinction risk in the stalk-eyed fly, Diasemopsis meigenii.

Bellamy L, Chapman N, Fowler K, Pomiankowski A - Evolution (2013)

Bottom Line: However, this hypothesis has received little testing and results are inconsistent.This heterosis was greater in male eyespan than in male wing length, but not female eyespan.The elevated response in male eyespan to genetic stress mirrored the result found using environmental stress during larval development and suggests that common mechanisms underlie the patterns observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, Darwin Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Proportional change in male (solid) and female (dashed) traits over 11 generations of inbreeding, standardized to one in F1, for (A) male and female thorax length, (B) absolute eyespan (gray) and absolute wing length (black), and (C) relative eyespan (gray) and relative wing length (black). Error bars were omitted for clarity.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352335&req=5

fig02: Proportional change in male (solid) and female (dashed) traits over 11 generations of inbreeding, standardized to one in F1, for (A) male and female thorax length, (B) absolute eyespan (gray) and absolute wing length (black), and (C) relative eyespan (gray) and relative wing length (black). Error bars were omitted for clarity.

Mentions: Male and female thorax length both suffered from inbreeding depression (males,  = 0.051, F1, 362.8 = 195.722, P < 0.001; females,  = 0.051, F1, 370.3 = 143.875, P < 0.001; Fig.2A). This pattern was also evident in absolute eyespan in both sexes (males,  = 0.080, F1, 381.7 = 412.927, P < 0.001; females,  = 0.060, F1, 406.8 = 284.005, P < 0.001; Fig.2B) and persisted for relative eyespan after controlling for thorax length (males,  = 0.061, F1, 422.1 = 272.912, P < 0.001; females,  = 0.043, F1, 428.0 = 202.341, P < 0.001; Fig.2C). The pattern for wing length was much less pronounced compared to thorax and eyespan. There was a net decrease in male and female wing length over 11 generations, both for absolute wing length (males,  = 0.026, F1, 387.5 = 29.453, P < 0.001; females,  = 0.024, F1, 353.6 = 353.6, P < 0.001; Fig.2B) and relative wing length after controlling for thorax length (males,  = 0.014, F1, 425.5 = 4.102, P = 0.044; females,  = 0.012, F1, 368.8 = 9.641, P = 0.002; Fig.2C).


Sexual traits are sensitive to genetic stress and predict extinction risk in the stalk-eyed fly, Diasemopsis meigenii.

Bellamy L, Chapman N, Fowler K, Pomiankowski A - Evolution (2013)

Proportional change in male (solid) and female (dashed) traits over 11 generations of inbreeding, standardized to one in F1, for (A) male and female thorax length, (B) absolute eyespan (gray) and absolute wing length (black), and (C) relative eyespan (gray) and relative wing length (black). Error bars were omitted for clarity.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352335&req=5

fig02: Proportional change in male (solid) and female (dashed) traits over 11 generations of inbreeding, standardized to one in F1, for (A) male and female thorax length, (B) absolute eyespan (gray) and absolute wing length (black), and (C) relative eyespan (gray) and relative wing length (black). Error bars were omitted for clarity.
Mentions: Male and female thorax length both suffered from inbreeding depression (males,  = 0.051, F1, 362.8 = 195.722, P < 0.001; females,  = 0.051, F1, 370.3 = 143.875, P < 0.001; Fig.2A). This pattern was also evident in absolute eyespan in both sexes (males,  = 0.080, F1, 381.7 = 412.927, P < 0.001; females,  = 0.060, F1, 406.8 = 284.005, P < 0.001; Fig.2B) and persisted for relative eyespan after controlling for thorax length (males,  = 0.061, F1, 422.1 = 272.912, P < 0.001; females,  = 0.043, F1, 428.0 = 202.341, P < 0.001; Fig.2C). The pattern for wing length was much less pronounced compared to thorax and eyespan. There was a net decrease in male and female wing length over 11 generations, both for absolute wing length (males,  = 0.026, F1, 387.5 = 29.453, P < 0.001; females,  = 0.024, F1, 353.6 = 353.6, P < 0.001; Fig.2B) and relative wing length after controlling for thorax length (males,  = 0.014, F1, 425.5 = 4.102, P = 0.044; females,  = 0.012, F1, 368.8 = 9.641, P = 0.002; Fig.2C).

Bottom Line: However, this hypothesis has received little testing and results are inconsistent.This heterosis was greater in male eyespan than in male wing length, but not female eyespan.The elevated response in male eyespan to genetic stress mirrored the result found using environmental stress during larval development and suggests that common mechanisms underlie the patterns observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, Darwin Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus