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Here's looking at you, kid: attention to infant emotional faces in mothers and non-mothers.

Thompson-Booth C, Viding E, Mayes LC, Rutherford HJ, Hodsoll S, McCrory EJ - Dev Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: This effect was modulated by parental status, such that mothers compared to non-mothers showed longer response times to infant compared to adult faces.Finally, it was found that greater levels of mothers' self-reported parental distress was associated with less task interference when processing infant faces.We suggest that alterations in attentional processing in motherhood may constitute an adaptive behavioural change associated with becoming a parent.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, UK.

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Mean RT to correct response for each experimental condition as a function of stimulus type.
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fig03: Mean RT to correct response for each experimental condition as a function of stimulus type.

Mentions: Finally, there was also a Face Age by Search condition interaction (F(2, 126) = 74.27, p < .001, ηp2 = .54). This indicates that the Search condition (i.e. whether a task-irrelevant emotion was present or not) affected RTs to correct responses differently for adult and infant facial stimuli. To further investigate this interaction, contrasts were performed comparing RTs to correct responses in emotional singleton conditions to RTs in neutral conditions across adult and infant stimuli. These revealed that the effect of longer RTs for emotional target conditions as compared to neutral conditions was particularly pronounced for infant stimuli as compared to adult stimuli (F(1, 63) = 97.35, p < .001, ηp2 = .61, see Figure3). There were no other group interactions or other interactions.


Here's looking at you, kid: attention to infant emotional faces in mothers and non-mothers.

Thompson-Booth C, Viding E, Mayes LC, Rutherford HJ, Hodsoll S, McCrory EJ - Dev Sci (2013)

Mean RT to correct response for each experimental condition as a function of stimulus type.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352331&req=5

fig03: Mean RT to correct response for each experimental condition as a function of stimulus type.
Mentions: Finally, there was also a Face Age by Search condition interaction (F(2, 126) = 74.27, p < .001, ηp2 = .54). This indicates that the Search condition (i.e. whether a task-irrelevant emotion was present or not) affected RTs to correct responses differently for adult and infant facial stimuli. To further investigate this interaction, contrasts were performed comparing RTs to correct responses in emotional singleton conditions to RTs in neutral conditions across adult and infant stimuli. These revealed that the effect of longer RTs for emotional target conditions as compared to neutral conditions was particularly pronounced for infant stimuli as compared to adult stimuli (F(1, 63) = 97.35, p < .001, ηp2 = .61, see Figure3). There were no other group interactions or other interactions.

Bottom Line: This effect was modulated by parental status, such that mothers compared to non-mothers showed longer response times to infant compared to adult faces.Finally, it was found that greater levels of mothers' self-reported parental distress was associated with less task interference when processing infant faces.We suggest that alterations in attentional processing in motherhood may constitute an adaptive behavioural change associated with becoming a parent.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus