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HIV and STI prevalence and injection behaviors among people who inject drugs in Nairobi: results from a 2011 bio-behavioral study using respondent-driven sampling.

Tun W, Sheehy M, Broz D, Okal J, Muraguri N, Raymond HF, Musyoki H, Kim AA, Muthui M, Geibel S - AIDS Behav (2015)

Bottom Line: An estimated 67.3 % engaged in at least one risky injection practice in a typical month.HIV prevalence was 18.7 % (95 % CI 12.3-26.7), while STI prevalence was lower [syphilis: 1.7 % (95 % CI 0.2-6.0); gonorrhea: 1.5 % (95 % CI 0.1-4.9); and Chlamydia: 4.2 % (95 % CI 1.2-7.8)].Comprehensive harm reduction programs tailored toward PWID and their sex partners must be fully implemented as part of Kenya's national HIV prevention strategy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: HIV and AIDS Program, Population Council, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 280, Washington, DC, 20008, USA, wtun@popcouncil.org.

ABSTRACT
There is a dearth of evidence on injection drug use and associated HIV infections in Kenya. To generate population-based estimates of characteristics and HIV/STI prevalence among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Nairobi, a cross-sectional study was conducted with 269 PWID using respondent-driven sampling. PWID were predominantly male (92.5 %). An estimated 67.3 % engaged in at least one risky injection practice in a typical month. HIV prevalence was 18.7 % (95 % CI 12.3-26.7), while STI prevalence was lower [syphilis: 1.7 % (95 % CI 0.2-6.0); gonorrhea: 1.5 % (95 % CI 0.1-4.9); and Chlamydia: 4.2 % (95 % CI 1.2-7.8)]. HIV infection was associated with being female (aOR, 3.5; p = 0.048), having first injected drugs 5 or more years ago (aOR, 4.3; p = 0.002), and ever having practiced receptive syringe sharing (aOR, 6.2; p = 0.001). Comprehensive harm reduction programs tailored toward PWID and their sex partners must be fully implemented as part of Kenya's national HIV prevention strategy.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Network diagram of PWID recruitment chain referral in Nairobi, 2011 (N = 275), by HIV serostatus and lifetime sharing of needle or syringe. Larger shapes depict seed participants (n = 6); smaller shapes are recruited respondents (n = 269). Gray HIV-seronegative respondents (n = 212; 1 seeds). Black HIV-seropositive respondents (n = 57; 5 seeds). Square Ever receptive syringe sharing (n = 151; 4 seeds). Circle Never receptive syringe sharing (n = 118; 2 seeds)
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Fig1: Network diagram of PWID recruitment chain referral in Nairobi, 2011 (N = 275), by HIV serostatus and lifetime sharing of needle or syringe. Larger shapes depict seed participants (n = 6); smaller shapes are recruited respondents (n = 269). Gray HIV-seronegative respondents (n = 212; 1 seeds). Black HIV-seropositive respondents (n = 57; 5 seeds). Square Ever receptive syringe sharing (n = 151; 4 seeds). Circle Never receptive syringe sharing (n = 118; 2 seeds)

Mentions: Of the 352 PWID screened for eligibility between January and March 2011, six were seed participants and 77 were found to be ineligible, yielding an analytic sample of 269 non-seed participants who completed the survey and testing. Figure 1 illustrates the network recruitment chains. Demographic characteristics and risk behaviors are presented in Table 1. The median age of PWID was 31 years. In adjusted analysis, the majority were male (92.5 %), 16.9 % were currently married and 58.6 % were previously married. PWID mainly earned money through informal or irregular employment, with only 11.4 % of the population having formal employment. Nearly one out of five (18.8 %) earned income through illegal activities and/or sex work.Fig. 1


HIV and STI prevalence and injection behaviors among people who inject drugs in Nairobi: results from a 2011 bio-behavioral study using respondent-driven sampling.

Tun W, Sheehy M, Broz D, Okal J, Muraguri N, Raymond HF, Musyoki H, Kim AA, Muthui M, Geibel S - AIDS Behav (2015)

Network diagram of PWID recruitment chain referral in Nairobi, 2011 (N = 275), by HIV serostatus and lifetime sharing of needle or syringe. Larger shapes depict seed participants (n = 6); smaller shapes are recruited respondents (n = 269). Gray HIV-seronegative respondents (n = 212; 1 seeds). Black HIV-seropositive respondents (n = 57; 5 seeds). Square Ever receptive syringe sharing (n = 151; 4 seeds). Circle Never receptive syringe sharing (n = 118; 2 seeds)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352193&req=5

Fig1: Network diagram of PWID recruitment chain referral in Nairobi, 2011 (N = 275), by HIV serostatus and lifetime sharing of needle or syringe. Larger shapes depict seed participants (n = 6); smaller shapes are recruited respondents (n = 269). Gray HIV-seronegative respondents (n = 212; 1 seeds). Black HIV-seropositive respondents (n = 57; 5 seeds). Square Ever receptive syringe sharing (n = 151; 4 seeds). Circle Never receptive syringe sharing (n = 118; 2 seeds)
Mentions: Of the 352 PWID screened for eligibility between January and March 2011, six were seed participants and 77 were found to be ineligible, yielding an analytic sample of 269 non-seed participants who completed the survey and testing. Figure 1 illustrates the network recruitment chains. Demographic characteristics and risk behaviors are presented in Table 1. The median age of PWID was 31 years. In adjusted analysis, the majority were male (92.5 %), 16.9 % were currently married and 58.6 % were previously married. PWID mainly earned money through informal or irregular employment, with only 11.4 % of the population having formal employment. Nearly one out of five (18.8 %) earned income through illegal activities and/or sex work.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: An estimated 67.3 % engaged in at least one risky injection practice in a typical month.HIV prevalence was 18.7 % (95 % CI 12.3-26.7), while STI prevalence was lower [syphilis: 1.7 % (95 % CI 0.2-6.0); gonorrhea: 1.5 % (95 % CI 0.1-4.9); and Chlamydia: 4.2 % (95 % CI 1.2-7.8)].Comprehensive harm reduction programs tailored toward PWID and their sex partners must be fully implemented as part of Kenya's national HIV prevention strategy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: HIV and AIDS Program, Population Council, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 280, Washington, DC, 20008, USA, wtun@popcouncil.org.

ABSTRACT
There is a dearth of evidence on injection drug use and associated HIV infections in Kenya. To generate population-based estimates of characteristics and HIV/STI prevalence among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Nairobi, a cross-sectional study was conducted with 269 PWID using respondent-driven sampling. PWID were predominantly male (92.5 %). An estimated 67.3 % engaged in at least one risky injection practice in a typical month. HIV prevalence was 18.7 % (95 % CI 12.3-26.7), while STI prevalence was lower [syphilis: 1.7 % (95 % CI 0.2-6.0); gonorrhea: 1.5 % (95 % CI 0.1-4.9); and Chlamydia: 4.2 % (95 % CI 1.2-7.8)]. HIV infection was associated with being female (aOR, 3.5; p = 0.048), having first injected drugs 5 or more years ago (aOR, 4.3; p = 0.002), and ever having practiced receptive syringe sharing (aOR, 6.2; p = 0.001). Comprehensive harm reduction programs tailored toward PWID and their sex partners must be fully implemented as part of Kenya's national HIV prevention strategy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus