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Current status of clinically available bioresorbable scaffolds in percutaneous coronary interventions.

Felix C, Everaert B, Diletti R, Van Mieghem N, Daemen J, Valgimigli M, de Jaegere PP, Zijlstra F, Regar E, Simsek C, Onuma Y, van Geuns RJ - Neth Heart J (2015)

Bottom Line: Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds are the next step in percutaneous coronary interventions introducing the concept of supporting the natural healing process following initial intervention without leaving any foreign body materials resulting in late adverse events.The first-generation devices have shown encouraging results in multiple studies of selected patients up to the point of full bioresorption, supporting the introduction in regular patient care.During its introduction in daily clinical practice outside the previously selected patient groups, a careful approach should be followed in which outcome is continuously monitored.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Thoraxcentre, Room Ba-585, Erasmus University Medical Centre, 'S-Gravendijkwal 230, 3015, Rotterdam, GE, The Netherlands, c.felix@erasmusmc.nl.

ABSTRACT
Drug-eluting stents (DES) are widely used as first choice devices in percutaneous coronary interventions. However, certain concerns are associated with the use of DES, i.e. delayed arterial healing with a subsequent risk of neo-atherosclerosis, late stent thrombosis and hypersensitivity reactions to the DES polymer. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds are the next step in percutaneous coronary interventions introducing the concept of supporting the natural healing process following initial intervention without leaving any foreign body materials resulting in late adverse events. The first-generation devices have shown encouraging results in multiple studies of selected patients up to the point of full bioresorption, supporting the introduction in regular patient care. During its introduction in daily clinical practice outside the previously selected patient groups, a careful approach should be followed in which outcome is continuously monitored.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Optical coherence tomography images of coronary arteries from matched sites at 6 months (a–c) and 5 years (d–f) after BVS implantation
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Fig1: Optical coherence tomography images of coronary arteries from matched sites at 6 months (a–c) and 5 years (d–f) after BVS implantation

Mentions: After 2 years, invasive coronary imaging studies showed that the BVS were largely absorbed and had been incorporated into the vessel wall. The remaining strut parts were apposed and late lumen enlargement could be demonstrated. Vasomotion and endothelial function were evaluated after intracoronary injection of methergin (a vasoconstrictor) and acetylcholine (an endothelium-dependent vasodilatator). This confirmed restoration of normal endothelium-dependent vessel wall function after degradation of the vascular scaffold ([8], Fig. 1).Fig. 1


Current status of clinically available bioresorbable scaffolds in percutaneous coronary interventions.

Felix C, Everaert B, Diletti R, Van Mieghem N, Daemen J, Valgimigli M, de Jaegere PP, Zijlstra F, Regar E, Simsek C, Onuma Y, van Geuns RJ - Neth Heart J (2015)

Optical coherence tomography images of coronary arteries from matched sites at 6 months (a–c) and 5 years (d–f) after BVS implantation
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352158&req=5

Fig1: Optical coherence tomography images of coronary arteries from matched sites at 6 months (a–c) and 5 years (d–f) after BVS implantation
Mentions: After 2 years, invasive coronary imaging studies showed that the BVS were largely absorbed and had been incorporated into the vessel wall. The remaining strut parts were apposed and late lumen enlargement could be demonstrated. Vasomotion and endothelial function were evaluated after intracoronary injection of methergin (a vasoconstrictor) and acetylcholine (an endothelium-dependent vasodilatator). This confirmed restoration of normal endothelium-dependent vessel wall function after degradation of the vascular scaffold ([8], Fig. 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds are the next step in percutaneous coronary interventions introducing the concept of supporting the natural healing process following initial intervention without leaving any foreign body materials resulting in late adverse events.The first-generation devices have shown encouraging results in multiple studies of selected patients up to the point of full bioresorption, supporting the introduction in regular patient care.During its introduction in daily clinical practice outside the previously selected patient groups, a careful approach should be followed in which outcome is continuously monitored.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Thoraxcentre, Room Ba-585, Erasmus University Medical Centre, 'S-Gravendijkwal 230, 3015, Rotterdam, GE, The Netherlands, c.felix@erasmusmc.nl.

ABSTRACT
Drug-eluting stents (DES) are widely used as first choice devices in percutaneous coronary interventions. However, certain concerns are associated with the use of DES, i.e. delayed arterial healing with a subsequent risk of neo-atherosclerosis, late stent thrombosis and hypersensitivity reactions to the DES polymer. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds are the next step in percutaneous coronary interventions introducing the concept of supporting the natural healing process following initial intervention without leaving any foreign body materials resulting in late adverse events. The first-generation devices have shown encouraging results in multiple studies of selected patients up to the point of full bioresorption, supporting the introduction in regular patient care. During its introduction in daily clinical practice outside the previously selected patient groups, a careful approach should be followed in which outcome is continuously monitored.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus