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Prenatal stress enhances excitatory synaptic transmission and impairs long-term potentiation in the frontal cortex of adult offspring rats.

Sowa J, Bobula B, Glombik K, Slusarczyk J, Basta-Kaim A, Hess G - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In ex vivo frontal cortex slices originating from prenatally stressed animals, the amplitude of extracellular field potentials (FPs) recorded in cortical layer II/III was larger, and the mean amplitude ratio of pharmacologically-isolated NMDA to the AMPA/kainate component of the field potential--smaller than in control preparations.These effects were accompanied by an increase in the mean frequency, but not the mean amplitude, of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in layer II/III pyramidal neurons.These data demonstrate that stress during pregnancy may lead not only to behavioral disturbances, but also impairs the glutamatergic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity in the frontal cortex of the adult offspring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow, Poland.

ABSTRACT
The effects of prenatal stress procedure were investigated in 3 months old male rats. Prenatally stressed rats showed depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test, including increased immobility, decreased mobility and decreased climbing. In ex vivo frontal cortex slices originating from prenatally stressed animals, the amplitude of extracellular field potentials (FPs) recorded in cortical layer II/III was larger, and the mean amplitude ratio of pharmacologically-isolated NMDA to the AMPA/kainate component of the field potential--smaller than in control preparations. Prenatal stress also resulted in a reduced magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP). These effects were accompanied by an increase in the mean frequency, but not the mean amplitude, of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in layer II/III pyramidal neurons. These data demonstrate that stress during pregnancy may lead not only to behavioral disturbances, but also impairs the glutamatergic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity in the frontal cortex of the adult offspring.

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Prenatal stress impairs the induction of LTP.(A) Plot of the amplitude of FPs (mean ± SEM) recorded in slices obtained from control rats (white circles) and from rats subjected to prenatal stress (black circles). Arrows denote the time of theta-burst stimulation (TBS, repeated 3 times). Insets show superposition of FPs recorded during representative experiments before and after TBS at times indicated by numbers. (B) Mean (± SEM) amplitude of FPs recorded between 60–75 min after TBS in slices prepared from control (n = 10) and prenatally stressed (n = 10) rats. The numbers on the bars indicate the numbers of slices in each group. *** p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U test.
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pone.0119407.g005: Prenatal stress impairs the induction of LTP.(A) Plot of the amplitude of FPs (mean ± SEM) recorded in slices obtained from control rats (white circles) and from rats subjected to prenatal stress (black circles). Arrows denote the time of theta-burst stimulation (TBS, repeated 3 times). Insets show superposition of FPs recorded during representative experiments before and after TBS at times indicated by numbers. (B) Mean (± SEM) amplitude of FPs recorded between 60–75 min after TBS in slices prepared from control (n = 10) and prenatally stressed (n = 10) rats. The numbers on the bars indicate the numbers of slices in each group. *** p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U test.

Mentions: In the slices prepared from control rats the mean amplitude of FPs, measured between 60–75 min after TBS, was 139.9 ± 3.9% of baseline (Fig. 5A). LTP was significantly attenuated in the slices obtained from stressed animals (121.0 ± 4.8%; p < 0.001; Fig. 5B).


Prenatal stress enhances excitatory synaptic transmission and impairs long-term potentiation in the frontal cortex of adult offspring rats.

Sowa J, Bobula B, Glombik K, Slusarczyk J, Basta-Kaim A, Hess G - PLoS ONE (2015)

Prenatal stress impairs the induction of LTP.(A) Plot of the amplitude of FPs (mean ± SEM) recorded in slices obtained from control rats (white circles) and from rats subjected to prenatal stress (black circles). Arrows denote the time of theta-burst stimulation (TBS, repeated 3 times). Insets show superposition of FPs recorded during representative experiments before and after TBS at times indicated by numbers. (B) Mean (± SEM) amplitude of FPs recorded between 60–75 min after TBS in slices prepared from control (n = 10) and prenatally stressed (n = 10) rats. The numbers on the bars indicate the numbers of slices in each group. *** p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U test.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352064&req=5

pone.0119407.g005: Prenatal stress impairs the induction of LTP.(A) Plot of the amplitude of FPs (mean ± SEM) recorded in slices obtained from control rats (white circles) and from rats subjected to prenatal stress (black circles). Arrows denote the time of theta-burst stimulation (TBS, repeated 3 times). Insets show superposition of FPs recorded during representative experiments before and after TBS at times indicated by numbers. (B) Mean (± SEM) amplitude of FPs recorded between 60–75 min after TBS in slices prepared from control (n = 10) and prenatally stressed (n = 10) rats. The numbers on the bars indicate the numbers of slices in each group. *** p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U test.
Mentions: In the slices prepared from control rats the mean amplitude of FPs, measured between 60–75 min after TBS, was 139.9 ± 3.9% of baseline (Fig. 5A). LTP was significantly attenuated in the slices obtained from stressed animals (121.0 ± 4.8%; p < 0.001; Fig. 5B).

Bottom Line: In ex vivo frontal cortex slices originating from prenatally stressed animals, the amplitude of extracellular field potentials (FPs) recorded in cortical layer II/III was larger, and the mean amplitude ratio of pharmacologically-isolated NMDA to the AMPA/kainate component of the field potential--smaller than in control preparations.These effects were accompanied by an increase in the mean frequency, but not the mean amplitude, of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in layer II/III pyramidal neurons.These data demonstrate that stress during pregnancy may lead not only to behavioral disturbances, but also impairs the glutamatergic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity in the frontal cortex of the adult offspring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow, Poland.

ABSTRACT
The effects of prenatal stress procedure were investigated in 3 months old male rats. Prenatally stressed rats showed depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test, including increased immobility, decreased mobility and decreased climbing. In ex vivo frontal cortex slices originating from prenatally stressed animals, the amplitude of extracellular field potentials (FPs) recorded in cortical layer II/III was larger, and the mean amplitude ratio of pharmacologically-isolated NMDA to the AMPA/kainate component of the field potential--smaller than in control preparations. Prenatal stress also resulted in a reduced magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP). These effects were accompanied by an increase in the mean frequency, but not the mean amplitude, of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in layer II/III pyramidal neurons. These data demonstrate that stress during pregnancy may lead not only to behavioral disturbances, but also impairs the glutamatergic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity in the frontal cortex of the adult offspring.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus