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High-resolution microbial community succession of microbially induced concrete corrosion in working sanitary manholes.

Ling AL, Robertson CE, Harris JK, Frank DN, Kotter CV, Stevens MJ, Pace NR, Hernandez MT - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In this study, the succession of microbes associated with corroding concrete was characterized over a one-year monitoring campaign using rRNA sequence-based phylogenetic methods.Microbial communities associated with corrosion fronts presented distinct succession patterns which converged to markedly low α-diversity levels (< 10 taxa) in conjunction with decreasing pH.Early communities exposed to alkaline surface pH presented relatively high α-diversity, including heterotrophic, nitrogen-fixing, and sulfur-oxidizing genera, and one community exposed to neutral surface pH presented a diverse transition community comprised of less than 20% sulfur-oxidizers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, 80309, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Microbially-induced concrete corrosion in headspaces threatens wastewater infrastructure worldwide. Models for predicting corrosion rates in sewer pipe networks rely largely on information from culture-based investigations. In this study, the succession of microbes associated with corroding concrete was characterized over a one-year monitoring campaign using rRNA sequence-based phylogenetic methods. New concrete specimens were exposed in two highly corrosive manholes (high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide gas) on the Colorado Front Range for up to a year. Community succession on corroding surfaces was assessed using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S bacterial rRNA amplicons and Sanger sequencing of 16S universal rRNA clones. Microbial communities associated with corrosion fronts presented distinct succession patterns which converged to markedly low α-diversity levels (< 10 taxa) in conjunction with decreasing pH. The microbial community succession pattern observed in this study agreed with culture-based models that implicate acidophilic sulfur-oxidizer Acidithiobacillus spp. in advanced communities, with two notable exceptions. Early communities exposed to alkaline surface pH presented relatively high α-diversity, including heterotrophic, nitrogen-fixing, and sulfur-oxidizing genera, and one community exposed to neutral surface pH presented a diverse transition community comprised of less than 20% sulfur-oxidizers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Estimated bacterial community α-diversity in corrosion products as judged by Chao1 using Illumina MiSeq V1V2 16S amplicon sequencing (black square) and estimated pore water pH (grey diamond) after one to twelve months of exposure in a manhole environment.Error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals for 1,000 bootstrap calculations of Chao1.
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pone.0116400.g002: Estimated bacterial community α-diversity in corrosion products as judged by Chao1 using Illumina MiSeq V1V2 16S amplicon sequencing (black square) and estimated pore water pH (grey diamond) after one to twelve months of exposure in a manhole environment.Error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals for 1,000 bootstrap calculations of Chao1.

Mentions: Bacterial α-diversity on samples in MH2 consistently decreased over the course of each experiment (regression p<0.1) (Fig. 2). This trend coincides with a rapid drop in pore water pH (Fig. 2). In specimens from MH1 (Experiment 1), pore water pH dropped at a slower rate than in MH2, and α-diversity increased for six months before eventually decreasing. In MH1, the transition from alkaline, fresh concrete to acidic, corroded concrete was more gradual. This resulted in sustained neutral pore water pH, which selected for a heterogenous neutrophilic microbial community. The estimated α-diversity dropped below 20 taxa after three months in MH2 or ten months in MH1. This is atypically low for environmental microbial communities [38], and it illustrates the extreme conditions present that are parallel to water quality conditions in acid mine drainage enviroments [39]. Selection pressure from one primary energy source (H2S) and very acidic conditions (pH<2) likely caused very low α-diversity in very close proximity to domestic wastewater.


High-resolution microbial community succession of microbially induced concrete corrosion in working sanitary manholes.

Ling AL, Robertson CE, Harris JK, Frank DN, Kotter CV, Stevens MJ, Pace NR, Hernandez MT - PLoS ONE (2015)

Estimated bacterial community α-diversity in corrosion products as judged by Chao1 using Illumina MiSeq V1V2 16S amplicon sequencing (black square) and estimated pore water pH (grey diamond) after one to twelve months of exposure in a manhole environment.Error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals for 1,000 bootstrap calculations of Chao1.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352008&req=5

pone.0116400.g002: Estimated bacterial community α-diversity in corrosion products as judged by Chao1 using Illumina MiSeq V1V2 16S amplicon sequencing (black square) and estimated pore water pH (grey diamond) after one to twelve months of exposure in a manhole environment.Error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals for 1,000 bootstrap calculations of Chao1.
Mentions: Bacterial α-diversity on samples in MH2 consistently decreased over the course of each experiment (regression p<0.1) (Fig. 2). This trend coincides with a rapid drop in pore water pH (Fig. 2). In specimens from MH1 (Experiment 1), pore water pH dropped at a slower rate than in MH2, and α-diversity increased for six months before eventually decreasing. In MH1, the transition from alkaline, fresh concrete to acidic, corroded concrete was more gradual. This resulted in sustained neutral pore water pH, which selected for a heterogenous neutrophilic microbial community. The estimated α-diversity dropped below 20 taxa after three months in MH2 or ten months in MH1. This is atypically low for environmental microbial communities [38], and it illustrates the extreme conditions present that are parallel to water quality conditions in acid mine drainage enviroments [39]. Selection pressure from one primary energy source (H2S) and very acidic conditions (pH<2) likely caused very low α-diversity in very close proximity to domestic wastewater.

Bottom Line: In this study, the succession of microbes associated with corroding concrete was characterized over a one-year monitoring campaign using rRNA sequence-based phylogenetic methods.Microbial communities associated with corrosion fronts presented distinct succession patterns which converged to markedly low α-diversity levels (< 10 taxa) in conjunction with decreasing pH.Early communities exposed to alkaline surface pH presented relatively high α-diversity, including heterotrophic, nitrogen-fixing, and sulfur-oxidizing genera, and one community exposed to neutral surface pH presented a diverse transition community comprised of less than 20% sulfur-oxidizers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, 80309, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Microbially-induced concrete corrosion in headspaces threatens wastewater infrastructure worldwide. Models for predicting corrosion rates in sewer pipe networks rely largely on information from culture-based investigations. In this study, the succession of microbes associated with corroding concrete was characterized over a one-year monitoring campaign using rRNA sequence-based phylogenetic methods. New concrete specimens were exposed in two highly corrosive manholes (high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide gas) on the Colorado Front Range for up to a year. Community succession on corroding surfaces was assessed using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S bacterial rRNA amplicons and Sanger sequencing of 16S universal rRNA clones. Microbial communities associated with corrosion fronts presented distinct succession patterns which converged to markedly low α-diversity levels (< 10 taxa) in conjunction with decreasing pH. The microbial community succession pattern observed in this study agreed with culture-based models that implicate acidophilic sulfur-oxidizer Acidithiobacillus spp. in advanced communities, with two notable exceptions. Early communities exposed to alkaline surface pH presented relatively high α-diversity, including heterotrophic, nitrogen-fixing, and sulfur-oxidizing genera, and one community exposed to neutral surface pH presented a diverse transition community comprised of less than 20% sulfur-oxidizers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus