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High-resolution microbial community succession of microbially induced concrete corrosion in working sanitary manholes.

Ling AL, Robertson CE, Harris JK, Frank DN, Kotter CV, Stevens MJ, Pace NR, Hernandez MT - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In this study, the succession of microbes associated with corroding concrete was characterized over a one-year monitoring campaign using rRNA sequence-based phylogenetic methods.Microbial communities associated with corrosion fronts presented distinct succession patterns which converged to markedly low α-diversity levels (< 10 taxa) in conjunction with decreasing pH.Early communities exposed to alkaline surface pH presented relatively high α-diversity, including heterotrophic, nitrogen-fixing, and sulfur-oxidizing genera, and one community exposed to neutral surface pH presented a diverse transition community comprised of less than 20% sulfur-oxidizers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, 80309, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Microbially-induced concrete corrosion in headspaces threatens wastewater infrastructure worldwide. Models for predicting corrosion rates in sewer pipe networks rely largely on information from culture-based investigations. In this study, the succession of microbes associated with corroding concrete was characterized over a one-year monitoring campaign using rRNA sequence-based phylogenetic methods. New concrete specimens were exposed in two highly corrosive manholes (high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide gas) on the Colorado Front Range for up to a year. Community succession on corroding surfaces was assessed using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S bacterial rRNA amplicons and Sanger sequencing of 16S universal rRNA clones. Microbial communities associated with corrosion fronts presented distinct succession patterns which converged to markedly low α-diversity levels (< 10 taxa) in conjunction with decreasing pH. The microbial community succession pattern observed in this study agreed with culture-based models that implicate acidophilic sulfur-oxidizer Acidithiobacillus spp. in advanced communities, with two notable exceptions. Early communities exposed to alkaline surface pH presented relatively high α-diversity, including heterotrophic, nitrogen-fixing, and sulfur-oxidizing genera, and one community exposed to neutral surface pH presented a diverse transition community comprised of less than 20% sulfur-oxidizers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cubic concrete specimens after exposure to corrosive environments in a wastewater manhole.Corroded material was removed and specimens were dried prior to photographing.
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pone.0116400.g001: Cubic concrete specimens after exposure to corrosive environments in a wastewater manhole.Corroded material was removed and specimens were dried prior to photographing.

Mentions: As judged by regression of gravimetric data and surface area assessments specimens exposed to the atmosphere in MH2 (Experiments 2A and 2B) experienced more mass loss and surface corrosion than those exposed to the atmosphere in MH1 (Experiment 1) (ANCOVA p<0.01 for both parameters). In all cases hydrogen sulfide levels were significantly higher in MH2 than the downstream MH1. Lower hydrogen sulfide gas concentrations in MH1 likely facilitated slower diffusion of hydrogen sulfide to the concrete surface moisture, resulting in reduced amounts of substrate for acidogenic bacteria. Fig. 1 shows each specimen after removal of corrosion product.


High-resolution microbial community succession of microbially induced concrete corrosion in working sanitary manholes.

Ling AL, Robertson CE, Harris JK, Frank DN, Kotter CV, Stevens MJ, Pace NR, Hernandez MT - PLoS ONE (2015)

Cubic concrete specimens after exposure to corrosive environments in a wastewater manhole.Corroded material was removed and specimens were dried prior to photographing.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4352008&req=5

pone.0116400.g001: Cubic concrete specimens after exposure to corrosive environments in a wastewater manhole.Corroded material was removed and specimens were dried prior to photographing.
Mentions: As judged by regression of gravimetric data and surface area assessments specimens exposed to the atmosphere in MH2 (Experiments 2A and 2B) experienced more mass loss and surface corrosion than those exposed to the atmosphere in MH1 (Experiment 1) (ANCOVA p<0.01 for both parameters). In all cases hydrogen sulfide levels were significantly higher in MH2 than the downstream MH1. Lower hydrogen sulfide gas concentrations in MH1 likely facilitated slower diffusion of hydrogen sulfide to the concrete surface moisture, resulting in reduced amounts of substrate for acidogenic bacteria. Fig. 1 shows each specimen after removal of corrosion product.

Bottom Line: In this study, the succession of microbes associated with corroding concrete was characterized over a one-year monitoring campaign using rRNA sequence-based phylogenetic methods.Microbial communities associated with corrosion fronts presented distinct succession patterns which converged to markedly low α-diversity levels (< 10 taxa) in conjunction with decreasing pH.Early communities exposed to alkaline surface pH presented relatively high α-diversity, including heterotrophic, nitrogen-fixing, and sulfur-oxidizing genera, and one community exposed to neutral surface pH presented a diverse transition community comprised of less than 20% sulfur-oxidizers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, 80309, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Microbially-induced concrete corrosion in headspaces threatens wastewater infrastructure worldwide. Models for predicting corrosion rates in sewer pipe networks rely largely on information from culture-based investigations. In this study, the succession of microbes associated with corroding concrete was characterized over a one-year monitoring campaign using rRNA sequence-based phylogenetic methods. New concrete specimens were exposed in two highly corrosive manholes (high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide gas) on the Colorado Front Range for up to a year. Community succession on corroding surfaces was assessed using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S bacterial rRNA amplicons and Sanger sequencing of 16S universal rRNA clones. Microbial communities associated with corrosion fronts presented distinct succession patterns which converged to markedly low α-diversity levels (< 10 taxa) in conjunction with decreasing pH. The microbial community succession pattern observed in this study agreed with culture-based models that implicate acidophilic sulfur-oxidizer Acidithiobacillus spp. in advanced communities, with two notable exceptions. Early communities exposed to alkaline surface pH presented relatively high α-diversity, including heterotrophic, nitrogen-fixing, and sulfur-oxidizing genera, and one community exposed to neutral surface pH presented a diverse transition community comprised of less than 20% sulfur-oxidizers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus