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Effects of meteorological factors on the composition of selected fungal spores in the air.

Grinn-Gofroń A, Bosiacka B - Aerobiologia (Bologna) (2014)

Bottom Line: The CCA results indicated that all statistically significant variables accounted for 15.3 % of the total variance in the spore data in the 4 years.The highest values of the total variance in the spore data, explained by the statistically significant variables, were found in 2010 (32.3 %), with the highest contribution of mean air temperature (23.8 %).Canonical correspondence analysis provides not only a comprehensive assessment of the impact of meteorological factors on specific spore combinations in the air, but also informative graphical presentations of the results, illustrating the correlation between the occurrence of particular spore taxa and meteorological variables.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Taxonomy and Phytogeography, Faculty of Biology, University of Szczecin, Wąska 13 Street, 71-415 Szczecin, Poland.

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to determine functional relationships between composition of air spora and meteorological factors, using multivariate statistical technique: canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). Analyses were conducted for the data collected during the 4 year (2007-2010) and, in order to show the dynamics of such relationships, for each year separately. The CCA results indicated that all statistically significant variables accounted for 15.3 % of the total variance in the spore data in the 4 years. The largest amount of the total variance was explained in this period by the mean air temperature (9.2 %). The meteorological factors impacted spore composition differently in different years, when analysis was done for each year separately. The highest values of the total variance in the spore data, explained by the statistically significant variables, were found in 2010 (32.3 %), with the highest contribution of mean air temperature (23.8 %). In that year, the above-mentioned parameter had the lowest value in comparison to other years. Canonical correspondence analysis provides not only a comprehensive assessment of the impact of meteorological factors on specific spore combinations in the air, but also informative graphical presentations of the results, illustrating the correlation between the occurrence of particular spore taxa and meteorological variables.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Diagram of fungal spore and meteorological variable ordination along the first two CCA axes for samples collected in Szczecin (NW Poland); total for all years of the study (2007–2010)
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Fig1: Diagram of fungal spore and meteorological variable ordination along the first two CCA axes for samples collected in Szczecin (NW Poland); total for all years of the study (2007–2010)

Mentions: According to the ordination diagram (Fig. 1), the occurrence of spores of Alternaria, Drechslera type and Cladosporium was associated with the highest TME and DP values, Ganoderma, Epicoccum and Didymella—with moderate values, whereas Leptosphaeria and Torula—with the lowest values. Following the gradient of increasing relative humidity of air, the occurrence of spores of Didymella and Leptosphaeria was related to the highest RH values, whereas Torula and Alternaria—to the lowest values. The spores of Ganoderma, Epicoccum, Drechslera type and Cladosporium occurred at moderate values of relative humidity of air. The maximum abundance of Leptosphaeria and Didymella spores was observed at the highest values of the last statistically significant variable—WINDME, at the moderate values—Ganoderma, Epicoccum and Torula, and at the lowest values—Cladosporium, Drechslera type and Alternaria.Fig. 1


Effects of meteorological factors on the composition of selected fungal spores in the air.

Grinn-Gofroń A, Bosiacka B - Aerobiologia (Bologna) (2014)

Diagram of fungal spore and meteorological variable ordination along the first two CCA axes for samples collected in Szczecin (NW Poland); total for all years of the study (2007–2010)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4342788&req=5

Fig1: Diagram of fungal spore and meteorological variable ordination along the first two CCA axes for samples collected in Szczecin (NW Poland); total for all years of the study (2007–2010)
Mentions: According to the ordination diagram (Fig. 1), the occurrence of spores of Alternaria, Drechslera type and Cladosporium was associated with the highest TME and DP values, Ganoderma, Epicoccum and Didymella—with moderate values, whereas Leptosphaeria and Torula—with the lowest values. Following the gradient of increasing relative humidity of air, the occurrence of spores of Didymella and Leptosphaeria was related to the highest RH values, whereas Torula and Alternaria—to the lowest values. The spores of Ganoderma, Epicoccum, Drechslera type and Cladosporium occurred at moderate values of relative humidity of air. The maximum abundance of Leptosphaeria and Didymella spores was observed at the highest values of the last statistically significant variable—WINDME, at the moderate values—Ganoderma, Epicoccum and Torula, and at the lowest values—Cladosporium, Drechslera type and Alternaria.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The CCA results indicated that all statistically significant variables accounted for 15.3 % of the total variance in the spore data in the 4 years.The highest values of the total variance in the spore data, explained by the statistically significant variables, were found in 2010 (32.3 %), with the highest contribution of mean air temperature (23.8 %).Canonical correspondence analysis provides not only a comprehensive assessment of the impact of meteorological factors on specific spore combinations in the air, but also informative graphical presentations of the results, illustrating the correlation between the occurrence of particular spore taxa and meteorological variables.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Taxonomy and Phytogeography, Faculty of Biology, University of Szczecin, Wąska 13 Street, 71-415 Szczecin, Poland.

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to determine functional relationships between composition of air spora and meteorological factors, using multivariate statistical technique: canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). Analyses were conducted for the data collected during the 4 year (2007-2010) and, in order to show the dynamics of such relationships, for each year separately. The CCA results indicated that all statistically significant variables accounted for 15.3 % of the total variance in the spore data in the 4 years. The largest amount of the total variance was explained in this period by the mean air temperature (9.2 %). The meteorological factors impacted spore composition differently in different years, when analysis was done for each year separately. The highest values of the total variance in the spore data, explained by the statistically significant variables, were found in 2010 (32.3 %), with the highest contribution of mean air temperature (23.8 %). In that year, the above-mentioned parameter had the lowest value in comparison to other years. Canonical correspondence analysis provides not only a comprehensive assessment of the impact of meteorological factors on specific spore combinations in the air, but also informative graphical presentations of the results, illustrating the correlation between the occurrence of particular spore taxa and meteorological variables.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus