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The prevalence of periodontal disease in a Romano-British population c. 200-400 AD.

Raitapuro-Murray T, Molleson TI, Hughes FJ - Br Dent J (2014)

Bottom Line: The number of affected teeth increased with age.Horizontal bone loss was generally minor.Caries was seen in around 50% of the cohort, and evidence of pulpal and apical pathology was seen in around 25%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] [2] Barts &The London School of Medicine &Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of moderate to severe periodontitis in an ancient British cohort c. 200-400 AD.

Design: Observational study to assess periodontal and other oral disease parameters.

Setting: Natural History Museum, London.

Subjects and methods: 303 skulls from a Romano-British burial site in Poundbury, Dorset were examined for evidence of dental disease.

Main outcome measures: The primary outcome measure was presence of moderate to severe periodontitis. Secondary outcomes included: amount of horizontal bone loss; prevalence of ante-mortem tooth loss; and presence of other dental pathologies.

Results: The overall prevalence of moderate to severe periodontitis was just greater than 5%. The prevalence rate remained nearly constant between ages 20 to 60, after which it rose to around 10%. The number of affected teeth increased with age. Horizontal bone loss was generally minor. Caries was seen in around 50% of the cohort, and evidence of pulpal and apical pathology was seen in around 25%.

Conclusions: The prevalence of moderate to severe periodontitis was markedly decreased when compared to the prevalence in modern populations, underlining the potential importance of risk factors such as smoking and diabetes in determining susceptibility to progressive periodontitis in modern populations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of average horizontal bone loss and age for each sample examined.Cut off point of 2 mm greater than average bone height shown as broken line
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f4: Distribution of average horizontal bone loss and age for each sample examined.Cut off point of 2 mm greater than average bone height shown as broken line

Mentions: Based on measurements between the CEJ and the alveolar bone crest a figure for the average distance between the two was counted for each age. When individuals presented with the equal of or more than two millimetres of bone loss than the expected value for their age they were considered to suffer with horizontal bone loss due to periodontitis. Twenty-two individuals presented with more bone loss than average for their age. This equated to 7.3% of the population. Figure 4 describes the relationship of average bone loss and age. Table 4 lists the individuals with periodontal bone loss divided in age groups. Because of the selected criteria and the phenomenon of continuing eruption these results need to be viewed with caution.


The prevalence of periodontal disease in a Romano-British population c. 200-400 AD.

Raitapuro-Murray T, Molleson TI, Hughes FJ - Br Dent J (2014)

Distribution of average horizontal bone loss and age for each sample examined.Cut off point of 2 mm greater than average bone height shown as broken line
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4340975&req=5

f4: Distribution of average horizontal bone loss and age for each sample examined.Cut off point of 2 mm greater than average bone height shown as broken line
Mentions: Based on measurements between the CEJ and the alveolar bone crest a figure for the average distance between the two was counted for each age. When individuals presented with the equal of or more than two millimetres of bone loss than the expected value for their age they were considered to suffer with horizontal bone loss due to periodontitis. Twenty-two individuals presented with more bone loss than average for their age. This equated to 7.3% of the population. Figure 4 describes the relationship of average bone loss and age. Table 4 lists the individuals with periodontal bone loss divided in age groups. Because of the selected criteria and the phenomenon of continuing eruption these results need to be viewed with caution.

Bottom Line: The number of affected teeth increased with age.Horizontal bone loss was generally minor.Caries was seen in around 50% of the cohort, and evidence of pulpal and apical pathology was seen in around 25%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] [2] Barts &The London School of Medicine &Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of moderate to severe periodontitis in an ancient British cohort c. 200-400 AD.

Design: Observational study to assess periodontal and other oral disease parameters.

Setting: Natural History Museum, London.

Subjects and methods: 303 skulls from a Romano-British burial site in Poundbury, Dorset were examined for evidence of dental disease.

Main outcome measures: The primary outcome measure was presence of moderate to severe periodontitis. Secondary outcomes included: amount of horizontal bone loss; prevalence of ante-mortem tooth loss; and presence of other dental pathologies.

Results: The overall prevalence of moderate to severe periodontitis was just greater than 5%. The prevalence rate remained nearly constant between ages 20 to 60, after which it rose to around 10%. The number of affected teeth increased with age. Horizontal bone loss was generally minor. Caries was seen in around 50% of the cohort, and evidence of pulpal and apical pathology was seen in around 25%.

Conclusions: The prevalence of moderate to severe periodontitis was markedly decreased when compared to the prevalence in modern populations, underlining the potential importance of risk factors such as smoking and diabetes in determining susceptibility to progressive periodontitis in modern populations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus