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A Tale of Two Recent Spills — Comparison of 2014 Galveston Bay and 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Residues

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ABSTRACT

Managing oil spill residues washing onto sandy beaches is a common worldwide environmental problem. In this study, we have analyzed the first-arrival oil spill residues collected from two Gulf of Mexico (GOM) beach systems following two recent oil spills: the 2014 Galveston Bay (GB) oil spill, and the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill. This is the first study to provide field observations and chemical characterization data for the 2014 GB oil spill. Here we compare the physical and chemical characteristics of GB oil spill samples with DWH oil spill samples and present their similarities and differences. Our field observations indicate that both oil spills had similar shoreline deposition patterns; however, their physical and chemical characteristics differed considerably. We highlight these differences, discuss their implications, and interpret GB data in light of lessons learned from previously published DWH oil spill studies. These analyses are further used to assess the long-term fate of GB oil spill residues and their potential environmental impacts.

No MeSH data available.


Comparison of extracted ion chromatograms of steranes (m/z of 217) for Galveston Bay and Deepwater Horizon oil spill residues [Peak 1: DiaC27βα(S); Peak 2: DiaC27βα(R); Peak 3: C27ααα(S); Peak 4: C27αββ(R); Peak 5: C27αββ(S); Peak 6: C27ααα(R); Peak 7: C28ααα(S); Peak 8: C28αββ(R); Peak 9: C28αββ(S); Peak 10: C28ααα(R); Peak 11: C29ααα(S); Peak 12: C29αββ(R); Peak 13: C29αββ(S); Peak 14: C29ααα(R)].
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pone.0118098.g008: Comparison of extracted ion chromatograms of steranes (m/z of 217) for Galveston Bay and Deepwater Horizon oil spill residues [Peak 1: DiaC27βα(S); Peak 2: DiaC27βα(R); Peak 3: C27ααα(S); Peak 4: C27αββ(R); Peak 5: C27αββ(S); Peak 6: C27ααα(R); Peak 7: C28ααα(S); Peak 8: C28αββ(R); Peak 9: C28αββ(S); Peak 10: C28ααα(R); Peak 11: C29ααα(S); Peak 12: C29αββ(R); Peak 13: C29αββ(S); Peak 14: C29ααα(R)].

Mentions: The total steranes in GB and DWH samples were found to be 221±5 and 720±30 mg/kg oil, respectively. Similar to hopane data, sterane data can also be used for source identification. Fig. 8 shows the chromatograms of steranes (at m/z 217) for both GB and DWH residues. The data show that steranes in GB residue are dominated by several high molecular weight compounds (such as C29-steranes). We have identified several sterane peaks based on published data [22,23] and used them to compute various diagnostic ratios that are suggested in the literature [14,18,19]; these results are summarized in Table 2. The sterane dataset provides an additional line of evidence for identifying and differentiating other residues from these two oil spills.


A Tale of Two Recent Spills — Comparison of 2014 Galveston Bay and 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Residues
Comparison of extracted ion chromatograms of steranes (m/z of 217) for Galveston Bay and Deepwater Horizon oil spill residues [Peak 1: DiaC27βα(S); Peak 2: DiaC27βα(R); Peak 3: C27ααα(S); Peak 4: C27αββ(R); Peak 5: C27αββ(S); Peak 6: C27ααα(R); Peak 7: C28ααα(S); Peak 8: C28αββ(R); Peak 9: C28αββ(S); Peak 10: C28ααα(R); Peak 11: C29ααα(S); Peak 12: C29αββ(R); Peak 13: C29αββ(S); Peak 14: C29ααα(R)].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4340883&req=5

pone.0118098.g008: Comparison of extracted ion chromatograms of steranes (m/z of 217) for Galveston Bay and Deepwater Horizon oil spill residues [Peak 1: DiaC27βα(S); Peak 2: DiaC27βα(R); Peak 3: C27ααα(S); Peak 4: C27αββ(R); Peak 5: C27αββ(S); Peak 6: C27ααα(R); Peak 7: C28ααα(S); Peak 8: C28αββ(R); Peak 9: C28αββ(S); Peak 10: C28ααα(R); Peak 11: C29ααα(S); Peak 12: C29αββ(R); Peak 13: C29αββ(S); Peak 14: C29ααα(R)].
Mentions: The total steranes in GB and DWH samples were found to be 221±5 and 720±30 mg/kg oil, respectively. Similar to hopane data, sterane data can also be used for source identification. Fig. 8 shows the chromatograms of steranes (at m/z 217) for both GB and DWH residues. The data show that steranes in GB residue are dominated by several high molecular weight compounds (such as C29-steranes). We have identified several sterane peaks based on published data [22,23] and used them to compute various diagnostic ratios that are suggested in the literature [14,18,19]; these results are summarized in Table 2. The sterane dataset provides an additional line of evidence for identifying and differentiating other residues from these two oil spills.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Managing oil spill residues washing onto sandy beaches is a common worldwide environmental problem. In this study, we have analyzed the first-arrival oil spill residues collected from two Gulf of Mexico (GOM) beach systems following two recent oil spills: the 2014 Galveston Bay (GB) oil spill, and the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill. This is the first study to provide field observations and chemical characterization data for the 2014 GB oil spill. Here we compare the physical and chemical characteristics of GB oil spill samples with DWH oil spill samples and present their similarities and differences. Our field observations indicate that both oil spills had similar shoreline deposition patterns; however, their physical and chemical characteristics differed considerably. We highlight these differences, discuss their implications, and interpret GB data in light of lessons learned from previously published DWH oil spill studies. These analyses are further used to assess the long-term fate of GB oil spill residues and their potential environmental impacts.

No MeSH data available.