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Evaluation of the microcirculation in a rabbit hemorrhagic shock model using laser Doppler imaging.

Luo Z, Wang P, Zhang A, Zuo G, Zheng Y, Huang Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In contrast, the MAP values did not differ significantly between the time points of 0 and 30 after hemorrhage (p > 0.05).Both the flux numbers and the red-to-blue color changes on LDI imaging showed the reduction of the microcirculation.Further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness in clinical practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Critical Care Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) for noninvasive and dynamic assessment of hemorrhagic shock in a rabbit model. A rabbit model of hemorrhagic shock was generated and LDI of the microcirculation in the rabbit ears was performed before and at 0, 30, 60, and 90 min after hemorrhage. The CCD (Charge Coupled Device) image of the ears, the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and the heart rate (HR) were monitored. The mean LDI flux was calculated. The HR of rabbits was significantly (p < 0.05) elevated and the MAP was decreased after hemorrhage, compared to the pre-hemorrhage level. Within the initial 30 min after hemorrhage, the perfusion flux lineally dropped down. In contrast, the MAP values did not differ significantly between the time points of 0 and 30 after hemorrhage (p > 0.05). Both the flux numbers and the red-to-blue color changes on LDI imaging showed the reduction of the microcirculation. LDI imaging is a noninvasive and non-contact approach to evaluate the microcirculation and may offer benefits in the diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhage shock. Further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness in clinical practice.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Top-to-bottom LDI scans of a typical rabbit ear at different time points.Lighter shades correspond to higher perfusion in flux units and darker areas correspond to lower perfusion. A mean flux value was obtained for each image.
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pone.0116076.g002: Top-to-bottom LDI scans of a typical rabbit ear at different time points.Lighter shades correspond to higher perfusion in flux units and darker areas correspond to lower perfusion. A mean flux value was obtained for each image.

Mentions: Both the vessels (veins and arteries) and the microcirculation in the ears of the rabbits, which can not been seen by eyes, were readily identified on LDI imaging before hemorrhage (Fig. 1). The perfusion flux was markedly reduced after hemorrhage, decreasing from the basal level of 1691.81 ± 158.22 to 382.1 ± 51 at the time point of 90 min. Both the flux numbers and the red-to-blue color changes in the ears of the rabbits showed clearly the reduction of the microcirculation (Figs. 2 and 3).


Evaluation of the microcirculation in a rabbit hemorrhagic shock model using laser Doppler imaging.

Luo Z, Wang P, Zhang A, Zuo G, Zheng Y, Huang Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

Top-to-bottom LDI scans of a typical rabbit ear at different time points.Lighter shades correspond to higher perfusion in flux units and darker areas correspond to lower perfusion. A mean flux value was obtained for each image.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4340874&req=5

pone.0116076.g002: Top-to-bottom LDI scans of a typical rabbit ear at different time points.Lighter shades correspond to higher perfusion in flux units and darker areas correspond to lower perfusion. A mean flux value was obtained for each image.
Mentions: Both the vessels (veins and arteries) and the microcirculation in the ears of the rabbits, which can not been seen by eyes, were readily identified on LDI imaging before hemorrhage (Fig. 1). The perfusion flux was markedly reduced after hemorrhage, decreasing from the basal level of 1691.81 ± 158.22 to 382.1 ± 51 at the time point of 90 min. Both the flux numbers and the red-to-blue color changes in the ears of the rabbits showed clearly the reduction of the microcirculation (Figs. 2 and 3).

Bottom Line: In contrast, the MAP values did not differ significantly between the time points of 0 and 30 after hemorrhage (p > 0.05).Both the flux numbers and the red-to-blue color changes on LDI imaging showed the reduction of the microcirculation.Further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness in clinical practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Critical Care Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) for noninvasive and dynamic assessment of hemorrhagic shock in a rabbit model. A rabbit model of hemorrhagic shock was generated and LDI of the microcirculation in the rabbit ears was performed before and at 0, 30, 60, and 90 min after hemorrhage. The CCD (Charge Coupled Device) image of the ears, the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and the heart rate (HR) were monitored. The mean LDI flux was calculated. The HR of rabbits was significantly (p < 0.05) elevated and the MAP was decreased after hemorrhage, compared to the pre-hemorrhage level. Within the initial 30 min after hemorrhage, the perfusion flux lineally dropped down. In contrast, the MAP values did not differ significantly between the time points of 0 and 30 after hemorrhage (p > 0.05). Both the flux numbers and the red-to-blue color changes on LDI imaging showed the reduction of the microcirculation. LDI imaging is a noninvasive and non-contact approach to evaluate the microcirculation and may offer benefits in the diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhage shock. Further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness in clinical practice.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus