Limits...
Evaluation of the microcirculation in a rabbit hemorrhagic shock model using laser Doppler imaging.

Luo Z, Wang P, Zhang A, Zuo G, Zheng Y, Huang Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In contrast, the MAP values did not differ significantly between the time points of 0 and 30 after hemorrhage (p > 0.05).Both the flux numbers and the red-to-blue color changes on LDI imaging showed the reduction of the microcirculation.Further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness in clinical practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Critical Care Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) for noninvasive and dynamic assessment of hemorrhagic shock in a rabbit model. A rabbit model of hemorrhagic shock was generated and LDI of the microcirculation in the rabbit ears was performed before and at 0, 30, 60, and 90 min after hemorrhage. The CCD (Charge Coupled Device) image of the ears, the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and the heart rate (HR) were monitored. The mean LDI flux was calculated. The HR of rabbits was significantly (p < 0.05) elevated and the MAP was decreased after hemorrhage, compared to the pre-hemorrhage level. Within the initial 30 min after hemorrhage, the perfusion flux lineally dropped down. In contrast, the MAP values did not differ significantly between the time points of 0 and 30 after hemorrhage (p > 0.05). Both the flux numbers and the red-to-blue color changes on LDI imaging showed the reduction of the microcirculation. LDI imaging is a noninvasive and non-contact approach to evaluate the microcirculation and may offer benefits in the diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhage shock. Further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness in clinical practice.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

A: LDI image of the rabbit ear (Red, high perfusion; blue, low perfusion).The flux scale is displayed below each image. B: CCD image of the rabbit ear. The two images are shown at the same scale for comparison.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4340874&req=5

pone.0116076.g001: A: LDI image of the rabbit ear (Red, high perfusion; blue, low perfusion).The flux scale is displayed below each image. B: CCD image of the rabbit ear. The two images are shown at the same scale for comparison.

Mentions: The ear of the rabbits was cleared of the hair. The laser beam, 1 mm in diameter and 785 nm in wavelength and 2.25 mW in output, was scanned across the ear of animals in two dimensions before and at a 30-min interval up to 90 min after withdrawing blood samples. Each scan took about 90 s. The non-contact scanner was positioned 50 cm above the targeted zone, as depicted in Fig. 1. Scans were saved, and mean perfusion in flux units was calculated using the commercial software (moor V5.3, Moor Instruments Ltd., Axminster, UK). The site chosen for the measurement of the microcirculation flux was between the large vessels.


Evaluation of the microcirculation in a rabbit hemorrhagic shock model using laser Doppler imaging.

Luo Z, Wang P, Zhang A, Zuo G, Zheng Y, Huang Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

A: LDI image of the rabbit ear (Red, high perfusion; blue, low perfusion).The flux scale is displayed below each image. B: CCD image of the rabbit ear. The two images are shown at the same scale for comparison.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4340874&req=5

pone.0116076.g001: A: LDI image of the rabbit ear (Red, high perfusion; blue, low perfusion).The flux scale is displayed below each image. B: CCD image of the rabbit ear. The two images are shown at the same scale for comparison.
Mentions: The ear of the rabbits was cleared of the hair. The laser beam, 1 mm in diameter and 785 nm in wavelength and 2.25 mW in output, was scanned across the ear of animals in two dimensions before and at a 30-min interval up to 90 min after withdrawing blood samples. Each scan took about 90 s. The non-contact scanner was positioned 50 cm above the targeted zone, as depicted in Fig. 1. Scans were saved, and mean perfusion in flux units was calculated using the commercial software (moor V5.3, Moor Instruments Ltd., Axminster, UK). The site chosen for the measurement of the microcirculation flux was between the large vessels.

Bottom Line: In contrast, the MAP values did not differ significantly between the time points of 0 and 30 after hemorrhage (p > 0.05).Both the flux numbers and the red-to-blue color changes on LDI imaging showed the reduction of the microcirculation.Further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness in clinical practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Critical Care Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) for noninvasive and dynamic assessment of hemorrhagic shock in a rabbit model. A rabbit model of hemorrhagic shock was generated and LDI of the microcirculation in the rabbit ears was performed before and at 0, 30, 60, and 90 min after hemorrhage. The CCD (Charge Coupled Device) image of the ears, the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and the heart rate (HR) were monitored. The mean LDI flux was calculated. The HR of rabbits was significantly (p < 0.05) elevated and the MAP was decreased after hemorrhage, compared to the pre-hemorrhage level. Within the initial 30 min after hemorrhage, the perfusion flux lineally dropped down. In contrast, the MAP values did not differ significantly between the time points of 0 and 30 after hemorrhage (p > 0.05). Both the flux numbers and the red-to-blue color changes on LDI imaging showed the reduction of the microcirculation. LDI imaging is a noninvasive and non-contact approach to evaluate the microcirculation and may offer benefits in the diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhage shock. Further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness in clinical practice.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus