Limits...
China's great wall, Israel's Bar Lev Line, and passive infectious disease surveillance.

Elbadry MA, Merrill MM, Ma MM, Ma MJ, Lu JH, Cao WC, Gray GC - Mil Med Res (2014)

Bottom Line: Emerging infectious diseases are some of modern society's greatest threats.This paper highlights the importance of embracing new interdisciplinary approaches towards emerging pathogen threats.This paper briefly discusses the above problems and preliminary steps taken by Chinese academic institutions to embrace the One Health approach.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: One Health Center of Excellence for Research and Training and College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100188, Gainesville, FL 32610 USA.

ABSTRACT
Emerging infectious diseases are some of modern society's greatest threats. Like some great construction efforts designed to protect mankind, current public health measures against these emerging pathogens have not always been successful. This paper highlights the importance of embracing new interdisciplinary approaches towards emerging pathogen threats. One such approach, termed One Health, is quickly being embraced by professional organizations and public health institutions across the world as a way forward. This paper briefly discusses the above problems and preliminary steps taken by Chinese academic institutions to embrace the One Health approach.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of higher academic institutions in the United States of America currently engaged in One Health-related research or training programs.
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Fig1: Map of higher academic institutions in the United States of America currently engaged in One Health-related research or training programs.

Mentions: Just as the Great Wall was built to defend in a time when man’s chief military weapons were the sword and arrows, many existing public health strategies were created to defend against disease agents of the past. We must adapt our strategies to match the changing disease landscape. Similar to the breach of the Bar Lev line, novel pathogens can catch us off guard even when we do our best to anticipate them. When we examine today’s infectious diseases, we see that roughly 75% of emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic, meaning they spread between humans and other animals [4]. The study and control of these novel zoonotic pathogens require an integrated, interdisciplinary approach involving human, veterinary, and environmental health experts, also called the “One Health” approach. This approach is being endorsed by many professional and academic organizations including: The World Bank, The US Institute of Medicine, The US CDC, etc. [5–8]. Only through interdisciplinary and often international cooperation can the characteristics and transmission patterns of these novel agents be properly understood and the public health best protected. This concept is being widely embraced internationally. In the US alone at least academic institutions have initiated some sort of One Health research or training programs (Figure 1).Figure 1


China's great wall, Israel's Bar Lev Line, and passive infectious disease surveillance.

Elbadry MA, Merrill MM, Ma MM, Ma MJ, Lu JH, Cao WC, Gray GC - Mil Med Res (2014)

Map of higher academic institutions in the United States of America currently engaged in One Health-related research or training programs.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4340838&req=5

Fig1: Map of higher academic institutions in the United States of America currently engaged in One Health-related research or training programs.
Mentions: Just as the Great Wall was built to defend in a time when man’s chief military weapons were the sword and arrows, many existing public health strategies were created to defend against disease agents of the past. We must adapt our strategies to match the changing disease landscape. Similar to the breach of the Bar Lev line, novel pathogens can catch us off guard even when we do our best to anticipate them. When we examine today’s infectious diseases, we see that roughly 75% of emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic, meaning they spread between humans and other animals [4]. The study and control of these novel zoonotic pathogens require an integrated, interdisciplinary approach involving human, veterinary, and environmental health experts, also called the “One Health” approach. This approach is being endorsed by many professional and academic organizations including: The World Bank, The US Institute of Medicine, The US CDC, etc. [5–8]. Only through interdisciplinary and often international cooperation can the characteristics and transmission patterns of these novel agents be properly understood and the public health best protected. This concept is being widely embraced internationally. In the US alone at least academic institutions have initiated some sort of One Health research or training programs (Figure 1).Figure 1

Bottom Line: Emerging infectious diseases are some of modern society's greatest threats.This paper highlights the importance of embracing new interdisciplinary approaches towards emerging pathogen threats.This paper briefly discusses the above problems and preliminary steps taken by Chinese academic institutions to embrace the One Health approach.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: One Health Center of Excellence for Research and Training and College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100188, Gainesville, FL 32610 USA.

ABSTRACT
Emerging infectious diseases are some of modern society's greatest threats. Like some great construction efforts designed to protect mankind, current public health measures against these emerging pathogens have not always been successful. This paper highlights the importance of embracing new interdisciplinary approaches towards emerging pathogen threats. One such approach, termed One Health, is quickly being embraced by professional organizations and public health institutions across the world as a way forward. This paper briefly discusses the above problems and preliminary steps taken by Chinese academic institutions to embrace the One Health approach.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus