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Correlation between blood pressure changes and AMS, sleeping quality and exercise upon high-altitude exposure in young Chinese men.

Liu Y, Zhang JH, Gao XB, Wu XJ, Yu J, Chen JF, Bian SZ, Ding XH, Huang L - Mil Med Res (2014)

Bottom Line: Lake Louise criteria were used to diagnose AMS.After acute exposure to 3,700 m, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) rose gradually and continually (P < 0.05).Analysis showed a relationship with AMS for only MABP (P < 0.05) but not for SBP and DBP (P > 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases of PLA; Department of Cardiology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, 400037 China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Excessive elevation of arterial blood pressure (BP) at high altitude can be detrimental to our health due to acute mountain sickness (AMS) or some AMS symptoms. This prospective and observational study aimed to elucidate blood pressure changes induced by exposure to high-altitude hypoxia and the relationships of these changes with AMS prevalence, AMS severity, sleep quality and exercise condition in healthy young men.

Methods: A prospective observational study was performed in 931 male young adults exposed to high altitude at 3,700 m (Lhasa) from low altitude (LA, 500 m). Blood pressure measurement and AMS symptom questionnaires were performed at LA and on day 1, 3, 5, and 7 of exposure to high altitude. Lake Louise criteria were used to diagnose AMS. Likewise, the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were filled out at LA and on day 1, 3, and 7 of exposure to high altitude.

Results: After acute exposure to 3,700 m, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) rose gradually and continually (P < 0.05). Analysis showed a relationship with AMS for only MABP (P < 0.05) but not for SBP and DBP (P > 0.05). Poor sleeping quality was generally associated with higher SBP or DBP at high altitude, although inconsistent results were obtained at different time (P < 0.05). SBP and Pulse BP increased noticeably after high-altitude exercise (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Our data demonstrate notable blood pressure changes under exposure to different high-altitude conditions: 1) BP increased over time. 2) Higher BP generally accompanied poor sleeping quality and higher incidence of AMS. 3) SBP and Pulse BP were higher after high-altitude exercise. Therefore, we should put more effort into monitoring BP after exposure to high altitude in order to guard against excessive increases in BP.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Interclass distribution of arterial blood pressure at different altitudes and time courses. (A) SBP (systolic blood pressure, mmHg), (B) DBP (diastolic blood pressure, mmHg). LA: Low altitude (500 m); HA-3,700 m: High-altitude 3,700 m. Day 1, Day 3, Day 5, Day 7: all at high-altitude 3,700 m. Values are proportions. aP < 0.05 compared with LA.
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Fig2: Interclass distribution of arterial blood pressure at different altitudes and time courses. (A) SBP (systolic blood pressure, mmHg), (B) DBP (diastolic blood pressure, mmHg). LA: Low altitude (500 m); HA-3,700 m: High-altitude 3,700 m. Day 1, Day 3, Day 5, Day 7: all at high-altitude 3,700 m. Values are proportions. aP < 0.05 compared with LA.

Mentions: Altitudes: On day 1 at 3,700 m, high-altitude SBP (121.25 ± 12.69 mmHg) was significantly higher than that at LA (115.15 ± 10.53 mmHg, P = 0.000, Table 1). Although the mean SBP value at 3,700 m (Day 1) was within normal range, an interclass analysis illustrated that a proportion of the subjects (51.96%) with SBP values over 120 mmHg was higher than that at LA (30.81%, Figure 2). Moreover, the mean SBP value of over 120 mmHg at 3,700 m (Day 1) (129.98 ± 10.07 mmHg) was higher than that at LA (127.42 ± 7.99 mmHg, P = 0.037).


Correlation between blood pressure changes and AMS, sleeping quality and exercise upon high-altitude exposure in young Chinese men.

Liu Y, Zhang JH, Gao XB, Wu XJ, Yu J, Chen JF, Bian SZ, Ding XH, Huang L - Mil Med Res (2014)

Interclass distribution of arterial blood pressure at different altitudes and time courses. (A) SBP (systolic blood pressure, mmHg), (B) DBP (diastolic blood pressure, mmHg). LA: Low altitude (500 m); HA-3,700 m: High-altitude 3,700 m. Day 1, Day 3, Day 5, Day 7: all at high-altitude 3,700 m. Values are proportions. aP < 0.05 compared with LA.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4340834&req=5

Fig2: Interclass distribution of arterial blood pressure at different altitudes and time courses. (A) SBP (systolic blood pressure, mmHg), (B) DBP (diastolic blood pressure, mmHg). LA: Low altitude (500 m); HA-3,700 m: High-altitude 3,700 m. Day 1, Day 3, Day 5, Day 7: all at high-altitude 3,700 m. Values are proportions. aP < 0.05 compared with LA.
Mentions: Altitudes: On day 1 at 3,700 m, high-altitude SBP (121.25 ± 12.69 mmHg) was significantly higher than that at LA (115.15 ± 10.53 mmHg, P = 0.000, Table 1). Although the mean SBP value at 3,700 m (Day 1) was within normal range, an interclass analysis illustrated that a proportion of the subjects (51.96%) with SBP values over 120 mmHg was higher than that at LA (30.81%, Figure 2). Moreover, the mean SBP value of over 120 mmHg at 3,700 m (Day 1) (129.98 ± 10.07 mmHg) was higher than that at LA (127.42 ± 7.99 mmHg, P = 0.037).

Bottom Line: Lake Louise criteria were used to diagnose AMS.After acute exposure to 3,700 m, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) rose gradually and continually (P < 0.05).Analysis showed a relationship with AMS for only MABP (P < 0.05) but not for SBP and DBP (P > 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases of PLA; Department of Cardiology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, 400037 China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Excessive elevation of arterial blood pressure (BP) at high altitude can be detrimental to our health due to acute mountain sickness (AMS) or some AMS symptoms. This prospective and observational study aimed to elucidate blood pressure changes induced by exposure to high-altitude hypoxia and the relationships of these changes with AMS prevalence, AMS severity, sleep quality and exercise condition in healthy young men.

Methods: A prospective observational study was performed in 931 male young adults exposed to high altitude at 3,700 m (Lhasa) from low altitude (LA, 500 m). Blood pressure measurement and AMS symptom questionnaires were performed at LA and on day 1, 3, 5, and 7 of exposure to high altitude. Lake Louise criteria were used to diagnose AMS. Likewise, the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were filled out at LA and on day 1, 3, and 7 of exposure to high altitude.

Results: After acute exposure to 3,700 m, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) rose gradually and continually (P < 0.05). Analysis showed a relationship with AMS for only MABP (P < 0.05) but not for SBP and DBP (P > 0.05). Poor sleeping quality was generally associated with higher SBP or DBP at high altitude, although inconsistent results were obtained at different time (P < 0.05). SBP and Pulse BP increased noticeably after high-altitude exercise (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Our data demonstrate notable blood pressure changes under exposure to different high-altitude conditions: 1) BP increased over time. 2) Higher BP generally accompanied poor sleeping quality and higher incidence of AMS. 3) SBP and Pulse BP were higher after high-altitude exercise. Therefore, we should put more effort into monitoring BP after exposure to high altitude in order to guard against excessive increases in BP.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus