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Semantic framework for mapping object-oriented model to semantic web languages.

Ježek P, Mouček R - Front Neuroinform (2015)

Bottom Line: This approach does not burden users with additional demands on programming environment since reflective Java annotations were used as an entry for these expressions.Moreover, additional semantics need not to be written by the programmer directly to the code, but it can be collected from non-programmers using a graphic user interface.This approach was validated by the integration of the Semantic Framework in the EEG/ERP Portal and by the subsequent registration of the EEG/ERP Portal in the Neuroscience Information Framework.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New Technologies for the Information Society, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of West Bohemia Plzeň, Czech Republic ; Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of West Bohemia Plzeň, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
The article deals with and discusses two main approaches in building semantic structures for electrophysiological metadata. It is the use of conventional data structures, repositories, and programming languages on one hand and the use of formal representations of ontologies, known from knowledge representation, such as description logics or semantic web languages on the other hand. Although knowledge engineering offers languages supporting richer semantic means of expression and technological advanced approaches, conventional data structures and repositories are still popular among developers, administrators and users because of their simplicity, overall intelligibility, and lower demands on technical equipment. The choice of conventional data resources and repositories, however, raises the question of how and where to add semantics that cannot be naturally expressed using them. As one of the possible solutions, this semantics can be added into the structures of the programming language that accesses and processes the underlying data. To support this idea we introduced a software prototype that enables its users to add semantically richer expressions into a Java object-oriented code. This approach does not burden users with additional demands on programming environment since reflective Java annotations were used as an entry for these expressions. Moreover, additional semantics need not to be written by the programmer directly to the code, but it can be collected from non-programmers using a graphic user interface. The mapping that allows the transformation of the semantically enriched Java code into the Semantic Web language OWL was proposed and implemented in a library named the Semantic Framework. This approach was validated by the integration of the Semantic Framework in the EEG/ERP Portal and by the subsequent registration of the EEG/ERP Portal in the Neuroscience Information Framework.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

EEG/ERP Portal in the NIF Registry. The list of experiments stored in the EEG/ERP Portal is shown in the NIF registry at link https://www.neuinfo.org/mynif/search.php?q=eegbase&t=indexable&list=cover&nif=nif-0000-08190-1. The list contains direct hyperlinks to the experiments stored in the EEG/ERP Portal. When a user clicks on a hyperlink, he/she is redirected to the EEG/ERP Portal.
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Figure 7: EEG/ERP Portal in the NIF Registry. The list of experiments stored in the EEG/ERP Portal is shown in the NIF registry at link https://www.neuinfo.org/mynif/search.php?q=eegbase&t=indexable&list=cover&nif=nif-0000-08190-1. The list contains direct hyperlinks to the experiments stored in the EEG/ERP Portal. When a user clicks on a hyperlink, he/she is redirected to the EEG/ERP Portal.

Mentions: The generated OWL documents are typically used when registering the EEG/ERP Portal with other providers of neuroinformatics services. We successfully used the Neuroscience Informational Framework (NIF) (Gardner et al., 2008). The NIF framework provides a unified interface for accessing neurophysiological data through resources described by ontology web languages (Gupta et al., 2008). NIF uses a proprietary framework DISCO (Marenco et al., 2010). It is an XML-based script containing a static description of the registered resource. The dynamic content is accessed through a generated ontology. The structure of metadata instances is stored in an Interoperability XML file that is a part of the DISCO protocol. The interoperability file is stored in the root directory of the EEG/ERP Portal together with generated DISCO files. The NIF framework reloads it at regular intervals. It enables dynamic access to the content of the EEG/ERP Portal. Figure 7 shows experiments listed through the NIF registry. Currently more then 100 experiments are available in the NIF registry and new ones are being gradually added.


Semantic framework for mapping object-oriented model to semantic web languages.

Ježek P, Mouček R - Front Neuroinform (2015)

EEG/ERP Portal in the NIF Registry. The list of experiments stored in the EEG/ERP Portal is shown in the NIF registry at link https://www.neuinfo.org/mynif/search.php?q=eegbase&t=indexable&list=cover&nif=nif-0000-08190-1. The list contains direct hyperlinks to the experiments stored in the EEG/ERP Portal. When a user clicks on a hyperlink, he/she is redirected to the EEG/ERP Portal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4340193&req=5

Figure 7: EEG/ERP Portal in the NIF Registry. The list of experiments stored in the EEG/ERP Portal is shown in the NIF registry at link https://www.neuinfo.org/mynif/search.php?q=eegbase&t=indexable&list=cover&nif=nif-0000-08190-1. The list contains direct hyperlinks to the experiments stored in the EEG/ERP Portal. When a user clicks on a hyperlink, he/she is redirected to the EEG/ERP Portal.
Mentions: The generated OWL documents are typically used when registering the EEG/ERP Portal with other providers of neuroinformatics services. We successfully used the Neuroscience Informational Framework (NIF) (Gardner et al., 2008). The NIF framework provides a unified interface for accessing neurophysiological data through resources described by ontology web languages (Gupta et al., 2008). NIF uses a proprietary framework DISCO (Marenco et al., 2010). It is an XML-based script containing a static description of the registered resource. The dynamic content is accessed through a generated ontology. The structure of metadata instances is stored in an Interoperability XML file that is a part of the DISCO protocol. The interoperability file is stored in the root directory of the EEG/ERP Portal together with generated DISCO files. The NIF framework reloads it at regular intervals. It enables dynamic access to the content of the EEG/ERP Portal. Figure 7 shows experiments listed through the NIF registry. Currently more then 100 experiments are available in the NIF registry and new ones are being gradually added.

Bottom Line: This approach does not burden users with additional demands on programming environment since reflective Java annotations were used as an entry for these expressions.Moreover, additional semantics need not to be written by the programmer directly to the code, but it can be collected from non-programmers using a graphic user interface.This approach was validated by the integration of the Semantic Framework in the EEG/ERP Portal and by the subsequent registration of the EEG/ERP Portal in the Neuroscience Information Framework.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New Technologies for the Information Society, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of West Bohemia Plzeň, Czech Republic ; Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of West Bohemia Plzeň, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
The article deals with and discusses two main approaches in building semantic structures for electrophysiological metadata. It is the use of conventional data structures, repositories, and programming languages on one hand and the use of formal representations of ontologies, known from knowledge representation, such as description logics or semantic web languages on the other hand. Although knowledge engineering offers languages supporting richer semantic means of expression and technological advanced approaches, conventional data structures and repositories are still popular among developers, administrators and users because of their simplicity, overall intelligibility, and lower demands on technical equipment. The choice of conventional data resources and repositories, however, raises the question of how and where to add semantics that cannot be naturally expressed using them. As one of the possible solutions, this semantics can be added into the structures of the programming language that accesses and processes the underlying data. To support this idea we introduced a software prototype that enables its users to add semantically richer expressions into a Java object-oriented code. This approach does not burden users with additional demands on programming environment since reflective Java annotations were used as an entry for these expressions. Moreover, additional semantics need not to be written by the programmer directly to the code, but it can be collected from non-programmers using a graphic user interface. The mapping that allows the transformation of the semantically enriched Java code into the Semantic Web language OWL was proposed and implemented in a library named the Semantic Framework. This approach was validated by the integration of the Semantic Framework in the EEG/ERP Portal and by the subsequent registration of the EEG/ERP Portal in the Neuroscience Information Framework.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus