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Physiological and proteomic analyses on artificially aged Brassica napus seed.

Yin X, He D, Gupta R, Yang P - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Although the treatment delayed germination, it did not increase the concentration of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS).The proteins responded to the treatment were mainly involved in metabolism, protein modification and destination, stress response, development, and miscellaneous enzymes.Except for peroxiredoxin, no changes were observed in the accumulation of other antioxidant enzymes in the artificially aged seeds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Plant Germplasm Enhancement and Specialty Agriculture, Wuhan Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences Wuhan, China.

ABSTRACT
Plant seeds lose their viability when they are exposed to long term storage or controlled deterioration treatments, by a process known as seed aging. Based on previous studies, artificially aging treatments have been developed to accelerate the process of seed aging in order to understand its underlying mechanisms. In this study, we used Brassica napus seeds to investigate the mechanisms of aging initiation. B. napus seeds were exposed to artificially aging treatment (40°C and 90% relative humidity) and their physio-biochemical characteristics were analyzed. Although the treatment delayed germination, it did not increase the concentration of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Comparative proteomic analysis was conducted among the control and treated seeds at different stages of germination. The proteins responded to the treatment were mainly involved in metabolism, protein modification and destination, stress response, development, and miscellaneous enzymes. Except for peroxiredoxin, no changes were observed in the accumulation of other antioxidant enzymes in the artificially aged seeds. Increased content of abscisic acid (ABA) was observed in the artificially treated seeds which might be involved in the inhibition of germination. Taken together, our results highlight the involvement of ABA in the initiation of seed aging in addition to the ROS which was previously reported to mediate the seed aging process.

No MeSH data available.


Effects of ABA and GA on Brassica napus seed germination. Values are the means ± SE from three biological replicates.
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Figure 7: Effects of ABA and GA on Brassica napus seed germination. Values are the means ± SE from three biological replicates.

Mentions: As no major differences in the ROS concentrations and antioxidant enzymes activities were observed after CDT treatment, we speculated that oxidative stress is not the major factor involved in the inhibition of germination after CDT treatment. Therefore, involvement of some other factors, which resulted in delayed germination after CDT treatment, was expected. Among all the external and internal factors, ABA seems to be the most important one which inhibits seed germination. Therefore, we measured the ABA content of the CK and CDT seeds at both 0 and 18 h after imbibition. Interestingly, the ABA content of the CDT seeds was much higher than that observed in the CK seeds at both the time points, and showed a sharp decrease upon imbibition in both the samples (Figure 6), suggesting involvement of ABA in seed aging. To further confirm this hypothesis, the CK seeds were germinated in the presence of ABA, and showed a delayed germination (Figure 7). It is known that GA and ABA play antagonistic roles in regulating seed germination, so we also germinated the CDT seed in the presence of GA to see if this treatment can recover its germination phenotype or not. Consistently, GA treated CDT seeds showed partially recovered germination (Figure 7).


Physiological and proteomic analyses on artificially aged Brassica napus seed.

Yin X, He D, Gupta R, Yang P - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Effects of ABA and GA on Brassica napus seed germination. Values are the means ± SE from three biological replicates.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4340179&req=5

Figure 7: Effects of ABA and GA on Brassica napus seed germination. Values are the means ± SE from three biological replicates.
Mentions: As no major differences in the ROS concentrations and antioxidant enzymes activities were observed after CDT treatment, we speculated that oxidative stress is not the major factor involved in the inhibition of germination after CDT treatment. Therefore, involvement of some other factors, which resulted in delayed germination after CDT treatment, was expected. Among all the external and internal factors, ABA seems to be the most important one which inhibits seed germination. Therefore, we measured the ABA content of the CK and CDT seeds at both 0 and 18 h after imbibition. Interestingly, the ABA content of the CDT seeds was much higher than that observed in the CK seeds at both the time points, and showed a sharp decrease upon imbibition in both the samples (Figure 6), suggesting involvement of ABA in seed aging. To further confirm this hypothesis, the CK seeds were germinated in the presence of ABA, and showed a delayed germination (Figure 7). It is known that GA and ABA play antagonistic roles in regulating seed germination, so we also germinated the CDT seed in the presence of GA to see if this treatment can recover its germination phenotype or not. Consistently, GA treated CDT seeds showed partially recovered germination (Figure 7).

Bottom Line: Although the treatment delayed germination, it did not increase the concentration of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS).The proteins responded to the treatment were mainly involved in metabolism, protein modification and destination, stress response, development, and miscellaneous enzymes.Except for peroxiredoxin, no changes were observed in the accumulation of other antioxidant enzymes in the artificially aged seeds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Plant Germplasm Enhancement and Specialty Agriculture, Wuhan Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences Wuhan, China.

ABSTRACT
Plant seeds lose their viability when they are exposed to long term storage or controlled deterioration treatments, by a process known as seed aging. Based on previous studies, artificially aging treatments have been developed to accelerate the process of seed aging in order to understand its underlying mechanisms. In this study, we used Brassica napus seeds to investigate the mechanisms of aging initiation. B. napus seeds were exposed to artificially aging treatment (40°C and 90% relative humidity) and their physio-biochemical characteristics were analyzed. Although the treatment delayed germination, it did not increase the concentration of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Comparative proteomic analysis was conducted among the control and treated seeds at different stages of germination. The proteins responded to the treatment were mainly involved in metabolism, protein modification and destination, stress response, development, and miscellaneous enzymes. Except for peroxiredoxin, no changes were observed in the accumulation of other antioxidant enzymes in the artificially aged seeds. Increased content of abscisic acid (ABA) was observed in the artificially treated seeds which might be involved in the inhibition of germination. Taken together, our results highlight the involvement of ABA in the initiation of seed aging in addition to the ROS which was previously reported to mediate the seed aging process.

No MeSH data available.